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I am interested in studying disorders that are genetic in origin. However, I am having difficulty in understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms regarding processes such as meiosis, mitosis, and recombination. I was wondering if anyone knew of a way to study these processes from a physical standpoint. When I took a class that discussed these principles, I felt that it was more memorization rather than a deep understanding of concepts such as these. Again to ask my question, does anyone know about a physical (i.e., classical mechanical/electrodynamical(magnetic) or quantum mechanical/statistical mechanical/quantum electrodynamical and thermodynamic/kinetic) way of viewing these interactions and the logic behind why certain things happen in the manner that they do. I know that this is vague. I wish that I had taken cell biology first, then molecular biology and then genetics and developmental biology rather than the way that I was advised to. It makes a lot more sense that way.

Thank you.

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closed as off-topic by Remi.b, biogirl, Ilan, Chris, MattDMo Apr 26 at 20:55

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I am afraid there is such thing as a "physical" ways of regarding molecular genetics. If you have troubles understanding some lectures, you should hesitate to ask for help. You may want to read a introductory book in biology such as this one. –  Remi.b Apr 25 at 11:40
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Don't be afraid of this subject that is new to you. We always need some times to get used to a new subject and then we realize how easy it is and how rich it is. Because you're good in physics and you struggle in biology doesn't mean it will always be so. Just be a bit persevering and everything is going to be fine. If you have any specific question, this site will be happy to help with them. –  Remi.b Apr 25 at 11:44
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I think this kind of question belongs to academia.SE that's why I vote to close (as I did for your other question) –  Remi.b Apr 25 at 15:57
    
Here is the question on academia.SE –  Remi.b Apr 26 at 8:02

1 Answer 1

Again to ask my question, does anyone know about a physical (i.e., classical mechanical/electrodynamical(magnetic) or quantum mechanical/statistical mechanical/quantum electrodynamical and thermodynamic/kinetic) way of viewing these interactions

Quantum mechanics? And DNA recombination? DNA is a molecule that can be made up of millions of subunits, with millions of atoms. I don't think it's easy to apply quantum mechanics to molecules that are so complex. Maybe you want an explanation based more in physical and organic chemistry, which would involve understanding the thermodynamics of the various bonds between atoms and molecules

But classical mechanics? I think your premise, that applying those paradigms and equations is going to yield more understanding than learning the conventional way, is not right.

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Actually, you might be surprised how relevant and applicable things such as statistical thermodynamics are to these processes... Try reading "Physical Biology of the Cell". OP see my answer at academia.SE. –  Bitwise Apr 25 at 20:16
    
Okay, but I did mention thermodynamics as the one branch that would be relevant. –  swbarnes2 Apr 25 at 21:17

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