The study of chemistry within the scope of biology: the compounds that occur and the reactions involving them in living organisms.

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6
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1answer
74 views

What is the biochemical explanation for tingling and burning sensation in brain due to certain food?

Consumption of mustard (spicy English Mustard), wasabi and horseradish based food dressings usually result in a burning, tingling or freezing sensation in the brain/scalp and nostrils as the vapour ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Why does my anti-ubiquitin antibody visualization not work on my PAGE gel?

I am using 2D gel electrophoresis to visualize polyubiquitinated proteins. However, while I can see actin and heat shock protein using when appropriate antibodies, I cannot visualize them using ...
3
votes
1answer
125 views

Enzyme Assay - pectinase

During assaying an enzyme at high temperature, the substrate (Pectin) is degraded by the high temperature rather than by enzyme, so, how can I minimize degradation of the substrate by the temperature? ...
3
votes
1answer
251 views

How does temperature influence the rate of protein degradation?

For computer modeling purposes, I am looking for some referenced quantitative measurements of the effect(s) of temperature on biochemical reactions. Question In particular, my question is: How does ...
2
votes
2answers
91 views

Why do many DNA solutions contain additional compounds?

DNA solubility data in only water is scarce. A previous question asked for a quantification of DNA solubility in water. It seemed like it would be easily answerable, however isn't quite that simple ...
3
votes
2answers
282 views

What does this equation about DNA replication mean?

Could someone help me understand this equation please? I found it in a paper which said that it was DNA replication, but why? $\ce{dNTP + dNMP_{n} -> dNMP_{n +1} + PPi}$ I found that dNTP means ...
2
votes
0answers
26 views

What are all of the currently known variations of the G zipper motif?

The G zipper motif is found in transmembrane proteins at an above random frequency and there are models explaining how it might help with multiple transmembrane intra-membrane helix bundle assembly. ...
3
votes
1answer
96 views

Michaelis-Menten equation type - how it is derived?

Can somebody explain how is the following differential equation found? It is about the blood alcohol content. See this article (pages 3 and 4). They say the concentration of blood alcohol ...
7
votes
0answers
85 views

What is the transmembrane 'Positive-Inside Rule' nowadays? Has the definition changed over time?

First definition. Two publications by von Heijne in 1989 and 1992 coined the 'Positive-Inside rule' and showed it's practical value in topology prediction of transmembrane helices. It was clearly ...
0
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0answers
17 views

Is it possible to measure Secondary Bile Acid Kinetics?

Is it possible to measure secondary bile acid kinetic and flux measurements in vivo? Anyone have any experience with this sort of technique?
7
votes
1answer
94 views

Is using Hidden Markov Models to find homologues sensible in abstract, short sequences?

HMM alignment tools like hhpred excel at finding subtle homologues of folded proteins that simpler scoring techniques (such those used in BLAST algorithms) would miss. I am only looking at a small ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

How is the subunit molecular weight different from the native molecular weight?

I noticed that the native molecular weight for an enzyme is different from its subunit molecular weight. Why are they different? Aren't the genes needed to express the enzyme the same in the native ...
33
votes
5answers
7k views

What does the human body use oxygen for besides the final electron acceptor in the electron transport chain?

My biology teachers never explained why animals need to breathe oxygen, just that we organisms die if we don't get oxygen for too long. Maybe one of them happened to mention that its used to make ATP. ...
30
votes
5answers
2k views

Why are there no organisms with metal body parts, like weapons, bones, and armour? (Or are there?)

Reading this question, Why are there no wheeled animals?, I wondered why no organisms seem to make use of the tensile and other strengths of metal, as we do in metal tools and constructions. I am ...
5
votes
3answers
152 views

How can a ligand be an integral membrane protein?

My background is in mathematics, and not biology, so please bear with me. I am currently working on a project involving the effects of Epidermal growth factor treatment (EGF) on cell migration. I am ...
3
votes
0answers
48 views

Can I leave BL21(DE3) cells in room temperature?

I am preparing competent cells, and I finished inoculating a single colony in SOB. It has been incubating at 37 degrees Celsius for almost 16 hours since, and it's getting very late where I live. I ...
9
votes
3answers
18k views

Why can't the brain and red blood cells use fuels other than glucose?

The question is rather straight forward: I have always been curious as to why, but cannot find an explanation online. I can imagine that the mechanism is different for each, but why does brain tissue ...
4
votes
1answer
116 views

Which are mobile and immobile elements in plants?

I am confused with this element or nutrient classification in the plants, since some authors set elements like $\ce{S}$ and $\ce{Ni}$ as mobile and other as immobile elements (Citation 1, 2, 3, 4, 5). ...
10
votes
1answer
167 views

Why does getting certain chemicals in cuts hurt?

More specifically, shampoo. What are the mechanics of detecting a noxious chemical stimulus in terms of which receptors recognise what, how do they do it, and how is this information relayed to the ...
6
votes
1answer
70 views

THYROGLOBULIN (19S) comes to a heavier position than ferritin (51S). Why?

Sedimentation values of thyroglobulin and ferritin containing iron are 19S [1] and 51S [2], respectively. But, by density gradient centrifuge, it seems thyroglobulin (19S) migrates faster than ...
3
votes
1answer
104 views

Can cats use ketone bodies as only source of energy?

I recall reading that much of the energy a cat produces from its food comes from proteins which I assume would produce energy via being catabolised into amino acids which in turn, if glucogenic, would ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Source of energy of adipocytes

Since adipocytes export fatty acids and don't use them as an energy source, which is the main source of energy for this cells?
3
votes
2answers
76 views

Tracking of oxygen molecules in glucose oxidation

For this reaction, found in typical biochemistry textbook: $C_6H_{12}O_6 + 6O_2 \to 6CO_2 + 6H_2O$ I am interested in where do the oxygen atoms of $6O_2$ go. I think they go to $6H_2O$, but this is ...
3
votes
1answer
38 views

NADH shuttles - Why cytosol?

Why is the malate-aspartate and the glycerol-3-phosphate shuttles located in the cytosol and intermembrane space? The krebs cycle happens in the matrix so why wouldn't they push electrons from the ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Beta oxidation of saturated fats

In my text book there is an example of a 18 carbon long fat and it says that it can run 8 laps of oxidation. I don't understand why it doesn't run 9? 2 are removed each cycle? Thanks.
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Help with STRING database

How can I generate a graph on the STRING web server for physical interacting proteins only? I know we could extract the data and use Cytoscape to create a graph, but I would prefer to have a graph ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Would it be possible to regulate proper phosphorylation so the UPR wouldn't initiate a reactionary cell death in important cells?

In studying the correlation of folded versus unfolded proteins and their impact on neuro-degeneration, it looks like improper phosphorylation in the chaperones (at least, in part) causes the ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

aluminum sulfate vs (NH4)2SO4 in Colloidal Coomassie Staining Sol

I have been interested in Colloidal Coomassie Staining to detect proteins in PAGE gel. I found 2 different recipes: one of them uses aluminium sulfate, the other, (NH4)2SO4. I am wondering about ...
1
vote
1answer
360 views

Calcium for Humans: Supplements vs Fortified Sources

I am intolerant to meat and milk products, but purely natural foods don't contain enough calcium for the Recommended Daily Intake. Links 2 to 4 (but NOT 1) avouch a correlation between calcium ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

How to calculate the Jaccard index [closed]

I want to calculate the Jaccard index between two compounds. What is the algorithm? I have searched for it, it just gives the formula but how to apply it on compounds is not known to me. Can you help? ...
3
votes
2answers
155 views

Which hydroxyl from either the phosphate or the glycerol is taken during synthesis of a phospholipid head?

The oxygen anion in the phosphate group is likely to be bonded with a hydrogen cation and thus forming a hydroxyl. When the phosphate group is condensed with glycerol to make a phospholipid, is the ...
5
votes
1answer
48 views

Is there a protocol for freezing and thawing Bacillus subtilis cells?

There is a book that says to store Bacillus spores in 50% glycerol at -70 degrees Celsius (doesn't mention if the 50% is final concentration or not). But from what I know, the cells themselves can be ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

What are these pathways called in Biology?

Considering the pentose phosphate pathway and the sulfate reduction pathway in bacteria; What are these types of reactions called in biology? Bio degradation reactions or bio transformation reactions ...
0
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0answers
10 views

What is isomeric threshold and isomeric count?

Found the terms isomeric point and isomeric threshold in the following paper: http://lib.gen.in/ocean/9064caa3202a71977f338ecb430280a7/10.1007%40s12539-012-0119-8.pdf It siad that the isomeric point ...
59
votes
4answers
8k views

Why 22 amino acids instead of 64?

This question got me thinking about amino acids and the ambiguity in the genetic code. With 4 nucleotides in RNA and 3 per codon, there are 64 codons. However, these 64 codons only code for 22 ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Factors on which one compound transforming to another compound depend [closed]

Considering the Metabolic Pathway: http://www.genome.jp/kegg-bin/show_module?M00166 Consider the reaction R01523(the very first reaction). How is it possible to know that the compound ...
3
votes
1answer
28 views

How exactly is glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate reverted to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate for the continuation of the calvin cycle?

Around 6 molecules of G3P is produced at the end of the Calvin Cycle (light independent reactions of photosynthesis), and 5 of which are reverted back to RuBp. The general equation that I read is 5 ...
2
votes
1answer
22 views

What is the protein sequence taken as input in the Path-A prediction system

Considering the Path-A based metabolic pathway prediction (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/content/34/suppl_2/W714.short). It uses machine learning for pathway prediction. Suppose that the input was a ...
2
votes
0answers
51 views

What effects would be caused by exposure to common life forms with opposite enantiomer biology? [closed]

Pretend a human had their body "reflected": heart on the wrong side, etc.; but also at the biochemical level: proteins, sugars, cells, DNA, everything. What would the effects be of that human's ...
6
votes
1answer
228 views

How many RNA-binding proteins can simultaneously bind on a single mRNA?

Typically, how many RNA-binding proteins can simultaneously bind to a single mRNA? Or said differently, how many "binding sites" does an mRNA have? What order of magnitude? I am interested in RNA ...
-3
votes
2answers
90 views

What is the difference between electrons and energy? [closed]

I'm studying microbiology right now and I have come across something confusing to me. I thought electrons provided energy to the cell by being incorporated into reducing powers and eventually driving ...
2
votes
1answer
23 views

Question related to L-arginine biosynthesis

With respect to the L-arginine Biosynthesis pathway, the very first reaction converts L-glutamate to N-acetyl L-glutamate. In the linked reaction scheme, why are only L-glutamate and N-acetyl ...
3
votes
1answer
43 views

What does the Gini index mean in a biochemical context?

What is the meaning of the Gini index, as specificed in this link, which describes the Gini index of beta-glucopyranose bound to hexokinase? Is this true that if Gini index has a very low value that ...
4
votes
1answer
75 views

Questions regarding a particular paper

With respect to the following paper: Automated identification of protein-ligand interaction features using Inductive Logic Programming: a hexose binding case study I have a few questions: in page ...
5
votes
1answer
62 views

How does CO₂ concentration affect photosynthesis?

I have heard the theory that with the increase of CO2 in the air, the speed of the photosynthesis would increase, thereby limiting the increase of CO2 levels. What is currently the rate limiting ...
4
votes
1answer
39 views

How does loss of the electrochemical gradient result in heat production?

As far as I understand, uncoupling of the flow of protons and ATP-synthase provides a bypass for protons between the outer and the inner membrane of mitochondria so that the protons don't have to go ...
5
votes
4answers
159 views

Any good website/book to understand protein folding and enzymes?

I'm looking for a good, understandable and simple explanation about protein folding, mechanisms and function, and their relationship with enzymes. I understand that the protein is a polypeptidic ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

What is the difference between polar and charged amino acids?

Chemically polar amino acids have an uneven (AKA polar) distribution of electrons over their surface. Charged amino acids have a charged ion in their structure. This is probably where my knowledge ...
2
votes
0answers
27 views

Does blood typing still provide a use for ancient tissue analysis?

Modern techniques. In recent years, DNA sequencing has become extremely cheap. This, compounded by the ability to PCR miniscule samples to viable samples for analysis, means that aDNA can be ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Is there a biological environment that we can we assume glutamate exists as glutamic acid?

In the body we almost always assume that glutamate exists as glutamate rather than glutamic acid. It is so commonly glutamate yet glutamic acid and glutamate share the abbreviations of Glu and E. From ...