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this year I was lucky to get sick by cold twice. First one had as a secondary symptom toothache. The second one was even more interesting in the fact, that when I cough I will fill ache in my shoulders (only when I cough or otherwise bring a lot of air into my lungs in a short period of time), but other than in those situations my shoulders were fine.

So my question is how could those symptoms be explained on the molecular level?

My guess about the first one (my reasoning is based on the information I found on wiki, so I can miss something and be totally wrong): virus enters cells, produces some specific proteins, lysis happens, those proteins are now in the Interstitial fluid, "specific" proteins are then mixed in the blood, transfered to brain, some synapses get activated by those specific proteins => I get toothache.

My guess about the second: virus enters cells, produces some specific proteins, lysis happens, those proteins are now in the Interstitial fluid. Starting from here my reasoning is slight different: normal amount of "specific" proteins mixed in blood isn't enough to activate synapses that will make me fill ache in shoulders. But when I cough I expand my lungs so much, that a lot more "specific" proteins get into the blood, so it rises level of those "specific" proteins to a level, when synapses do get activated => I fell ache in shoulders.

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I bet the shoulder pain comes from using "accessory" respiratory muscles (scalenes, trapezius) during prolonged coughing. –  kmm Jan 18 '13 at 1:05
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I don't think the cause is on the cellular level. –  Mew Jan 18 '13 at 13:50
    
physiological level you might say... nervous system and musculature –  shigeta Jun 4 at 12:50
    
The shoulder pain is likely to be referred along the phrenic nerve from your diaphragm as a result of it becoming fatigued during extended periods of coughing rather than a cellular cause –  Rory M 2 days ago

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