A subdivision of microbiology dedicated to the study of bacteria.

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What are artifacts in microbiology?

What kind of objects can be qualified as artifacts? How do we distinguish such objects?
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Aerobe or facultative anaerobe organism that metabolizes acetate?

I'm assuming bacteria, but will take any suggestions. Organism must survive primarily on the acetate (plus trace elements), but I can give/take electrons, if necessary. Not interested in strict ...
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218 views

How do I measure bacterial growth in agar dishes (either by cell mass or by cell count)?

I am doing an experiment in which I am growing S. mutans in agar dishes, and I am not sure how I would measure the growth of the S. mutans. I am also not sure if I would do this by measuring cell mass ...
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58 views

What are some readily available, easy to test, bacteria?

I want to do a science fair experiment about how bacteria interact with 5-carbon vs. 6-carbon sugars, and I want a bacteria that is easy to test and is readily available. Any ideas?
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33 views

Are there any gluten-eating bacteria that are readily available?

Is there some yeast or bacterium that will eat gluten? I was hoping for some kind of yeast, but I can't find one. Where could I find one?
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115 views

Expression of plasmid genes

Are plasmid genes always expressed? If so, then isn't a bacterium wasting it's resources in expressing genes (like antibiotic resistance) which are not required in "normal" conditions? If not, then ...
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59 views

Extract bacteria from compost?

I'm working on a project where I need to find certain cellulolytic bacteria. I was looking at this list : ...
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61 views

Are there any bacteria that can receive ultrasound signals?

I'm looking for an example of bacteria that could receive ultrasound (at any ultrasound frequency) signal and possibly perform some (re)action afterwards.
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How long can C. Tetani survive in soil?

Clostridium tetani (C. tetani) is a bacterium commonly found in soil and is excreted in the faeces of many animals (both mammals and birds) and serves, by means of the exotoxin, tetanospasmin, causes ...
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498 views

How effective are restriction enzymes in protecting bacteria?

Bacteria use restriction enzymes to cut DNA of bacteriophages. Virus mutates really fast. Won't a point mutation in restriction site render the restriction enzymes of the bacteria useless ? So how ...
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Do bacteria have any mechanism to protect themselves from RNA bacteriophage?

Bacteria can cut up DNA of DNA bacteriophages by using restriction enzymes. Of what I know about restriction enzymes, I think they don't cut RNA. So, do bacteria have any mechanism through which they ...
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31 views

Which strains of C. diphteria are causing Diphteria toxin?

I got this question: Diphteria toxin is produced only by those strains of C. diphtheria that have which of the following characteristics? Encapsulated glucose fermenters lysogenic for b-prophage ...
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Why restriction enzymes cut (usually) at palindromic sequences?

Restriction enzymes usually cut only at palindromic sequences. Is there any specific reason for that ? Is there any advantage for bacteria if it cuts up virus at this type of sequences ?
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What is the advantage of restriction enzymes cutting only at specific sites?

Bacteriophages have sequences which often do not have specific sites for restriction enzymes of bacteria to cut at and so can attack the bacteria. Wouldn't it be better if bacteria had something ...
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57 views

How do plasmids protect themselves against restriction enzymes?

How do plasmids protect themselves from restriction enzymes released by bacteria (i.e., against bacteriophages)?
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74 views

Why do plasmids replicate on their own?

I know how plasmids can replicate independently of the main genome and know that they confer various properties to the bacteria and are useful in conjugation. My question is - what is the advantage ...
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94 views

Can viruses protect themselves against restriction enzymes?

Restriction enzymes cut the DNA of bacteriophages. Have bacteriophages evolved any mechanism to protect themselves from it ?
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67 views

Is iodised salt harmful to the lactofermentation process?

I was discussing sauerkraut recipes with someone on IRC a minute ago, and they warned me not to use iodised salt in the process. My first (and so far, the only successful) batch is one I made with ...
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33 views

Metawatt database setup [on hold]

I am currently trying to setup Metawatt on my server but am running into trouble as described in my email to the author (who has an auto reply that he will not answer before September). So any help ...
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1answer
541 views

How to obtain bacteria samples at home?

As the original question went from hold to closed, I thought I would write up a more appropriate question. How should one go about getting bacterial samples to look at under a microscope at home? ...
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1answer
34 views

Do toxin producing strains of E. coli constantly produce toxin or only under certain conditions?

Background E. coli is prevalent everywhere but only some strains produce toxins harmful to humans, such as E. coli O157:H7. Questions 1) Would anyone know if these strains are always producing ...
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165 views

What are the functions of magnetic bacteria?

I'm trying to understand why are bacteria "equipped" with magnetosomes and why/what for do they need such organelles.
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58 views

Aside from cockroaches and other insects, which species (of all kinds) are 'immune' to ionizing radiation?

I have just been reading this excellent question and answer about cockroaches ability to withstand ionizing radiation. My question is an extension of that question: aside from insects, which other ...
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425 views

Possibility and feasibility of producing designed antibodies with bacteria

As stated here it is possible to produce fragments of antibodies in bacteria and harvest them (from the medium, I guess, but I don't have access to the full article). As it is possible to design ...
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1answer
240 views

What is a good Microbiology atlas for Bacteriology as online version?

I am looking for a online atlas for Bacteriology, the cost does not matter. I have been searching SpringerLink, and Amazon but no good online version found. What is a good atlas for Bacteriology as a ...
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1answer
806 views

What are the differences between G+ and G- bacteria?

The distinction between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is based upon the Gram staining method, that reflects the bacterial wall physical properties. However, this classification involves ...
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Is there a practical upper limit to amount of nucleotides or genes in a transformed plasmid?

I'm currently working on a synthetic biology project which involves working with lots of different parts. I would ultimately like to integrate these genes by transforming a single plasmid. I've heard ...
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151 views

What effect do oligosaccharides, like those found in legumes, have on the composition of intestinal flora in humans and if so how so?

I know that intestinal flora metabolising oligosaccharides, like those found in legumes, is the cause for the well known fact that legumes cause flatulence, but does an oligosaccharide-rich intestine ...
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63 views

How can I save bacillus strains on filter paper without an -80 degree freezer?

I want to save my bacillus strains but I don't have access to a -80 degree freezer. What are possible alternatives?
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69 views

Whence fecal E. coli (et al.) if swallowing it is dangerous?

I don't know much about medicine, and I know even less about microbiology, but I understand that there are organisms in the lower gastrointestinal tract (and in feces) of a human, like Escherichia ...
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How is the exogenous DNA protected from degradation during bacterial transformation?

During transformation, a bacterium can take up DNA from its environment. A small fraction of bacterial species are known to be naturally competent, meaning that they can engage in this sort of ...
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What is a bacterial biofilm?

Bacteria produce something called a biofilm. I have found a few definitions; some say it is a complex of live and dead bacteria and others say it is a layer on cell wall. What is it made of? What ...
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Is episome a plasmid or a virus?

A plasmid is a small DNA molecule that is physically separate from, and can replicate independently of, chromosomal DNA within a cell. In general, in eukaryotes, episomes are closed circular DNA ...
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What would cause E. coli to change from filamentous growth to normal growth?

In my lab we've observed a phenomenon in which a culture of E. coli is found to shift from normal rod growth to filamentous growth and then back to normal rod growth again several times over the ...
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165 views

Gas from bacteria that's not methane

Is gas produced by bacteria always mainly methane? Or, are there bacteria out there that produce some biogas composed mainly of hydrogen, natural gas, propane, butane?
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Is 1 g/l living biomass for a Biogas fermenter plausible?

A usual number for a healthy biogas fermenter is $10^9 - 10^{10}/mL$ Bacteria, 10-15% of which would be methanogenic archae. Exceptionally healthy fermenters have more total bacteria and up 25% ...
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274 views

Are there grass or fiber eating birds?

My understanding, that may be wrong, is that cellulose/fibre has little nutritional value to many animals because it's hard to break down thus making consumption inefficient. However, Ruminating ...
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992 views

Why are pili more common in Gram negative bacteria than in Gram positive?

Although pili have been observed in some species of Gram positive bacteria, the preliminary research that I have done indicates that pili are significantly more common in Gram negative bacteria. Is ...
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362 views

What are gram negative and positive bacteria?

I've just finished a course of double antibiotics for Helicobacter pylori in my stomach. I looked up H. pylori and found that it was a gram-negative bacterium. I looked up gram-negative and didn't ...
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Do sulfate reducing bacteria help during the formation of the mineral dolomite in low temperature environments?

Do sulfate reducing bacteria help during the formation of the mineral dolomite in low temperature environments? Wikipedia says The actual role of bacteria in the low-temperature formation of ...
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How might one determine if bacteria are nitrogen fixing or not?

If you had an isolate bacteria sample how would you determine if they were nitrogen fixing?
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4k views

Why are bacteria and archaea in different domains?

As I understand it, the main difference between the Bacteria and the Eucaryota domains are that eukaryotes have a nucleus and bacteria don't. I understand that bacteria and archaebacteria have enough ...
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How do infectious bacteria know when their numbers are high enough to attack a host?

When you get sick, you generally don't contract enough bacteria at once for them to succeed in battling your immune system, right? Their numbers must gradually increase in the host's body before they ...
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Proteins that are strongly overproduced in E. coli and S. cerevisiae?

I'm looking for some pointers to proteins that produce at really gigantic levels in E. coli and yeast (S. cerevisiae). Can anyone point to some champion proteins? Even in inclusion bodies and non ...
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740 views

Bacterial cell lysis - what solution to use?

I am trying to determine how quickly detergents act on bacterial cells (cell lysis). I would like to compare some detergents at difference concentrations for bacteriolytic activity. I don’t care about ...
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1answer
5k views

How do prokaryotes perform cellular respiration without membrane-bound organelles?

In order to survive, prokaryotes such as bacteria need to produce energy from food such as glucose. In eukaryotic cells, respiration is performed by mitochondria, but prokaryotic cells do not have ...
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108 views

What is the length of anaerobic biodigestion stages?

I have built an experimental portable batch biodigester to process organic garbage. A 50L drum filled half with garbage, half with water and with some cow dung added for inoculation, is connected from ...
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1answer
90 views

Have there been any experiments that duplicate chromosome copies from 23*2 to 23*3 or 23*4?

Deinococcus radiodurans is an amazing bacterium with a fantastic survival rate. It can survive to high doses of radiation, in a complete vacuum and in hydrochloric acid. How does this bacterium ...
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Flow cytometry issues

I'm having problems with data analysis here. I have flow cytometry data being collected on a Fortessa, and when I import them into FlowJo 8.7, all of my fluorescence values are systematically 10X ...
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Sparking during electroporation of plasmid DNA into bacterial cells

During electroporation of bacterial cells (I work with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but I think this applies to E. coli as well), sometimes I get sparking. I've read this is due to salts present, ...