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My husband had light brown eyes. His father had hazel and his mother, light brown as well. His younger brother however, has blue eyes. Both my children have blue eyes. Is this possible? I thought once the recessive gene was used in my first child, his dominant brown gene would take over?

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What is your eye color? –  Chris Feb 13 at 22:16
    
I think this - "I thought once the recessive gene was used in my first child, his dominant brown gene would take over?" is where you are going wrong. –  Alan Boyd Feb 14 at 9:55
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There is some chance for that. Look at this chart with some probabilities:

enter image description here

Its from this webpage, which also gives some background information. There is also an online calculation tool available, which takes the grandparents into account as well. It can be found here.

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I think this color chart is dependent upon the heritage of the individual. (the population in genetic speak). there are no blue eyed people in some populations. The mutation is only 10,000 years old or so. scienceblog.com/15361/all-blue-eyed-humans-have-common-ancestor –  shigeta Feb 14 at 14:37
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I know. Its a mutation in the OCA2 gene, which is thought to come up from the black sea. See the answer in this topic for the reference. –  Chris Feb 14 at 15:12
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