A subdivision of microbiology dedicated to the study of bacteria.

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Aerobe or facultative anaerobe organism that metabolizes acetate?

I'm assuming bacteria, but will take any suggestions. Organism must survive primarily on the acetate (plus trace elements), but I can give/take electrons, if necessary. Not interested in strict ...
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219 views

How do I measure bacterial growth in agar dishes (either by cell mass or by cell count)?

I am doing an experiment in which I am growing S. mutans in agar dishes, and I am not sure how I would measure the growth of the S. mutans. I am also not sure if I would do this by measuring cell mass ...
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What are some readily available, easy to test, bacteria?

I want to do a science fair experiment about how bacteria interact with 5-carbon vs. 6-carbon sugars, and I want a bacteria that is easy to test and is readily available. Any ideas?
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Are there any gluten-eating bacteria that are readily available?

Is there some yeast or bacterium that will eat gluten? I was hoping for some kind of yeast, but I can't find one. Where could I find one?
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Expression of plasmid genes

Are plasmid genes always expressed? If so, then isn't a bacterium wasting it's resources in expressing genes (like antibiotic resistance) which are not required in "normal" conditions? If not, then ...
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59 views

Extract bacteria from compost?

I'm working on a project where I need to find certain cellulolytic bacteria. I was looking at this list : ...
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Are there any bacteria that can receive ultrasound signals?

I'm looking for an example of bacteria that could receive ultrasound (at any ultrasound frequency) signal and possibly perform some (re)action afterwards.
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How long can C. Tetani survive in soil?

Clostridium tetani (C. tetani) is a bacterium commonly found in soil and is excreted in the faeces of many animals (both mammals and birds) and serves, by means of the exotoxin, tetanospasmin, causes ...
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504 views

How effective are restriction enzymes in protecting bacteria?

Bacteria use restriction enzymes to cut DNA of bacteriophages. Virus mutates really fast. Won't a point mutation in restriction site render the restriction enzymes of the bacteria useless ? So how ...
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Do bacteria have any mechanism to protect themselves from RNA bacteriophage?

Bacteria can cut up DNA of DNA bacteriophages by using restriction enzymes. Of what I know about restriction enzymes, I think they don't cut RNA. So, do bacteria have any mechanism through which they ...
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31 views

Which strains of C. diphteria are causing Diphteria toxin?

I got this question: Diphteria toxin is produced only by those strains of C. diphtheria that have which of the following characteristics? Encapsulated glucose fermenters lysogenic for b-prophage ...
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Why restriction enzymes cut (usually) at palindromic sequences?

Restriction enzymes usually cut only at palindromic sequences. Is there any specific reason for that ? Is there any advantage for bacteria if it cuts up virus at this type of sequences ?
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What is the advantage of restriction enzymes cutting only at specific sites?

Bacteriophages have sequences which often do not have specific sites for restriction enzymes of bacteria to cut at and so can attack the bacteria. Wouldn't it be better if bacteria had something ...
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How do plasmids protect themselves against restriction enzymes?

How do plasmids protect themselves from restriction enzymes released by bacteria (i.e., against bacteriophages)?
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Why do plasmids replicate on their own?

I know how plasmids can replicate independently of the main genome and know that they confer various properties to the bacteria and are useful in conjugation. My question is - what is the advantage ...
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94 views

Can viruses protect themselves against restriction enzymes?

Restriction enzymes cut the DNA of bacteriophages. Have bacteriophages evolved any mechanism to protect themselves from it ?