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I am thinking why hydrogen sulfide has its effects in the body. For instance, it is one Salmonella's virulence factor. I am not sure if such a balance equations holds

H2O + H2S <=> ...

Actually, I miss here some factors because I am not understanding the biochemistry enough to answer this. I think H2S can exists in some sort of ionic form. Hydrogen sulfide reminds me of ammonia. I think it inhibits some systems. By which mechanisms?

It is mentioned in many places the empirical effects: signalling functions similar to NO and CO. But I am interested in how this happens. What is the rate of adhesion of H2S to hemoglobin for instance?

H2S can change to sulfite and thiosulfate in mitochondria which are then excreted into urine. I think most of the biological effects are done before these forms. But in which forms?

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According to my preliminary reading around this topic, although production of hydrogen sulphide is used as a convenient method for detecting the presence of pathogenic Salmonella, there is nothing to link this trait with virulence. Do you have a reference for this? –  Alan Boyd Mar 4 at 19:18
    
You are probably right. I read about this topic in Lange's Medical Microbiology mostly, and I cannot be find any mentioning that directly related to Virulence, but there are mentionings that H2S is related to signalling functions similar to NO and CO, which possibly have virulence roles. –  Masi Mar 5 at 7:06
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Alan Boyd's answer

Production of hydrogen sulphide is used as a convenient method for detecting the presence of pathogenic Salmonella, there is nothing to link this with virulence.

which I agree with.

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