A rapid change in the membrane potential of excitable cells such as neurons and muscles; this usually involves a steep rise (depolarization) followed by a steep fall in membrane potential (repolarization). The cell subsequently enters a short refractory period (hyperpolarized state) during which it ...

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FitzHugh–Nagumo system with diffusion

I was studying the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with diffusion and I quite do not understand the meaning of it. If we consider the system without diffusion, \begin{equation}\label{FHN}\begin{cases} ...
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32 views

Why is active transport needed in repolarization?

During the repolarization phase of an action potential, the potassium ions diffuse out of the cell, and active transport begins. What I do not understand is why active transport is needed when the ...
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21 views

Concentration gradients across membranes with different ions

I'm trying to gain an intuition for the dynamics of across neuronal membranes. The overarching idea here is they are controlled by ion concentration gradients across the membrane (which we can ...
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13 views

Amount of Na+ needed to be transfered in order to depolarize the membrane?

I found out that the number of $Na^+$ ions that is needed to be transfered across the membrane to make it depolarized is a small number. In what way its proved? (Goldman equation maybe?)
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69 views

Original paper about the all or none law for neurons

I am looking for the original paper about the all or none law for neural activity. I know that there is a very old article about the all or none law for mammalian heart muscle fibers, but I'm ...
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50 views

Average Beginning of Action Potential in ECG by t-f HRV

I have some ECG data where I am estimating the average beginning of the action potential. I am interested in the discrete Fourier analysis of joint t-f HRV when input data is ECG. Frequency domain ...
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12 views

Membrane conductance in phase 1 of the cardiac action potential

Correct me if I am wrong, but in phase 1 of the cardiac action potential (for ventricle cells) there is flow of potassium ions due to the opening of transdent potassium channels. To me this would ...
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198 views

At what point during an action potential are the sodium potassium pumps working?

I'm trying to understand how all of the potentials during an action potential are created. My question specifically is about the sodium potassium pumps, however I would also be grateful if someone ...
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1answer
110 views

Dendrodendritic synapse through axodendritic synapse at same dendrite?

Reading Wikipedia's article of dendrodendritic synapse, I find that: Dendrodendritic synapses are activated in a similar fashion to axodendritic synapses in respects to using a chemical synapse. ...
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88 views

How does an increased amplitude affect nerve conduction velocity?

My professor said that increasing the amplitude (the amount of depolarization e.g. depolarizing from -80 mV instead of -50 mV) leads to a greater conduction velocity.
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57 views

If a blocker prevents repolarization, will the neuron be stuck in a depolarized state forever?

Potassium channels help to repolarize the cell after depolarization. But if the potassium channels are blocked, potassium ions cannot flow out of the cell to increase the membrane potential. Thus, one ...
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602 views

Do potassium channel blockers affect the resting membrane potential?

I am reading about scorpion venoms and toxins for my bio class and they appear to have a variety of potassium channel blockers. My professor asked "What effect would this have on a neuron?" and ...
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2answers
7k views

What is the difference between a graded potential and an action potential?

I was under the impression the only signals neurons send using changes in membrane potential are action potentials. But my biology professor showed us diagrams of graded potentials and action ...
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125 views

What recovers normal polarisation after hyperpolarisation?

I have been taught that a Na+/K+ pump helps to recover normal polarisation after hyperpolarisation in neurons. I could not find out how it does that, since I've also been taught that such a pump moves ...
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293 views

How to conceptualize the action potential?

In my AP Biology class, we were taught that action potentials are not electrical impulses in the same way current travels through a wire. Rather, we were taught that action potentials are changing ...
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92 views

Oscillatory electrical system using a chain of neurons

Many daily activities that we perform are result of inbuilt oscillatory circuits in our body. For example walking, breathing, heart beat, blinking, etc. The coding and decoding of stored memory also ...
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482 views

Why does the membrane of a neuron not stay at its depolarized state?

When an action potential is transmitted along the axon, the membrane reaches its depolarized state by opening Na+ channels. Both K+ (potassium) and Na+ (sodium) are now on both sides with close to ...
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2answers
255 views

Could an action potential produce few or more neurotransmitters based on the stimulus received?

I reckon that if you would be able to widen the AP width, it would produce more neurotransmitters in that larger time interval. Is that correct? Or does the neuron have a standard amount of ...
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1answer
130 views

Why is pericardium muscle repolarizated earlier than endocardium? [closed]

I was reading about heat muscle contraction and I read: The endocardium depolarization happens earlier than pericardium , but pericarduim repolarization happens earlier, therefore the T wave in ...
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1answer
55 views

Why do the size of the phase 1 notch vary among cardiac cells?

The size of the phase 1 notch varies among cardiac cells. It is prominent in myocytes in the epicardial and midmyocardial regions of the left ventricular wall and in ventricular Purkinje fibers. ...
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Are Purkinje Action Potentials Neuronal and Cardiac?

I first thought that action potentials of His-bundle i.e. Purkinje fibers are Cardiac. However, I started to think that this is not enough. I think now that they are neuronal and cardiac. My ...
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1answer
41 views

Confusion over role of current/potential in Nervous system?

I am taking a course on the nervous system and I am do not have any physics background. Therefore, I would like to know, what are we precisely talking about when we talk about current in the nervous ...
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1answer
101 views

Does repolarization of muscle fibers mean that the muscle bundle is relaxed?

If I flex my bicep and continue to contract it does it mean that the muscle cells are in depolarizing state and not repolarizing?
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1answer
57 views

Cardiac Excitation Threshold - in C++ modelling [closed]

So I am trying to write a code in C++ about the cardiac excitation threshold. I know that this excitation threshold is the shortest stimulus2 value at which it can conduct an action potential (known ...
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1answer
77 views

All or nothing phenomena

We know that an action potential is produced by an active cell membrane when the stimulus reaches a certain threshold. When it does, an action potential fires, and when it doesn't, nothing happens. ...
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1answer
88 views

What is the mechanism responsible for the 'delay' in delayed rectifier potassium channels?

I've been trying to find a comprehensive explanation concerning the nature of the 'delay' in neurons' delayed rectifier potassium channels. As it's written in my intro to neuroscience textbook, these ...
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329 views

Can a single axon propagate multiple simultaneous action potentials?

I have not been able to locate any research that indicates whether a single axon of a neuron or nerve cell can conduct multiple simultaneous (i.e. spatially separate) action potentials. I am aware ...
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1answer
150 views

How does core-conductor model correspond to an actual neuron?

Hi guys, looking at your average neuron, it is very difficult for me to imagine how this could be translated into a core-conductor model On the neuron above, where would be the intracellular ...
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73 views

How to measure Na/K channel activation at the membrane level?

Assume that there are two different signals occurring on the ECG - during depolarization and repolarization in the standard ECG. I was advised not to use the standard ECG in measuring the exact ...
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1answer
431 views

Mechanism of antiperistalsis

What is the mechanism of antiperistalsis that occurs during vomiting? Why the peristaltic waves normally don't propagate in anal to oral direction? Please give logical explanation with authentic ...
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1answer
263 views

Fastest and slowest action potential

When our instructor asked us about the speed of action potentials in cells, I told him that action potentials and two-wheelers travels at similar speeds. He thought that this is an 'interesting' way ...
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273 views

What is the nature of action potentials in autonomic nervous system?

My conjecture is that the natures of sympathetic and parasympathetic action potentials are different. My findings propose me that sympathetic action potential is little longer lasting than ...
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1answer
67 views

Sodium-Potassium Pump

From my understanding, in the sodium-potassium pump we have Na+ inside the cell and K+ outside the cell, thus forming a so called "salted banana." After reading my textbook I found many statements ...
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1answer
386 views

Refractory period in action potential

I know that the part E in this graph is definitely the part of refractory period. My question : Will there be any effect on B,C or D if a stimulus is given at time B,CorD respectively ?
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1answer
1k views

Action potential and sodium channels

In this video on electro tonic potential, the tutor says that when the potassium channels open the potential drops from +40mV to -80mV, where the sodium channels have already closed at +40mV. Now in ...
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188 views

Confused at what is happening with these action potentials

Ok so for a bit of a background, I am doing a science project looking at the action potentials of the earthworm. I anaesthatized the worms then hooked them up to a spiker box ...
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1answer
73 views

What happens to potassium after an action potential?

If I understand right, after repolarization, much of the potassium is outside the membrane and much of the sodium / calcium is inside. How does it get back to the original concentrations (i.e. ...
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1answer
16k views

What is the effect of extra-cellular potassium concentration on heart rate and conduction velocity?

If the extracellular potassium concentration surrounding a myocyte increases, then the potassium gradient accross the cell membrane decreases, and therefore the resting membrane potential will become ...
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1answer
171 views

Do nerve cells cause action potential in cardiac muscle?

I think the answer is no, but I am not 100% sure. If it was yes, then the dendrite of the nerve cell should each time receive a stimulus causing Na+ channels to open, when the contraction happen. ...