The study of chemistry within the scope of biology: the compounds that occur and the reactions involving them in living organisms.

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34 views

What are the factors on which protein-protein interaction depend? [closed]

Does protein-protein interaction only happens when one of them is basic and the other acidic? Do protein interactions also depend on the protein structure? Are there more factors?
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39 views

Pasteurization and Bioavailability of Antioxidants in Beet Juice

What are the effects of pasteurization on the antioxidants found in beet juice ? Does the process render most of the beneficial nutrients (betaine) useless and make them unable for the body to process ...
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3answers
105 views

Does the necessary Carbon Dioxide need to be in the atmosphere for mammals?

In the answers to this question, we've learnt that carbon dioxide is necessary for mammalian life, but is it necessary in the atmosphere/to breathe it in? Or does the act of respiration give a ...
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40 views

Determination of a chemical compound in a non-homogeneous sample

This is a more generalized question of my other question here. I want to know if it is possible to determine a chemical compound in a non-homogeneous sample. I am asking this because we are aiming ...
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1answer
44 views

Is there a biological environment that we can we assume glutamate exists as glutamic acid?

In the body we almost always assume that glutamate exists as glutamate rather than glutamic acid. It is so commonly glutamate yet glutamic acid and glutamate share the abbreviations of Glu and E. From ...
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1answer
35 views

Dehydration from caffeine, alcohol and other

Tea, Coffee, Beer, Coke etc… I wonder if the benefit from amount of fluid we get from them is bigger or smaller then the handicap of dehydration. In other words it is worth to drink them if we want ...
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20 views

What enables azacitidine to incorporate into both DNA and RNA?

I did a mini-project on the drug azacitidine for my pharmacology class, and I learned that azacitidine has the ability to incorporate into both DNA and RNA. I think this is really unique because a ...
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1answer
84 views

Understanding intra and extracelullar concentrations (membrane potential)

I have 4 question (not homework) What happens to the cells membrane potential if: a) Na+ outside rises by 40mM b) K+ inside rises by 10mM c) K+ outside rises by 10mM d) A- (impermeable ion) ...
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69 views

How is the rate of transcription influenced by temperature?

How is the rate of transcription influenced by temperature? More precisely, I am looking for an article who quantitatively measured the rate of transcription of an "average gene" and show how this ...
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77 views

Influence of temperature on protein binding and decay rates

For computer modeling purposes, I am looking for some referenced quantitative measurements of the effect(s) of temperature on the dynamic of biochemical reactions. Question In particular, my ...
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1answer
108 views

What is the expected effect of pH on the activity of a fungal pectinase?

I am working on an enzyme assay for a fungal pectinase.I assayed the enzyme in different buffers from pH 1-12.5 However,the enzyme has good activities starting from pH1-10.5. Is it possible to have ...
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56 views

What is an effective method for putting on blue rubber butyl stoppers?

They look like this. We have to do a lot of gas sampling and these are really difficult to assemble. I've been scouring the internet for advice but there are none. Do you have experience with ...
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203 views

Significance of synthesis of D-glucose in plants..?

why plants can only synthesize D-glucose why not L-glucose along with D glucose. I know it very well that plants have only enzymes which can synthesize D-glucose but Why not they have enzymes which ...
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23 views

Primers on Dystonia

Where can I get a good biochemical overview of dystonia? I will be working in a research lab that focuses on dystonia and I would like to not be clueless.
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1answer
175 views

How do a particular arrangement of atoms become self aware? [closed]

At the simplest level, we're all just atoms, animals, plants and humans alike. But what I don't understand, is how a particular arrangement of atoms such as us can become self aware, and be able to ...
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1answer
56 views

Measurement of glucose concentration in the human brain

If I want to measure the exact glucose concentration in a human brain then how can I proceed to do that? Is there any technique or assay to do that?
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1answer
303 views

What is reductive deamination?

This presentation on anaerobic digestion mentions (pg. 19) two major pathways for the digestion of amino acids: Stickland reaction and reductive deamination. While I find some info on the former, what ...
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45 views

Why doesn't the avocado turn brown when it is kept with its seed?

Why doesn't the avocado turn brown when its kept with its seed? What does the seed release that slows down the oxidation process?
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1answer
39 views

Concentration of DNA by isopropanol

I have read that DNA can be concentrated by addition of isopropanol. What does "concentrated" mean? What does isopropanol do on a molecular level to concentrate DNA?
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87 views

Why only water in liquid form is essential to live?

My question is:- Only liquid water supports almost every living organism's metabolism, neither the vapour nor the condensed form of water does so. What is the chemical & the biological reason ...
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1answer
26 views

To understand synthesis of e-NOS and n-NOS with respect to Ca and calmodulin

I found this sentence in my notes interesting E-NOS and n-NOS are Ca-calmodulin dependent ferments. They are synthesized in small concentration as a response to physiological signals which ...
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1answer
4k views

What's the difference between protein and DNA behaviour during agarose gel electrophoresis?

I'm planning a science project about gel electrophoresis, and I'd like to know if there are any measurable, quantifiable (for example, things I could represent in a graph or chart) differences between ...
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1answer
91 views

Topology of protein

The domain structure of protein Z, which is composed of 180 amino acids, is shown in the upper part of the figure below. Protein Z is palmitoylated at a cysteine residue (the third amino acid) ...
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57 views

Identifying mutations in a yeast strain

Cells of a triple-mutant yeast strain (leu- his- trp-) were spread either on minimal medium or on minimal medium supplemented with various combinations of histidine, leucine, or tryptophan. The ...
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1answer
101 views

Determining limiting nutrients from a graph

The question was Which of the following statements is supported by these data? A. Phosphorus was the first limiting nutrient followed by nitrogen. B. Nitrogen was the first limiting nutrient ...
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2k views

Why is the function of lacA (encoding thiogalactoside transacetylase) not clearly understood?

It's almost half a century since the lac operon was discovered but isn't it weird that the precise role of transacetylase isn't clearly understood ? Here a wikipedia article with a link to a journal ...
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241 views

Question about production of CFTR protein

How do organelles such as ribosomes, ER, Golgi and vesicles produce CFTR protein and mucus?
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141 views

Creative ways to deactivate alpha-amylase taken from fungi

I can deactivate $\alpha$-amylase in ways such as extreme temperature controls, pH controls of the solution it stays in, or adding salt to the solution. However, are there any other unique or ...
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138 views

Hydrophilicity and polarity [closed]

If any given molecule is polar, and is capable of hydrogen bonding, I can be sure that it's hydrophilic. However, are those two the only conditions that make a molecule hydrophilic?
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77 views

Why to choose a grammar from a lot of grammars that can describe structure of proteins? [closed]

Why do we choose a grammar from a lot of grammars that can describe structure of proteins? Usually, there are a lot of (maybe infinite) grammars that can describe one language. Why do we choose a ...
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1answer
218 views

Raphide toxicity in Pothos plant

Recently I found out that the common houseplant Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) is toxic to cats and dogs due to the presence of "insoluble raphides." I have a lot of these plants around my house and my ...
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1answer
100 views

Do Acyl Carrier Proteins and Conenzyme A have similar reactivity?

In terms of the reactions they undergo are they roughly equivalent groups?
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549 views

Amino acid characteristics that determine their chemical properties?

What chemical aspect of amino acids results in their having different properties such that the chemical and physical properties of polypeptides vary with both amino acid content and amino acid order? ...
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256 views

Does the Urea Cycle exist in invertebrates?

Do invertebrates (like Drosophila and C.elegans) have a urea cycle?
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75 views

Why are nitrogenous bases of DNA hydrophobic if they can hydrogen bond?

Why are nitrogenous bases of DNA hydrophobic if they can hydrogen bond? Is it that they are only relatively hydrophobic? This forum explains it but does not give an example of the structure.
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26 views

Does ATP hydrolysis reaction have a high or low activation energy?

I was recently studying about ATP and how it functions as an energy carrier to all biological processes; however, I came across a confusing and paradoxical statement from two sources: (at 7:36) and ...
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33 views

Can Nanodiscs be used to study membrane energetics?

Nanodiscs have changed they way we can study the structures, insertion, and functions of transmembrane proteins. Below is an image of a nanodisc bilayer. The key difference, as far as I can tell, ...
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1answer
59 views

Why does my anti-ubiquitin antibody visualization not work on my PAGE gel?

I am using 2D gel electrophoresis to visualize polyubiquitinated proteins. However, while I can see actin and heat shock protein using when appropriate antibodies, I cannot visualize them using ...
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1answer
37 views

Does creatine-phosphate (CP) supplementation regenerate NADH?

I have the following facts: It is possible to convert ATP <-> creatine vice-versa. (ref - non scientific) CP supplementation protects against metabolic syndrome. ref1 ref2 Fructose digestion ...
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1answer
70 views

How is ATP involved in muscle contraction?

The sliding filament mechanism as explained by my text does not elaborate on how ATP is involved in the cross bridge binding and contraction process. How does muscle contraction utilize ATP? In my ...
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3answers
70 views

DIY storing family DNAs' samples for future uses (eg medical)

I have a question I could not get an understandable reply from Google and I am no expert in the matter, so my plead to you is if you could give me practical and relatively easy to follow advice. With ...
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1answer
65 views

Given an EC50 value, how do I reproduce the sigmoidal curve from which this was calculated?

All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) is a potent ligand for a nuclear receptor called retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARa). The concentration of atRA at which RARa is half maximal is 19nM. The dose-response ...
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1answer
19 views

Ways to cause membrane damage to microalgae and yeast?

I am researching a way to monitor the membrane damage of cells. To do that I fist have to have reference points, namely, cells with damaged membranes. I am working with Dunalliela, Hematococcus (both ...
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113 views

Why sigmoid curves appear in quantitative analysis of many biological phenomena? [closed]

I know two examples: 1-The binding of hemoglobin to oxygen (binding of oxygen to one site of hemoglobin induces conformational changes which increase the affinity of the other sites for oxygen - the ...
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1answer
40 views

Are there U-rich transcriptional pause sites?

I've heard a statement in a talk that U-rich sequences cause transcriptional pausing. The intuitive explanation for this was that the UTP concentration is lower in the cell than the ATP concentration. ...
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2answers
49 views

Conversion of glucose to glycogen

Why is excess glucose, as a glycogen, stored in only a limited amount as compared to the lipid in our body? Why is mature glycogen arranged (polymerized) in 12 tiers polymer?
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1answer
23 views

What controls Fructose regulation in plants?

Sugars are found ubiquitously in plants and are regulated. For sucrose it's pretty straightforward - it's basically kept at a low ish level, and put into storage or other intermediate compounds. ...
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41 views

What are the reactions in the body that triggers dizziness after cigar(nicotine) smoking in non-smokers?

Suppose there is a person that has never used nicotine in any form in his/her life. Why does the person get dizzy after a few "shots" from a cigar(nicotine)? What's the difference between using other ...
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1answer
50 views

All or nothing phenomena

We know that an action potential is produced by an active cell membrane when the stimulus reaches a certain threshold. When it does, an action potential fires, and when it doesn't, nothing happens. ...
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1answer
71 views

5,6-dihydrouracil and 5,6-dihydroxyuracil - how they arise in DNA?

5,6-dihydrouracil can be formed from cytosine after exposure of DNA to ionizing radiation under anoxic conditions [Ref]. What are other ways by which 5,6-dihydrouracil is formed in DNA? What about ...