The study of chemistry within the scope of biology: the compounds that occur and the reactions involving them in living organisms.

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314 views

Why are enzyme-catalysed reactions slower at lower substrate concentration?

Suppose I'm using 200 nmoles of enzyme and 2 mmoles of substrate. The enzyme should be saturated but if I use 50 mmoles of substrate, the reaction will be faster. Why? I just can't get it! Even at ...
4
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1answer
573 views

Why is second pKa value of phosphoric acid different across different sources?

Am I missing something very fundamental here for phosphoric acid's second pKa value? I check the Wikipedia page and these are the values: (1) 2.148, (2) 7.198, (3) 12.377 Then I check Sigma-Aldrich ...
4
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1answer
116 views

How is respiration an unbalanced equation

The equation for respiration is C6H12O6+6O2→6CO2+6H2O+36ATP. The chemical formula for ATP is C10H16N5O13P3. How is this possible, since it violates the law of conservation of mass because it is ...
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1answer
100 views

Why plants (eg. parsley) can keep vitamin C despite all the sun?

I have read that vitamin C is highly sensitive to light. So, how could parsley, for instance keep its vitamin C as it's flooded with sunlight?
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1answer
102 views

Are there any websites offering graphs for the light absorption of different enzymes?

I have found graphs for the light absorption of water, haemoglobin, lipids, melanin, etc., but I am having a hard time finding graphs about enzymes. Are there any websites or other reference sources ...
4
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1answer
466 views

Why are omega-3 fatty acids so easily oxidized when they're incorporated in cellular membranes?

Apparently, this has led to results with clinical significance, as we can see at http://extremelongevity.net/2011/10/03/daily-fish-oil-consumption-may-reduce-lifespan/... The researchers fed a ...
4
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1answer
76 views

What makes alcohol harmful to mammals?

During the alcohol metabolic pathway, harmful by-products are made like acetaldehyde, hydroxyethyl, superox­ide anions, and hydroxyl radicals. How do these toxic compounds harm our tissues? Many of ...
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1answer
142 views

Cloning two fluorescent proteins with different promoters in the same plasmid?

I want to clone two fluorescent proteins both driven by different promoters in a plasmid to be used to transform B. subtilis at the amyE locus. For this I want to use plasmid pSG1729 (Lewis and ...
4
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1answer
103 views

How do you store membrane proteins?

We're producing some membrane proteins and they aren't amenable to freeze thaws even when we add glycerol. The proteins are solubilized in detergent above the cmc so they should be in micelle form in ...
4
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1answer
835 views

Conversion rate of topical Retinol to Retinoic Acid (Tretinoin)?

I'm wondering if someone out there has more information than me. Retinoids have well known metabolic pathways in vivo, and it's usually something like: ...
4
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1answer
244 views

Are there any intersections between the biochemical pathways of uracil biosynthesis (or metabolism) and methionine degradation in eukaryotes?

Is there any way in which uracil biosynthesis or metabolism could help cell in degradation of toxic levels of methionine?
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2answers
374 views

Why does Glutamine have the symbol Q?

Spent a half hour googling this and the best I could find was this: Now for some rhymes: Arginine = R. R we having fun yet? Asparagine = N The kNights of Ne say "Ne". Glutamine is a cute ...
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3answers
94 views

More entropy: Atom or Macromolecule? [closed]

A question that appeared on my last exam was : Which of the following has greater entropy A) An atom B) A macromolecule The question doesn't specify anything else(i.e. type/size of atom or ...
3
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1answer
380 views

Why is funnel web spider venom so lethal to humans and not so much for other mammals?

According to the information from this article, People and other primates are exquisitely sensitive to funnel web venom but, intriguingly, other mammals such as mice, rabbits, guineapigs, dogs ...
3
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3answers
391 views

Why do neurones use chemical signalling at synaptic junctions?

Problem. When a neurone fires, it sends an electrical signal that jumps down the axon via the nodes of Ranvier very rapidly. At a synaptic junction, chemical brownian diffusion signalling with ...
3
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2answers
364 views

Can any one reaction in a cell be at equilibrium?

I know that metabolism as a whole can never be at equilibrium (otherwise the cell is dead !) but I wonder whether a few reactions in the cell could be at chemical equilibrium at a given point of ...
3
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1answer
587 views

What is DNA binding domain? It is not clear what the domain means

I am confused about the term DNA binding domain. Does it mean that there are some parts of the DNA that tends to coil up? Does it happen because some proteins tend to stick around that area? Also it ...
3
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3answers
682 views

Histidine aromaticity

I understand that the imidazole ring in histidine is aromatic. I also realize that it retains it's aromaticity when protonated. I am wondering why it is not mentioned at all in basic text books such ...
3
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1answer
32 views

Function of heparin and dextran sulfate for removing proteins

From this article : The reaction was terminated and the histones, and most nonhistones, were removed by adding the nuclease-treated chromosomes to a solution containing dextran sulfate (2 ...
3
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1answer
192 views

Can replication occur if DNA is methylated?

Can a methylated strand of DNA be replicated without removing methylation? Does it make any difference if the strand is methylated or not (during replication)?
3
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2answers
56 views

How does guanidium denature DNA?

Guanidium salts like (G-isothiocyanate) disrupt the hydrophobic interactions inside a protein or nucleic acid and denature it. What happens when hydrophobic interactions in DNA are broken? (I don't ...
3
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1answer
46 views

Significance of lipids in biological membranes…?

Membranes are specifically designed by lipids to maintain internal hydrophilic environment in narrow range.There are hydrophobic amino acids among naturally occurring 20 amino acids and as well as ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Why is FADH2 made instead of NADH in one of the reaction of Krebs cycle?

FADH2 is made in conversion of Succinate to Fumarate. Why is this so ? Why not NADH ?
3
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1answer
147 views

Negative feedback in the fructose metabolism in liver

What happens in liver when large amount of fructose is consumed? I vaguely remember my biochemistry lecturer telling us that the enzymes that process fructose in the liver does not have negative ...
3
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1answer
1k views

What are the units of Q10 (temperature sensitivity)?

Q10 is the increase in a rate (e.g. activity of an enzyme) observed with a 10 degree temperature increase. According to Wikipedia: It is apparent that the units of R (e.g. mol/g/s) cancel out, ...
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1answer
304 views

Does caffeine increase the speed at which sperm travels?

I'm not even sure if this claim is true, but... This source states that Caffeine gives both types of sperm a boost, but the Y-sperm would get a little more of a boost. This article reinforces ...
3
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1answer
299 views

Troubleshooting bioconjugates migration in a SDS-PAGE gel?

We do a lot of bioconjugation chemistry (click chemistry in particular but also NHS and Maleimide chemistries). Our method to valid the conjugation reactions have been to use SDS-PAGE gels followed ...
3
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1answer
53 views

Amino acid profile of GPCRs

You are studying cellular signalling through a newly identified GPCR. Specifically you’re working on a pair of newly identified GPCRs, GPCR-A and GPCR-B. Each binds the same small ligand, but ...
3
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1answer
258 views

Is there an optimal composition and length for protein linkers in FRET?

I'm designing a protein that I'd like to use in FRET reporting. General idea on the shape is: FRETprotein1--Linker--CleavageSite--Linker--FRETprotein2. I would like to know what AA are best for the ...
3
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1answer
102 views

Are similar smells usually based on similar chemicals?

Building off of this question: Why does freshly cut grass smell like a watermelon?, is it usually the case that things that we perceive as having similar smells are, in fact, the same or a similar ...
3
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1answer
130 views

What molecular processes are involved in pseudopodial extension?

I am curious as to the processes and mechanisms involved in the extension of pseudopodia in amoeba. How does the cell know and control the direction and extent of pseudopodia formation at a molecular ...
3
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2answers
183 views

What software is there available for Quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) pharmacological studies?

QSAR modelling in pharmacology basically hangs on using mathematical modelling to approximate the effects different molecules will have on various pharmacological targets. I would like to know what ...
3
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1answer
116 views

Can compounds be predicted from Polyketide synthases gene clusters?

I've seen a few talks on the subject. From a gene cluster, there is some decent ability to determine which domains contribute to certain functional groups in the final metabolites. It sounds like this ...
3
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1answer
259 views

Ammonium sulphate precipitation assay pH dependence

In general does the pH effect the precipitation, e.g. would a pH of 6 cause less precipitation than pH 7.5. Or are they unrelated?
3
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1answer
47 views

What is the film that covers the tongue?

What is the film that covers the tongue in the mornings, even after brushing the teeth and tongue the night before and why does it have color variations? Do the different colors mean anything?
3
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1answer
596 views

How does blue white screening work in selecting E coli that have taken up a plasmid vector?

The plasmid vector I am referring to is pCR 2.1 - TOPO. I added the vector to the E coli and plated them up onto LB+amp+X-gal plate, then incubated. After incubation the plates had two types of ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Simple diffusion of lipid-soluble molecules through phospholipid bilayer — does anything get “stuck” in transit?

It's a pretty elementary concept, and when I first learned of it I don't think I had the foundations to even think of such a question, but I found myself the other day thinking about the amphipathic ...
3
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1answer
237 views

How do multiple replication forks function without 'colliding', and what is the benefit of this method?

I'm currently reading a little about DNA replication, and have come accross the following statement; Replication starts from a fixed point and is bi-directional ... In Eukaryotes, there are ...
3
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1answer
46 views

How can you improve solubility of colloidally dispersed substances?

If you solve collidally dispersed substances then the particles can form large colloids. This may block narrow passages and diffusion into dense structures may become completely impossible. What can ...
3
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1answer
18 views

bacterial cell wall degradation in humans

can human degrade the D-amino acid present in bacterial cell wall, I'm confused about it i have read somewhere that human can do so.If yes than why we need antibiotic to kill bacteria???If it is not ...
3
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1answer
49 views

How to recognize a conserved motifs of the protein

I would like ensure that my reasoning is correct. Assuming that I know the aminoacids sequence of the protein of interest. I can't say anything about the structure looking only at the aminoacids ...
3
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1answer
44 views

Why is brown fat brown?

I read in Tortora and Derrickson Anatomy and Physiology that : Another type, called brown adipose tissue obtains its darker color from a very rich blood supply , along with numerous pigmented ...
3
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1answer
34 views

Dimerization of Immunoglobulin G

I would like to know the specific determinants for formation of IgG dimers. My understanding is the stem of the antibody is a homodimer of two heavy chains, covalently bonded through two disulfide ...
3
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2answers
51 views

Why do humans circulate monosaccharides instead of disaccharides as in plants?

Plants transport food mostly in the form of disaccharides like sucrose but humans transport them in the form of a monosaccharide - glucose. What is the reason behind this ?
3
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1answer
101 views

Classification of glycosidic anomeric bonds (alpha vs. beta)

In the process of studying for my upcoming biochemistry exam, I have stumbled over the classification of glycosidic bonds. I want to be able to distinguish $\alpha$- from $\beta$-glycosidic bonds. ...
3
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1answer
46 views

Common Ancestry of ETCs and ATP Synthase complexes

Rickettsiales are widely regarded as the ancestor of eukaryotic mitochondria through endosymbiosis. Cyanobacteria are widely regarded as the ancestor of eukaryotic chloroplasts through endosymbiosis. ...
3
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2answers
77 views

Humidity for wood rotting

If I put a piece of wood in a humid environment (basically humid air), it will start to rot. Does the humidity influence the rotting speed, and if so, what is the relation between the rotting speed ...
3
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2answers
90 views

Which hydroxyl from either the phosphate or the glycerol is taken during synthesis of a phospholipid head?

The oxygen anion in the phosphate group is likely to be bonded with a hydrogen cation and thus forming a hydroxyl. When the phosphate group is condensed with glycerol to make a phospholipid, is the ...
3
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3answers
117 views

Are there any methods to quantify H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) which don't rely on horseradish peroxidase?

I can't use HRP since my substrates interfere with it and I need a real-time method because I want to measure kinetic parameters of some oxidases.
3
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1answer
65 views

What is the translation termination efficiency in mammalian cells?

When I express proteins in bacteria I put at least two stop codons at the end of the gene to increase the termination efficiency. Is this the case in eukaryotic cells too? If I put a single stop codon ...