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I'm reading about how synaptobrevin is used to identify synaptic vesicles for tethering near the synaptic cleft. Since neurons have a synapse and dendrites, I'd like to know how exactly the vesicles get moved from the Golgi to the synapse.

As far as I can tell, they are transported along microtubules by dynamins as opposed to floating freely in the cytosol (correct?). If so how do the dynenins identify synaptic vesicles - would they form a SNARE complex that gets released near the synapse or by some other means?

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In eukaryotic cells you can assume most things not to be floating freely. Enzymes and smaller molecules just diffuse, but all organelles and even big proteins are in constant contact with the cytoskeleton. (Source: Conversations with lecturers) –  Armatus Aug 5 '12 at 19:09
    
Or the membranes, of course. –  rwst Aug 6 '12 at 6:34
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are looking for a review on vesicle cargoing along the cytoskeleton. This open access article is the most recent I found on the subject.

From the abstract:

How synaptic cargos achieve specificity, directionality and timing of transport is a developing area of investigation. Recent studies demonstrate that the docking of motors to their cargos is a key control point. Moreover, precise spatial and temporal regulation of motor-cargo interactions is important for transport specificity and cargo recruitment. Local signaling pathways Ca2+ influx, CaMKII signaling and Rab GTPase activity regulate motor activity and cargo release at synaptic locations.

M. A. Schlager, C. C. Hoogenraad: Basic mechanisms for recognition and transport of synaptic cargos. In: Molecular brain. Vol. 2, 2009, p. 25. DOI:10.1186/1756-6606-2-25. PMID 19653898. PMC 2732917.

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Nice review. Although it is quite unlikely that that link will be removed... could you improve the answer by quoting relevant passages or summarizing the important information? –  nico Aug 5 '12 at 22:07
    
Thanks for the link, looks like it's Rab GTPases that attach them to microtubules. –  Ultimate Gobblement Aug 6 '12 at 17:28
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