A protein produced by the B-cells of the immune system which binds to a particular antigen, a foreign substance to the body.

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Does denaturing proteins lead to loss of epitopes?

I am doing an experiment where I have to do both Immunohistochemistry and SDS-PAGE. I am assuming that the native conformation of the protein is maintained in the IHC. But during the blot, we heat the ...
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What is the rationale behind IgM being the default antibody?

I know that the$\ C _\mu $ gene appears first in line for class switching and hence the IgM is the default antibody. But what is the rationale for it being so? There must be some advantage (...
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Using only one antibody to detect COX-2 enzyme

If I wanted to detect COX-2 from a western blot test, would only a primary antibody work? I'm on a budget so does anyone know of relatively cheap COX-2 antibodies?
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B-cell antibody production

I've just learned about B cells in immunology lectures and some things are not clear to me. Here's what I know: 1) Apparently, each B cell produces a specific antibody, determined randomly at the ...
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137 views

What is A in IgA? [duplicate]

What is the significance of letter A in immunoglobulinA? What are the significance of other letters D, M , G, E in diffeternt types of antibodies?
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42 views

Blood antigens and immune response

In my textbook, the definition of an antigen is written as follows: Antigen: A substance that the body recognises as foreign and that can evoke an immune response The following image also confused ...
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Can ELISA be used to detect a plant enzyme? Creating assay for a new enzyme

If the goal is to generate a rapid assay for an enzyme of plant source what are the typical options? i.e. Could one do something like: Generate an antibody to the enzyme and then use it to create an ...
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44 views

Why does the blood not clump and result in death?

In this question's accepted answer, it is said that the blood type will slowly change to that of the donor's. When the blood in the person is about 50% his own and 50% that of the donor's. i.e, 50% A ...
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IG isotypes in commercial mAb products

It appears that most monoclonal antibody medical products exclusively contain the IgG (and some IgE) isotypes. Also, some manufacturers use only certain IgG subclasses. While the IgG-isotype is the ...
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How would the immune system respond to antigens and food poisoning?

QUESTION: How does this information explain the likelihood of a more violent response in someone who has already had food poisoning caused by salmonella bacteria WHAT I KNOW: In the first exposure, ...
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72 views

ADCs: by what mechanism are antibodies internalised [closed]

I read that ADCs (Antibody-Drug Conjugates) act by a -mab for a particular target being bonded to a cytotoxic compound. From my high-school-with-crayons knowledge of antibodies, however, one part of ...
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116 views

Why don't antibodies generally bind to food and drugs?

Are these excluded thru central tolerance? What if you ingested something with a unique molecular structure that you hadn't ingested before?
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My flow cytometry antibody won't reach saturation

I am staining human neutrophil populations (CD177) and then trying to get a different test target antibody to give a dose response to binding to this population. I have tried concentrations of the ...
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132 views

Is a variable domain in immunoglobulin's heavy chain different from the one in light chain?

I guess yes, there is difference in amino acid sequences of $V_L$ and $V_H$. And so we have 6 different complementarity determining regions (CDRs) per monomeric immunoglobulin as two heavy chains are ...
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33 views

Why every Ab-Ag complex doesn't lead to anaphylatoxic shock?

if we know the background of hypersensitivitoy type 3 then this question arises. every complex should lead to anaphaylatoxic shock which is not a true statement. so then how all complexes which ...
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134 views

How plasma cells switches secreting different Ig classes?

In Type 1 hypersensitivity how do B lymphocytes switch Ig classes, from synthesizing IgG to IgE? What is the mechanism? I studied multiple pathology books, it says the same as for IgG secreting ...
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59 views

What is the attacking mechanism of RF on IgG?

Rheumatoid Factor (RF) attacks Fc portion of Immunoglobulin G (IgG), I want to know the underlying mechanism at molecular level. Also, what type of bond or attachment is made by RF and Fc portion of ...
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60 views

Purpose of antibody wash

It is common practice after surface staining cells for flow cytometry analysis to wash the antibody out of solution before analyzing a sample. I have tried analysis with and without washing the ...
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30 views

Why a repeat wasp sting cause an anaphylaxis shock?

I understand that an anaphylaxis shock caused by a huge dose of histamine. But why the first sting does not cause an anaphylaxis shock like the second sting? As i think there may be a relevant between ...
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57 views

What is the efficacy of an Ebola antibody response

There is contradictory (~?) evidence in the literature that antibody responses against Ebola are effective in clearing the virus and protecting the patient. Some time ago, I wrote a bit about the ...
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38 views

How to validate the use of an anti-virus monoclonal antibody in IHC by spiking a fresh organ with infected cultured cells?

I have assessed the specificity of a particular monoclonal antibody against a virus by immunofluorescence. I'd like to further validate it by testing it by IHC. Therefore I'd like to infect cells in ...
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52 views

Why is the administration of exogenous Anti-D not harmful to the foetus?

Haemolytic disease of the newborn can result from Rhesus incompatibility in utero. In this disease a Rh-ve mother becomes exposed to the antigens of a Rh+ve foetus by fetomaternal haemorrhage causing ...
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612 views

Can you Transfer Cancer Between People via Saliva or other Bodily Fluids?

This may sound like a strange question. But could a Cancerous cell be transferred from one person to another from Oral contact e.g. Through Saliva, or other exchange of bodily fluids? I know that ...
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370 views

Antibodies stored in freezer instead of fridge

Someone from my lab put the box of antibodies in the freezer instead the fridge. Can I hope that they will still work?
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Can we use the HIV antibody test to detect HIV in newborns? [closed]

Adults and elder children can use HIV rapid test to test HIV infection. Can we use the HIV antibody test to detect HIV in newborns too?
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What are the typical values of probabilities for nonspecific binding to an antibody?

I'm physicist by training, so please excuse me if I don't use the proper terminology. I think there is a way to make a sensor that detects if a single antibody has caught something from the flow. So ...
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387 views

Are there any disadvantages to HRP conjugated PRIMARY antibodies

I need to detect a FLAG tagged protein on a western blot and have to order an antibody. I'm not expecting to see a massive amount of my protein. To keep analysis time to a minimum I am considering a ...
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492 views

Why can we use mouse-produced antibodies on mice tissues?

I have seen biologists use mouse grown primary antibodies in mouse tissue, and they've told me that if the blood is perfused well then there is no problem with this method. How does the secondary ...
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Are there anyother method under research for curing rabies? [duplicate]

Why is rabies incurable after onset of symptoms? Although we administer HRIG (lyssa virus antibody) to the patient, why doesn't it work after onset of symptoms? And are there any other successful ...
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Does antibody staining / immunolabeling block or inhibit protein function?

In dissociated live cells, does staining them with an antibody block the protein's function? I am sorting cells based on their expression of a few marker genes, and culturing them post-sort for ...
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206 views

C1q attachment to antibodies

After reading about complement pathway and the complement components, I was wondering, does the C1q component attach to the Fab fragment or to the Fc fragment? The pictures in Janeway's Immunobiology ...
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IgA complement activation

Recently, I have been reading Janeway's immunobiology and had a question on immunoglobin A. I read that IgA activates the complement pathway using the Fab fragment of the IgA. How does IgA do that? I ...
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137 views

Fab fragments of antibodies to fight viral infections

I was reading about Fab fragment and about using them to fight of viral infections. It seems that the Fab attaches to the viral receptors, which stops the viruses from attacking the cells. It seems ...
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375 views

Western blotting with multiple antibodies

Normally I wash/detect with one primary/secondary-HRP antibody pair, strip, then wash/detect with the other primary/secondary-HRP pair which works well. However, I recently started working with a HRP-...
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How can site-directed mutagenesis be used to suppress the production of anti-antibodies?

In a previous post of mine, I asked how to supress the creation of anti-antibodies in vivo. In the answer, it was mentioned that site-directed mutagenesis could be used. Currently, I can't find mcuh ...
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How to inhibit formation of specific antibodies (to antisera)?

Is there a way to inhibit an antibody response to a specific antigen using immunosupression? I am interested in reducing the anti-antibody formation to animal antibodies such as murine antibodies in ...
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human anti-mouse antibody

I have heard about human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMAs) and read that HAMAs neutralize murine antibodies, therefore decreasing the effectiveness of those murine antibodies. Is this true that HAMAs ...
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560 views

Synthesis of immunoglobulin Fab fragments: Where can I learn about Fab?

I wanted to know the chemical reaction involved in Fab synthesis. I looked everywhere for it. No luck. I know I will find it here. All I know for now is: Fab is a monovalent fragment that is ...
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Complementarity Determining Regions (CDRs)

Complementarity determining regions (CDRs) are part of the variable domains in immunoglobulins (antibodies) and T cell receptors, generated by B-cells and T-cells respectively, where these molecules ...
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508 views

It is possible for person with AIDS be negative for HIV antibodies?

I'm just curious as there was a bit controversy around this topic. It is possible for person with AIDS be negative for HIV antibodies? As of 1989, the CDC reported that 5% of all U.S. AIDS patients ...
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463 views

What is a protective epitope?

What is a protective epitope? An epitope is basically a part of antigen. So does it mean that when the epitope combines with an antibody, it helps in the functioning of the antibody instead of going ...
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What attracts cells to: pathogens, professional antigen-presenting cells, and cells with an antigen on its MHC-1 protein?

I have a few questions in regards to attraction/stimulation in the immune system. What attracts leukocytes and antibodies to pathogens in the first place? What attracts CD4+ cells to professional ...
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131 views

Calibration curve for single radial immunodiffusion

When we draw a calibration curve for single radial immunodiffusion, the curve does not pass through origin. Instead, there is a y intercept. Why does that happen ? Shouldn't zero antigen give zero ...
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How can cells produce antibodies despite error-checking mechanisms in their genomes?

How can immune cells produce so many different kinds of antibodies with different variable regions if there are so many mechanisms inside the cells that try to keep the DNA sequence as constant as ...
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60 views

Why Rh conflict happen but no ABO conflicts?

I wonder why Rhesus conflict can happen during pregnancy and mother can make antibodies against Rh protein (I think the correct name is D protein), but it doesn't happen if mother has different ABO ...
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604 views

Dimerization of Immunoglobulin G

I would like to know the specific determinants for formation of IgG dimers. My understanding is the stem of the antibody is a homodimer of two heavy chains, covalently bonded through two disulfide ...
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657 views

What is the beneficial function of IgE antibody?

Dont tell me the "function" of IgE is to cause allergy ! In whatever texts I have seen it is written that IgE is important to cause allergies but what is the beneficial function of IgE ? Why was it ...
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163 views

How does HBeAg change to Anti-HBe in acute hepatitis

I am thinking this figure which can also be drawn like this How does HBeAg change to Anti-HBe? There are some triggers that stimulate Anti-HBe production after HBeAg level is done. I think ...
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391 views

Agglutination test using antibodies

Agglutination test Latex agglutination using bound antigens : by coating soluble (non - particulate ) antigens on to microscopic latex spheres, their reaction with a particular antibody can be ...
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Are there baby drinks closer to breast-milk?

Many women cannot or will not feed their children with breast-milk. It is my understanding breast-milk has many advantages over formula. Some psychological like oxytocin and some physiological like ...