A subdivision of microbiology dedicated to the study of bacteria.

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Gut fauna genetics vs epigenetics

During childhood your gut fauna gets populated from the environment and the people you meet. Unlike baby koalas, we do not eat our parent's faeces to populate that fauna. The environment in your gut ...
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22 views

Why doesn't one develop immunity to bacterial STIs?

Why doesn't one develop immunity to STIs such as Chlamydia/Gonorrhea and Syphilis even after the first exposure and treatment with antibiotics?
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Bacteria surviving a β-lactam antibiotic

What changes can occur in the cell wall of a bacteria for it to survive a β-lactam antibiotic? I think that because a bacteria possesses peptidoglycan in its cell wall, they are β-lactam sensitive, ...
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41 views

What is a catalytic domain?

I have to answer a few questions from an article I'm reading, and I am just really confused on defining "catalytic domain." I have to relate it to the antibiotic Teixobactin. Is catalytic domain the ...
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29 views

How is a bacterial strain defined?

When a species of bacteria is referred to by its strain, are they a clone of single founder or is a certain amount variation allowed?
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23 views

How long can you effectively store a glycerol stock at -20 degrees Celsius?

I know that glycerol stocks are typically kept in a -80 °C freezer, however there are some people who do not have access to such equipment. How long would you be able to keep a glycerol stock at ...
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How do microbes develop resistance to anitmicrobial peptides?

I would like to better understand how bacteria use the "strategy" of alternations to lipid A and membrane proteins in order to resist antimicrobial peptides of the immune system? It is my ...
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51 views

Pink growth (aka pink slime) in bathtub or shower

I was wondering if anybody had studied or was knowledgeable about the pink growth that people often find around water fixtures in their homes, especially bath tubs and showers? My understanding is ...
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Are Betaproteobacteria more 'simple' than Gammaproteobacteria?

More generally, are all proteobacteria named in order of complexity (Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, Epsilon)? If so, would it be right to say that Betaproteobacteria can survive in lower nutrition / more ...
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how to calculate dilution factor and CFU

I'm very confused I did a bacterial experiment where i added 5 grams to 70ml of distilled water that contains 10g of fresh meat. I left it in a sampler container over 24 hours then i cultured ...
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Feasibility of “smart effective microorganisms”

This might be a stupid question as I have little to no knowledge of biology, but I would really like to find out if it would be feasible to make such a system as a way of preventing infections. I ...
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What is the advantage of using plant-derived antibacterials rather than bacteria-derived antibacterials?

So obviously we have a big problem with antibiotic resistance. Most of our antibiotics originate from bacteria themselves (or are synthetic variations on scaffolds which originate from bacteria). I ...
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Advocate for the pop-culture idea of withholding vaccination [closed]

While it is widely accepted that vaccination is preferable to not vaccinating, would anyone like to give a shot at providing evidence in favor of not vaccinating? Anything goes.
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Is it worth to experiment with pro-biotics at home?

Let's assume that Joe has done some investigation on Internet and wants to see, if pro-biotics would help him. Now he goes to amazon.com and buys a pro-biotic product with excellent average rating. ...
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122 views

Can an argument be made that humans are 90% bacterial?

On the blog, All about Scientist in Microword: Microbiology, I read the post We are 90% bacteria, actually, which says that humans are 90% bacterial cells. If this is the case, then why don't we ...
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Is 100% antibacterial resistance possible?

The quest to develop antibacterial and antibiotic substances has often been described as an arms-race, as bacterial life develops resistance, requiring us to develop novel agents which can effectively ...
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Microbiology- Pseudomonas aeruginosa, BSAC data

I tested Pseudomonas aeruginosaagainst various antibiotics, using Stokes and Kirby-Bauer. When I compared my results with BSAC data it was completely different (understandable) but why for a lot of ...
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1answer
81 views

What is the difference between a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and a plasmid?

Is it just that a BAC is generally larger and artificially constructed? Or are there any other differences?
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111 views

Why do bacteria need messenger RNA?

Why do bacteria need mRNA? Isn't the DNA free floating without nuclear membrane so why doesn't the tRNA read the code directly off of the split DNA strands? (ofcourse after helicase splits them). ...
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Why isn't the RNA in bacteria always split up and replicating?

Isn't helicase always free floating in bacterial cells, and the DNA without a nuclear membrane and uncoiled and freefloating and so why doesn't the helicase keep breaking the double helix of DNA? ...
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How does the immune system recognize pathogens?

There are useful and pathogenic bacteria in our body. How does the immune system differentiate between them?
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How much genomic variation one usually find within a given bacterial species?

If I find the exact starting position (say 1152471) of the coding sequence of a given gene in the genome of a bacterium, is the genome of the bacterium in general stable enough so that I can expect to ...
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percentage of animal diseases caused by bacteria?

I know this is a long shot, but what is the approximate percentage out of all the animal diseases that are caused by bacteria? One of the Q&A websites answer it as 90, but is there any conclusive ...
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1answer
33 views

Why are bacterial cultures necessary?

I notice that in a lot of bacteria testing procedures the sample has to be cultured. You place the sample in agar or another growth medium and wait for the bacteria to proliferate before examining ...
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1answer
47 views

Using evolution of bacteria against themselves

We know that mutations happen regularly in bacteria and also that one bacteria might get the mutation and become stronger than the others and thus survive, causing antibiotic resistance as well. Can ...
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Examining milk for presence of harmful bacteria

I am not experienced in diagnostic bacteriology and am interested in understanding more about it in the context of analyzing food purity. For example, imagine I have a supply of raw milk which might ...
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310 views

Can bacteria release free DNA into their environment?

Natural transformation AKA natural competence involves the uptake of DNA into a competent bacterium (for horizontal gene transfer or as a food source). My question is about where this extracellular ...
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Does soap kill human cells?

I see many products, particularly hand soap and cleaning products, that claim to kill 99.9% or more of bacteria. This makes me wonder, if the chemicals are potent enough to break down bacterial cell ...
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If all bacteria in human gut are dead, can they be there again?

If someone likes to eat chocolate, she may have gut bacteria which like chocolate according to some articles that I have read. ...
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Favored Conditions of Bacterial Growth

I have read that bacteria "thrive" in warm places. Naturally, I am very interested in why this is the case. Humans for instance thrive also in relatively warm conditions if it's too cold or too warm ...
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Bacteria resistance to natural antibiotics? [duplicate]

It is a known fact that bacteria develop immunity to antibiotics. Why then did not all bacteria develop immunity to natural antibiotics like penicillin in the fungi? It is for sure that fungi did not ...
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Why a particular species of bacteria give rise to particular type of colony? [closed]

Bacterial colony varies in form, elevation, margin, opacity, chromogenesis etc. What gives definite character to a colony and what is the source of all the diversity? Is the reason similar to that of ...
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How do I test if microbes have survived after dehydration?

I have a solution containing various bacteria and fungi. My aim is to place solution on filter paper, and wait until it dries. I then wish to test if the organisms have survived, either on the dried ...
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Do adult humans exchange beneficial bacteria? If so, how?

Recently there has been increasing interest and research into symbiotic bacteria present in humans and human gut. I'm aware of two new discoveries: humans are surrounded by a unique cloud of ...
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1answer
38 views

Are there antibiotics for all bacteria somewhere in the earth? [closed]

When I read about Penicillin, I found that it came from a green mold to protect itself. If all bacteria and/or molds in competition to survive, can we believe that there is an antibiotic for each ...
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1answer
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Why would a bacterial population show initial growth when it is in unfavorable growth conditions?

This figure shows the anaerobe E. faecalis grown in aerobic conditions, E. coli grown in restricted conditions that are not specified. Why do they show an increase in abundance initially? The black ...
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Two different sized colonies from the same species of bacteria. What does it mean? [closed]

I have got two different sized colonies in a plate of Salmonella Paratyphi, identified by biochemical methods. What does two different sized colonies mean? What kind of question can I investigate in ...
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How do you interpret this microbiology/ bacteriology research figure?

This is a figure from a research article that I am to do a senior presentation for. It is showing bacterial replication of an enteric bacteria population. The researchers hypothesize that the ...
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4answers
111 views

Can general soap kill bacteria?

I have read that general soap can kill bacteria by opening holes in the bacterial membrane. http://questions.sci-toys.com/node/90 However, I found some articles as well saying that it cannot. ...
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1answer
61 views

What if there are no bacteria such as Streptococcus mutans

If someone removed all bacteria such Streptococcus mutans in her mouth by starving long time, or by some chemical method, would she never have such bacteria? In my thought, because S.mutans only ...
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Why don't bacteria eat food leftovers?

I have thrown a dirty spoon after eating some pasta into one of my desk drawers (doesn't do me much honor). It stayed there for around a year. My house is warm and I think there is enough humidity for ...
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Which Lactobacillales (Lactic acid bacteria — LAB) strains are capable of degrading starch?

I've been researching bacteria strains but am having trouble finding amylolytic LAB strains with amylolytic and lactic acid producing character. The only species I've found, that are capable of ...
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3answers
120 views

Does a microwave oven disinfect food?

Imagine I am preparing food, just about to put it into a microwave oven, and some of it falls on the floor. Assuming it got some bacteria or other organisms (viruses?) on it, will the microwave ...
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51 views

How can E. coli affect C. elegans expression?

Plasmids can be transferred to E. coli. These transformed E. coli can be fed to C. elegans to silence its gene expression by RNAi. How can E.coli release RNAi to C. elegans? Even if we assume E. ...
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547 views

How heavy are all foreign microorganisms in and on the human body?

I define "foreign microorganism" as a microorganism which is not produced by the human body (not antibodies or leukocytes) including bacteria, viruses, fungi, biofilm aggregates or small lifeforms ...
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Enrichment of slow growing microbes: Large Test Tubes as an alternative?

Well, i would like to enrich bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers from soil samples using Minimal Salt media. They are slow growing microbes. I would like to enrich them with the aim to produce ...
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2answers
47 views

Blood testing for chlamydia

I am working with the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. The main test for this species is the naat test, which is based on amplification. But I would like to know how the bacteria affects the blood ...
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1answer
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How many diseases can be linked to disruption in the microbiome of a human?

I was listing to the radio and heard recent research found a link between children and higher cases of asthma when certain bacteria are missing from the microbiome. How many other diseases can be ...
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Can microorganisms (e.g. bacteria) be damaged or killed by 253,7 nm light?

The question arose in a hospital, where I saw these flyers advertising lamps that emit such light. It was claimed that they can clean the air of microorganisms up to an arbitrary degree. Does anyone ...
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Are aquatic filter feeders effective at cleaning water to a safe level?

I've been raising Daphnia magna cultures over the last few months as feedstock for freshwater aquarium fish. From my reading, Daphnia feeds on bacteria and single-celled algae, as well as other small ...