The study of chemistry within the scope of biology: the compounds that occur and the reactions involving them in living organisms.

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How does the snail shells' fertilizer compare to regular fertilizers?

May I ask about the quality of the fertilizer derived from the shells and their effectiveness compared to other fertilizers on the market ?
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Statistically, why is the number of mutated genes in eggs treated with chemical mutagenesis one?

Excerpted from the Guide to Research Techniques in Neuroscience [1]: In chemical mutagenesis, a scientist applies a mutagenizing chemical, such as ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) or ...
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159 views

Why is ab initio protein secondary structure prediction less reliable than alternatives?

To predict secondary structure of proteins three types of Algorithms are used Ab initio, homology based and neural networks. Among these neural networks prove to be more accurate and give good results ...
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22 views

What are in common between transcription factors?

In terms of their structures (primary to tertiary) and locations? Why do they have these commonalities? Or are any of these commonalities critical to their functions?
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84 views

What is the significance to life of the anomalous properties of water? [closed]

I have heard that the anomalous properties of water - e.g the fact its solid form is less dense than its liquid form - is extremely important. In fact, some people have gone so far as to tell me it ...
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62 views
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73 views

What is the process of degradation of proteins into amino acids inside living cells?

Just like beta oxidation does our cells have a distinct mechanism for degradation of proteins? There are processes for degradation of amino acids but where does these amino acids come from, is it all ...
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147 views

Do desulfhydrase-catalysed reactions take place in animal cells?

It isn't a homework question. I'm just stuck with desulfhydrase reactions and am unable to find enough information in the usual places. Any external source on this topic would be helpful.
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38 views

Are cold-blooded animals more energy efficient than warm-blooded animals? [duplicate]

When cold-blooded animals extract energy from glucose, do they do so in a more efficient manner than warm-blooded animals? If they aren't producing heat as a by-product, that would suggest that ...
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1answer
77 views

Prediction of transmembrane beta barrels?

I studied that prediction of transmembrane alpha helices is more easy and accurate and also good algorithms are available for their prediction. But when we move towards prediction of transmembrane ...
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78 views

Getting PCR amplification at annealing higher than Tm!

I am amplifying a gene where in a gradient pcr i am getting amplification at an annealing temperature about 5 degrees (67) higher than Tm (62.5)? What is wrong here? Also, I am getting a very strong ...
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29 views

Question about DNP derivatives of amino acids (specifically epsilon-DNP-lysine)

I have a pretty basic biochemistry question but am having trouble finding the answer to it: Normally, 1-Fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB) reacts with just the amino terminus of amino acids. However, ...
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69 views

How are 6 “fixed” CO2 molecules joined toegther as glucose?

When we study calvin cycle, we study it with 6 molecules so as to form 1 glucose in a single cycle as: 6 RuBP + 6 CO2 => 12 3-PGAL => 1 Glucose + 6 RuMP But if we look deep, then we know that the ...
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How to promote denitrifying microbe activity

I'm an amateur fresh-water aquarist looking at the problem of nitrate reduction (into largely-inert nitrogen gas) in a small-scale aquarium environment. The process of turning the byproducts of fish ...
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1answer
56 views

Why do raw prawns turn red after sitting in vinegar?

Yesterday morning I put some raw prawns (shell removed) into vinegar (more specific this one), and put them in fridge. When I came back at night all of them turned red, which looks cooked, except ...
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Molecularly, why can you straighten or perm hair?

I'm aware that hair can be curly because of the disulfide bond interactions in between cysteine amino acids in alpha-keratin filaments. However, I'm curious as to the biochemistry involved in ...
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1answer
87 views

Why it seems that principles of chemistry are not being applied in this biochemical process? [closed]

According to an answer in this question, my concept used below does not apply: In the non-cyclic photophosphorylation, consider splitting of two water molecules, then 4 e- (electrons) and 4 H+ ...
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Function of NEZHA gene [closed]

What is the function of NEZHA? What effect does it have on microtubules and PLEKHA7? What happens after it has been knocked down?
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16 views

Separate replication origin and terminus vs making them one and the same

The classical picture of bacterial reproduction has a replication origin on one side of the circular chromosome and a replication termination area on the opposite end. This essentially creates two ...
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272 views

How many ATP are formed?

What is the number of ATP molecules formed during the photosynthetic processes which consume 8 molecules of $\text{H}_2\text{O}$ due to noncyclic electron transport and subsequent ...
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1answer
25 views

Concentration of a specific promoter in a cell?

I want to simulate transcription activation by a given transcription factor (TF) with known kinetics. The binding rate $k_{on}$ is given in $\mu M^{-1} s^{-1} $, describing a bimolecular reaction ...
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1answer
2k views

What is our skin made up of?

Again, it is a basic question. What is our skin made up of? is it made up of many cells arranged in a systematic way or is it just like any layer say of a book?? what is the difference? where is the ...
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24 views

Does the source of caffeine affect the biological impact?

I've recently decided to give up my morning coffee in lieu of a caffeine pill. Both are around 200mg (my Tim Horton's XL 4x4 was 240 mg of caffeine) of caffeine. We were talking about the various ...
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1answer
61 views

What do proton pump inhibitors do?

I know that sodium azide and 2,4-DNPH inhibit proton pumps. The azide is called an inhibitor and 2,4-DNP is called uncoupler. I want to know what's the difference between the mechanisms of action of ...
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1answer
39 views

amount of tRNA and its extra arm

How much of the total RNAs is tRNA? Some say 15% and some 20%. Those percentages came from my different teachers. Which is correct? And what are the functions of the extra arm (variable loop) of tRNA? ...
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42 views

Why do denatured proteins tend to be less soluble than the native protein?

Why do denatured proteins tend to be less soluble than the native protein? In terms of hydrophobic effects, could anyone explain this phenomenon for me?
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15 views

Energy efficiency of carbohydrate > fat conversion

How efficient is the human body in converting surplus carbohydrate into fat? E.g., if you have 100 calories' worth of carbohydrates at the start of the process, how many calories' worth of fat will ...
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1answer
47 views

Change in synthesis rate of a molecule changes equilibrium concentration

I was reading the topic of 'The concentration of the molecule can be adjusted quickly only if the lifetime of a molecule is short' from Molecular Biology of the Cell by Alberts. At the end of pg-837 ...
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39 views

Molecular Biology and Genetics [closed]

What's the best textbook and online courses to study Molecular biology and genetics for undergrad student?
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77 views

What came first? The DNA or the DNA polymerases?

I know this sounds a lot like chicken and egg question and while the latter has an answer, I am intrigued about the former. A modified form of the question would be, in the course of abiogenesis, ...
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302 views

What is the transmembrane 'Positive-Inside Rule' nowadays? Has the definition changed over time?

First definition. Two publications by von Heijne in 1989 and 1992 coined the 'Positive-Inside rule' and showed it's practical value in topology prediction of transmembrane helices. It was clearly ...
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Glucose to Glucose-6-phosphate [duplicate]

What does actually occur- ATP is hydrolysed and esterification between glucose and HPO4^2- (formed as a result of hydrolysis) take place to form Glucose-6-phosphate or nucleophilic attack of O- of ...
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43 views

Convert flux value in nmol/min/mg protein to nmol/min/cell?

This is a question about unit conversion. I found an experimental measurement of the saturation uptake of glucose in yeast: $$V_\textrm{max} \approx 650 \textrm{nmol}/\textrm{min}/\textrm{mg ...
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1answer
102 views

All-or-nothing-law: law or general principle?

The all-or-nothing principle indicates that a nerve cell fires at maximum potential or not at all, based on a threshold on the stimulus. Is this a statement which is always true, or only ...
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1answer
459 views

Difference between protein channels, protein carriers and protein pumps?

I'm revising for my biology exam and I don't fully comprehend the difference between protein channels, carriers and pumps. I know that: Protein channels do not require ATP (passive transport) The ...
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1answer
76 views

What causes the opaque green colour in Lepidoptera?

Link here to what I mean by 'opaque' colouration on the insect, the colour intensity remains constant despite changes in light intensity and angle (not shown by the picture but the moth exhibits this ...
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111 views

How do CAM plants keep stomata closed by day and open at night?

I understand how plants open stomata, with the H+ ion removal and the resulting K+ ion influx in the guard cells to induce turgor (wikipedia article here), though not how this process relates to ...
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1answer
80 views

Difference between negative allosteric regulation and non-competitive inhibition

Both connect to some site other than the active site which controls the shape of the active site and causes the enzyme to be less active. So what is the difference?
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Can an enzyme be activated without allosteric inhibition or activation?

Are there ways by which an enzyme may be activated or inhibited by non substrate molecules other than allosteric activation or inhibition?
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Determination of Ageing by ECG inclusions/exclusions?

I am studying ageing and considering ECG signal because of its high sensitivity in theory (escardio). Some factors Sensitivity Gender Medical treatment ... Benchmark: RTG dental + wrist ...
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Panel 9 urine/ prescribed ADDERRALL XR [closed]

My doctor conducted a Genesight test, finding out that I am an ultra rapid metabolized. Often times, my body will metabolize my medications before they enter my system. Thus is why my prescriptions, ...
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1answer
56 views

How difficult is it to make a shRNA/miRNA/siRNA to silence/knockdown NaV1.7 voltage gated sodium channels in humans?

There have been various research projects that experimented with shRNA/miRNA/siRNA to specifically silence/knockdown NaV1.7 voltage gated sodium channels in small animals like rats & guinea pigs. ...
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Equation for accurate prediction of PCR yield

It is a cliche of freshman biology labs to point out that "every cycle of PCR doubles the DNA, so the yield will be $2^{cycles}$ times the template amount". However, if this were true, 1 ng of ...
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1answer
44 views

Why is metabolism of ethanol catabolism? Could it be also detoxification?

Detoxification is the physiological or medicinal removal of toxic substances from a living organism, including the human body, which is mainly carried out by the liver. Additionally, it can refer to ...
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Is there a deblocking aminopeptidase without normal aminopeptidase activity?

The deblocking aminopeptidase is a unique exo-type aminopeptidase that liberates blocking groups (formyl, acetyl, and myristyl) from proteins and peptides. However, according to this paper, it has two ...
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1answer
49 views

What is meant by electron transfer potential?

I was reading a text and came across the term. What does it mean? The sentence said 'The driving force of oxidative phosphorylation is the electron transfer potential of NADH or FADH2 relative to that ...
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1answer
27 views

How are the two ATPs (properly 1.5 though) formed from oxidation of 1 FADH2?

Each ATP Synthase has three sites for binding three sets of ADP and Pi, so when the H+ pass through the a and c subunits are they (3 ATPs) not produced for FADH2 substrate? Besides is the ...
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Is it possible to separate the binding and catalysis of an enzyme in two steps?

Is it possible to do the following: Enzyme E binds to its substrate S without catalysis; Add a controllable stimulus, such as light, adding or removing chemicals; The enzymatic reaction is triggered ...
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194 views

At any given moment, how much energy is stored in the human body as ATP?

At any given moment, approximately how much energy is stored in the human body as ATP in the ADP-P-bond? This of course depends on what type of cell it is and the activity of the individual in ...
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What are other creatures or plants that leave “recommendations” as ants? [closed]

I'm working on a Semantic Recommendation Systems. In the state-of-the-art, I state the fact that even animals, such as ants, using some kind of recommendations by leaving markers, which are chemical ...