Toxins secreted by bacteria. Toxins are the agents which cause most of the toxicity of bacteria and are often highly toxic. Examples include the tetanus and the diptheria toxins.

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Why do gram-positive bacteria cause respiratory diseases more frequently than gram-negative bacteria? [closed]

My theory is that aerobic respiration by gram positive bacteria thrives in ideal conditions of the lungs therefore creates respiratory diseases?
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What gives diarrhoea caused by Cholera its milky colour?

The diarrhoea caused by the Cholera bacteria is a milky colour, also known as 'rice-water' like. Why is this? I have a fairly good understanding of how Cholera acts on the body.
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Is honey in hot green tea unsafe?

I used Google to try to figure out what kind of mixture honey has with hot water, and I found several Ayurvedic sources claiming that honey in hot water is toxic. For example: Honey – NEVER Put It ...
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Are erythrocytes lysed during alpha hemolysis?

Wikipedia says: When alpha hemolysis (α-hemolysis) is present, the agar under the colony is dark and greenish. Streptococcus pneumoniae and a group of oral streptococci (Streptococcus viridans or ...
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Secretion in Gram negative bacteria

Among the 6 secretion systems in bacteria, can these 6 ways be sorted out in the order of how harmful it is to the human host? Like say type 3 is highly virulent so that comes first, but I don't know ...
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Why does bacillus thuringiensis produce bt toxin?

Background : B.thuringiensis produces an inactive crystalline toxin during sporulation which when ingested by an insect, gets activated and causes pore formation in gut , subsequently leading to death ...
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Regulation of V. cholerae virulence factors

So I know that several different environmental signals, such as pH, bile, and temperature, regulate virulence gene expression in V. cholerae. Specifically, they control expression of the genes ...
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Persistency of botulinum toxin in environment

There is information about decontamination times here on pages 6 and 7. My specific question is how persistent botulinum toxin is in a natural environment, or alternatively, what is the half life of ...
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Why does botulinum toxin seem to be more dangerous to humans than to other mammals?

Various mammals seem to get away with eating parts of carcasses that we would prefer to not even touch, and that we assume will make us sick. Because of that, I assume botulinum toxin is more ...
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Can botulinum toxin be grown or kept from denaturing in an UNWRAPPED 50 pound hay bale?

Botulinum toxin is the neurotoxin protein created when botulism spores grow. The requirements for growth and/or for keeping the toxin from denaturing would seem to be very difficult to create in bale ...
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Can Listeria monocytogenes endotoxin act as an A-B toxin?

I think no, but I am not sure since Listeria is Gram-positive and probably has lipopolysaccharide (exception among Gram positive bacteria). Can Listeria monocytogenes' endotoxin act like exotoxin ...
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What is one Botulinum toxin medical unit?

How many Botulinum toxin molecules or grams are contained in one medical unit of Botox?
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How long can C. Tetani survive in soil?

Clostridium tetani (C. tetani) is a bacterium commonly found in soil and is excreted in the faeces of many animals (both mammals and birds) and serves, by means of the exotoxin, tetanospasmin, causes ...