A subdivision of microbiology dedicated to the study of bacteria.

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Are added yogurt cultures harmful to the gut?

I have read somewhere that the live culture added to yogurt acting as "healthy" gut bacteria are actually synthetic and harmful. Any truth to this? If so, what are some alternatives to getting good ...
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Quorum Sensing in Vibrio cholerae

This is a figure summarising the quorum sensing mechanism in Vibrio cholerae. In this video by Bonnie Bassler, she explains how quorum sensing can be targeted to control infections. At 15:09 she ...
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How do minute changes in an organism, as a result of evolution, get carried over to next generation

The theory of evolution states that random variations in organisms occur to better suit their surroundings. We take for example a bacteria's flagella. There's a bacteria who has a tube kind of ...
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Why are plasmid genes not already incorporated into bacterial chromosomes if necessary for stressful situations?

If plasmids are important for bacteria to express specific genes under stressful conditions, why are these genes not already incorporated into their chromosome to begin with? What is the evolutionary ...
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75 views

What makes certain obligate anaerobes viable in fermentation starter cultures?

If Propionibacterium are obligate anaerobes (to wit, poisoned by oxygen), what makes 'Dairy' or classical propionibacteria (e.g. P. shermanii, P. jensenii, P. acidicpropionici, et al) viable in ...
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Speciation and Phylogeny of Lactobacillus

The lactobacillus, also called Döderlein's bacillus is a genus of facultative aerobic bacteria. There are several species such as Lactobacillus acidophillus and Lactobacillus reuteri. I have several ...
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78 views

Why is Thermus aquaticus and Taq Pol stable?

What is the molecular basis of the stability of the bacterium Thermus aquaticus and the enzyme Taq Pol it produces ? I have tried googling this but did not get a good answer.
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796 views

Mesosome - does it exist?

This wikipedia page says that mesosomes are artifacts produced by chemical fixing techniques. Most of my textbooks still show a mesosome and describes it as having functions like - respiration, ...
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304 views

How much natural genetic variation is there between bacteria of the same species?

There are lots of questions about how and why there is genetic variation between organisms of the same species, but I haven't been able to find a numerical value for the expected amount of genetic ...
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41 views

Which strains of C. diphteria are causing Diphteria toxin?

I got this question: Diphteria toxin is produced only by those strains of C. diphtheria that have which of the following characteristics? Encapsulated glucose fermenters lysogenic for b-prophage ...
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125 views

Pink growth (aka pink slime) in bathtub or shower

I was wondering if anybody had studied or was knowledgeable about the pink growth that people often find around water fixtures in their homes, especially bath tubs and showers? My understanding is ...
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Do adult humans exchange beneficial bacteria? If so, how?

Recently there has been increasing interest and research into symbiotic bacteria present in humans and human gut. I'm aware of two new discoveries: humans are surrounded by a unique cloud of ...
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46 views

How many diseases can be linked to disruption in the microbiome of a human?

I was listing to the radio and heard recent research found a link between children and higher cases of asthma when certain bacteria are missing from the microbiome. How many other diseases can be ...
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213 views

Does Pseudomonas aeruginosa have any common name at all?

Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the fifth most written about¹ binomial name of all species. I'm having trouble coming to terms with the possibility that such a well researched and studied organism has never ...
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154 views

Will an 11W UVC lamp kill bacteria?

If I shone a UVC lamp (11W) on something (say for example a plastic phone case) for an hour, would that kill off a noticeable amount of bacteria? That is, if I were to go over the case with a cotton ...
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89 views

Aerobe or facultative anaerobe organism that metabolizes acetate?

I'm assuming bacteria, but will take any suggestions. Organism must survive primarily on the acetate (plus trace elements), but I can give/take electrons, if necessary. Not interested in strict ...
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96 views

Have there been any experiments that duplicate chromosome copies from 23*2 to 23*3 or 23*4?

Deinococcus radiodurans is an amazing bacterium with a fantastic survival rate. It can survive to high doses of radiation, in a complete vacuum and in hydrochloric acid. How does this bacterium ...
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Effects of antibiotics on bacterial growth [closed]

I will do an experiment on effects of antibiotics on antibacterial growth and I will use three antibiotics: ampicilin, chloramphenicol and streptomycin. To make a hypothesis I must have a guess on ...
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How much genomic variation one usually find within a given bacterial species?

If I find the exact starting position (say 1152471) of the coding sequence of a given gene in the genome of a bacterium, is the genome of the bacterium in general stable enough so that I can expect to ...
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135 views

Two different sized colonies from the same species of bacteria. What does it mean? [closed]

I have got two different sized colonies in a plate of Salmonella Paratyphi, identified by biochemical methods. What does two different sized colonies mean? What kind of question can I investigate in ...
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Can two Hfr strains of E. coli conjugate?

Genetics textbooks (and some internet searching) yield abundant examples of Hfr strains conjugating with F- cells, but these sources are surprisingly silent regarding the results of an Hfr ...
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214 views

Can diseases be transmitted wirelessly? [closed]

According to the recent research about Electromagnetic Signals from Bacterial DNA (A. Widom, J. Swain, Y. N. Srivastava, S. Sivasubramanian) it seems there is a possibility of a "wireless" version of ...
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138 views

Transportation of bacteria

I would like to take an apparatus containing bacteria to another country (Bolivia) from the U.S.. How do I determine whether I am allowed to do this? The bacteria are: ...
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363 views

Image Processing Suite for bacterial microscopy: Schnitzcells or MicrobeTracker?

I am looking to start doing some work tracking the size and growth of individual bacterial cells in the microscope. In order to analyze the images I need software that can segment the cells, ...
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290 views

Functioning of EDTA

I know that EDTA chelates metal ions. It weakens bacterial cell wall and inactivates the DNases. What is the reason why it can do so ? I guess it can inactivate DNases by altering the ...
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248 views

List of all reported bacteria

I would like to know were to download a table file with all reported bacteria and its corresponding PHYLUM, CLASS, ORDER and FAMILY. Basically, its the same table than this one from GOLD genomes but ...
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Why are bacterial cultures necessary?

I notice that in a lot of bacteria testing procedures the sample has to be cultured. You place the sample in agar or another growth medium and wait for the bacteria to proliferate before examining ...
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What are the dimensions in angstrom of bacteria? [closed]

I'm going to take a picture of a bacteria but I am unsure how large it is. What are the dimensions in angstrom of bacteria?
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Buy bacteria for experiment?

Where can I buy paracoccus denitrificans? I need it for an experiment. I cannot find online where I can purchase this.
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What are the differences between G+ and G- bacteria?

The distinction between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is based upon the Gram staining method, that reflects the bacterial wall physical properties. However, this classification involves ...
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What did cyanobacteria gain from photosynthesis?

As far as I understand, cyanobacteria began performing photosynthesis long before plant cells as we know them arrived on the scene. But cyanobacteria do not seem to use polysaccharides in the same way ...
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Detection of bacteria to measure quality of water

I have been working on a science project were I have built a water filter. To prove that it works I would need to test if there are bacteria in a sample which has been treated vs a sample that hasn't ...
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45 views

What is a catalytic domain?

I have to answer a few questions from an article I'm reading, and I am just really confused on defining "catalytic domain." I have to relate it to the antibiotic Teixobactin. Is catalytic domain the ...
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49 views

Using evolution of bacteria against themselves

We know that mutations happen regularly in bacteria and also that one bacteria might get the mutation and become stronger than the others and thus survive, causing antibiotic resistance as well. Can ...
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What concentration of table salt is needed to kill bacteria in sweaty gym clothes?

My gym clothes retain an unpleasant musk even after washing them with warm water and detergent. I've experimented with soaking my gym clothes in salty water before washing them. My hypothesis is that ...
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Why is it that bacteria and fungi cannot develop resistance against essential oils?

I wonder why bacteria and fungi cannot develop resistance and mutate agains essential oils? For example, some fungi get killed by oregano oil. Being not a biologist, I hope my question is not so ...
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375 views

Why does beta-2-Thienylalanine inhibit bacterial growth?

I'm trying to obtain a better understanding of the Guthrie Test, which checks whether people have a disease called PKU. The Guthrie test uses bacteria to check for Phenylalanine (the amino acid) in ...
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How effective are restriction enzymes in protecting bacteria?

Bacteria use restriction enzymes to cut DNA of bacteriophages. Virus mutates really fast. Won't a point mutation in restriction site render the restriction enzymes of the bacteria useless ? So how ...
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257 views

Can viruses protect themselves against restriction enzymes?

Restriction enzymes cut the DNA of bacteriophages. Have bacteriophages evolved any mechanism to protect themselves from it ?
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Favored Conditions of Bacterial Growth

I have read that bacteria "thrive" in warm places. Naturally, I am very interested in why this is the case. Humans for instance thrive also in relatively warm conditions if it's too cold or too warm ...
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81 views

Why don't bacteria eat food leftovers?

I have thrown a dirty spoon after eating some pasta into one of my desk drawers (doesn't do me much honor). It stayed there for around a year. My house is warm and I think there is enough humidity for ...
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161 views

What are the evidence that all life today descended from a common ancestor (LUCA), and which organisms (if any) challenge the concept?

If I understand correctly, the concept of the LUCA (last universal common ancestor) is based on the hypothesis that archaea and bacteria share common ancestry. In the realm of mathematics, the same ...
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Secretion in Gram negative bacteria

Among the 6 secretion systems in bacteria, can these 6 ways be sorted out in the order of how harmful it is to the human host? Like say type 3 is highly virulent so that comes first, but I don't know ...
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To what extent is it possible to understand if a bacteria can produce a protein? (in silico only!)

I have to answer a question about a sub-task of my thesis: Can the bacteria X produce the protein Y? I searched of course Google and BLAST. There is no data supporting that this specific bacteria ...
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Property of E.coli harboring F element

From Genetics by Ursula Goodenough E.coli harboring an F element are endowed with a number of phenotypic traits : 1.They are sensitive to infection by ssRNA phages and certain ssDNA phages. ...
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150 views

Why do peas change colour?

I am doing an experiment on preservation of peas. The first notable change to the peas over a period of one week is that they have changed colour from bright green to a dull colour... Why is this ...
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298 views

Expression of plasmid genes

Are plasmid genes always expressed? If so, then isn't a bacterium wasting it's resources in expressing genes (like antibiotic resistance) which are not required in "normal" conditions? If not, then ...
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How do plasmids protect themselves against restriction enzymes?

How do plasmids protect themselves from restriction enzymes released by bacteria (i.e., against bacteriophages)?
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Do toxin producing strains of E. coli constantly produce toxin or only under certain conditions?

Background E. coli is prevalent everywhere but only some strains produce toxins harmful to humans, such as E. coli O157:H7. Questions 1) Would anyone know if these strains are always producing ...
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244 views

How is a bacterial strain defined?

When a species of bacteria is referred to by its strain, are they a clone of single founder or is a certain amount variation allowed?