The study of chemistry within the scope of biology: the compounds that occur and the reactions involving them in living organisms.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
2answers
255 views

Polysaccharide vs Macromolecule

I'm having trouble understanding the difference between Polysaccharide and Macromolecule. I know that polysaccharides are made of chains of monosaccharides. In addition, I know that ...
3
votes
1answer
130 views

How do lipid-soluble substances diffuse through the cell membrane?

It’s said that water-soluble substances can diffuse through cell membrane with less ease than lipid-soluble substances because the former encounters impedance in the hydrophobic region of the ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

Why would growth hormone (somatotropin) cause both lipid AND glucose release?

GH increases lipolysis (lipid breakdown) and the release of fatty acids from adipocytes into the blood. Fatty acids then can be used as energy sources to drive chemical reactions, including ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

How much is the normal range of thiol/protein (mol/mol) concentration?

HSA(Human Serum Albumin) has just one free thiol group on Cys34. Using DTNB assay I obtained 0.4 thiol/protein (mol/mol) for this protein. I wonder if this value is a reliable number or not? does ...
2
votes
0answers
74 views

Proteases in the blood

I’m reading on hormones and the book talks about how peptide or amine hormones are easily broken down by proteases present in the blood plasma. This has led me to question the interactions between ...
7
votes
2answers
96 views

Permeability of Plasma Membrane

I’m having trouble grasping why small polar molecules can cross the hydrophobic region of the membrane and not ions. Won’t the polar molecules be attracted to the watery extracellular medium and not ...
2
votes
1answer
288 views

Why do mice have a higher metabolism?

Mice and other small animals have higher metabolic rate than humans. How does that happen on cellular level, if we look on one cell in the mouse body? What is it in this cell that will be ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Is it possible to measure in vivo enzyme kinetics?

I was wondering is there way in which we can measure enzyme kinetics in vivo specifically for enzymes acting on lipid substrates (where substrate is restricted to 2D membrane as oppose to freely ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

All-trans-retinal being converted back to 11-cis-retinal or vitamin A

There are two pathways all-trans-retinal can take after detaching from the scotopsin: (1) it can convert back to 11-cis-retinal, or (2) it can convert to all-trans-retinol (form of vitamin A), which ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

How is the enzyme glycogen synthase regulated?

How is the enzyme glycogen synthase regulated in regards to glycogen synthesis? I think I understand that phosphorylation decreases its activity (through glycogen synthase kinase?), but what role do ...
3
votes
1answer
85 views

What is the shortest mRNA the ribosome can read to produce a peptide?

This question came as a comment on a previous question regarding non-ribosomal peptide synthesis, and why Glutathione cannot be synthesized by the ribosome. In general, Glutathione has a "gamma" ...
5
votes
2answers
253 views

Why does depolarisation by high intracellular K+ trigger calcium channels opening?

I have learnt that in pancreatic beta cells, glucose being metabolised in the cell causes a high ATP level, which triggers ATP-dependent potassium channels to close. This means that potassium can't ...
5
votes
2answers
136 views

Non-ribosomal peptide synthesis: why Glutathione cannot be produced by the ribosome?

Case: I am writing a summary for a class in protein structure and function, and was asked to describe some different ways that peptides are synthesized (that does not involve the ribosome). I ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Why would a bacterial population show initial growth when it is in unfavorable growth conditions?

This figure shows the anaerobe E. faecalis grown in aerobic conditions, E. coli grown in restricted conditions that are not specified. Why do they show an increase in abundance initially? The black ...
2
votes
1answer
228 views

Anomalous base pairing of nucleotide tautomers

What tautomers base pair with what bases? I know that adenine pairs with thymine and guanine pairs with cytosine normally. My question is what does the imino form of adenine base pair with? Regular ...
1
vote
1answer
96 views

Is there an evolutionary advantage for coconut oils to be rich in saturated fats?

I know that coconut oil is composed of multiple saturated fatty acids, but is there a reason why this would have increased the fitness of the coconut plant?
0
votes
0answers
18 views

What exactly are polyphenols and what benefits do they provide to humans?

I say somewhere that they are antioxidants, but I was wondering if the two terms are synonymous or if that is just one of many things polyphenols can do.
0
votes
1answer
62 views

On which amino-acids residue is the SDS acting on?

I would like to know exactly what is the mechanisme of the SDS, and I would like to know on which amino-acids residue the SDS is acting on. Can you help me please ? Thank you in advance !
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Difference between the P4 and P5 subtypes of P-type ATPases in plants

In plants there are various kinds of P-type ATPases. What is difference between P4-ATPase and P5-ATPase?
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Is Roundup toxic?

Roundup, as we all know, is a herbicide that kills weeds. It does this by preventing the production of amino acids in plants. One of these amino acids is tyrosine. Tyrosine is a nonessential amino ...
2
votes
1answer
884 views

Why does NAD+ become reduced if it gains a hydrogen proton?

I've heard that $NAD^+$ gains a Hydrogen proton during glycolysis and the Krebs cycle and becomes reduced to $NADH$. However, isn't reduction when a molecule receives an electron? Maybe I've been ...
5
votes
1answer
199 views

What are 'acid stable' amino acids?

I tend to see terms amino acid, acid stable amino acid, and free amino acids used often in ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Which Lactobacillales (Lactic acid bacteria — LAB) strains are capable of degrading starch?

I've been researching bacteria strains but am having trouble finding amylolytic LAB strains with amylolytic and lactic acid producing character. The only species I've found, that are capable of ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

kinetics question [closed]

An enzyme has a $V_{max}$ of 50 $\mu$mol product formed $(min * \text{mg protein})^{-1}$ and a $K_m$ of 10 $\mu$M for the substrate. When a reaction mixture contains the enzyme and a 5$\mu$M ...
1
vote
1answer
133 views

Bradford Reagent Disposal

I am a graduate student volunteering in a professor's lab being tasked with finding out how to dispose of certain hazardous materials. I have encountered a problem with disposing of Bradford's ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

metabolism preference by the body

What I know about metabolism is that,during exercise body uses carbohydrate first then fats and then protein,so my question is why does body prefer glucose first as fuel for energy and what makes ...
0
votes
2answers
424 views

Is it possible to stop yourself from going into shock?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shock_(circulatory) I was helping someone move a refrigerator down steps and it slipped while I was holding a sharp corner and it sliced my finger and there was ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

Where does the inverse seconds unit come from in the association constant?

I'm working to determine Kd(s) kinetically by generating association and disassociation curves. Kon (association constant, or on-rate) is in inverse seconds multiplied by inverse molar. I get that ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

What cures pineapple burns?

If you already ate too much bromelain in pineapple, how do you cure your tongue burn?
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Is there a good easy protocol for extracting proteins(enzymes) from fungal mycelium?

I quantify the enzyme (polygalacturanase)activity by DNSA method.To determine endo-polygalacturonase activity I'm searching for a good easy enzyme extracting method.Any suggestions for a suitable ...
0
votes
1answer
70 views

which organelle produce glycogen phosphorylase and why

I know that Glycogen phosphorylase doesn't produce from rough endoplasmic reticulum in liver cell. But almost every proteins such as insulin receptor, serum albumin, and lysosomal enzyme have to ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

Growth of Yeast in Different pH Mediums

Will yeast grow better in acidic, basic or neutral mediums? Why? Will the medium affect the growth of yeast? (Yeast cell membrane is semi-permeable).
1
vote
2answers
75 views

What are the differences between carnitine forms?

I've heard of L-carnitine, acetyl L-carnitine and L-carnitine L-tartrate. What form(s) occur in meat? What form does the human body manufacture? Is L-carnitine just a shortened name for L-carnitine ...
1
vote
1answer
110 views

What do the numbers in Photosystem I P700 and Photosystem II P680 stand for? Is it the optimum wavelenght? The maximum wavelenght?

I am a bit confused about this because my teacher and english Wikipedia say it's the wavelenght the Photosystem is most reactive to; my textbook and the german Wikipedia say that it is the maximum ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Question about Collagen and Glycosylation

Just curious, I know that collagen typically undergoes O type glycosylation. However, can you say that this type of glycosylation is essentially like putting a mailing address for proteins to be ...
1
vote
1answer
204 views

Why does SDS-PAGE use for protein, and agarose use for nucleic acid?

My question maybe very primary, but after I learned this part, questions always follow me. SDS-PAGE gel works for detect protein, agarose gel works for detect nucleic acid, so here is my question: 1. ...
3
votes
1answer
177 views

Membrane Permeability to Pyruvate

Pyruvate seems to pass easily through the outer membrane of the mitochondrion but has difficulty entering the inner membrane (and gets in by H+ symport). I have two questions: (1) what property of ...
2
votes
1answer
466 views

How to find the concentration of an enzyme?

I need to know the concentration of pectinase enzyme (sigma aldrich) which has stated 5KU, 5U/mg protein (lowry) and lot result 20U/mg protein in the label of the enzyme bottle. This is all it has ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Making positive charged polyacrylamide

I am interested in positive charged polyacrylamide to electrophorese molecules I am interested in. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2643323/ ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Birth control hormones in the water? Or not?

This prior question talks about natural estrogen (TL;DR: Months to years): How quickly do estrogens break down in the environment? Ref: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/485441a A lot of media has said, ...
2
votes
3answers
860 views

Do we consume dna, proteins of other organisms?

When we eat raw meat, e.g. chicken or fish, we are actually consuming the DNA, proteins etc. which are present in their cells. Wouldn't this affect our cell functions as this DNA might enter our ...
5
votes
1answer
262 views

Why is it often the case that an enzyme is favorable only towards one direction of a reaction and not both directions?

In class when we're studying enzymes like amylase or protease it only works well when you're using it to break down compounds like polysaccharides. I'm just curious but why is it not possible for ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

What is a detailed chemical explanation for describing how an enzyme may lower the activation energy of a reaction?

If you can provide some sound reasoning that touches on tertiary structures of proteins and does not use a lot of advanced chemistry jargon that might be really helpful, especially for an intro ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Fibronectin glass surface adsorption

Short summary I'm having a glass surfaces and I want to adsorb proteins onto them. I have no problem, when I first adsorb fibronectin (human) onto some areas and afterwards any other protein. The ...
2
votes
1answer
146 views

What is a mechanical cue?

I was attending a talk related to neurogenesis. So one professor was asking a question related to biochemical cues and mechanical cues (related to signaling pathways I believe). Cue as far as I ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Soy kefir that never revitalises in animal milk

If I have kefir grains from goat and I make soy kefir and never revitalise the kefir grains in an animal milk, will that bacteria still be beneficial for the gut? What type of bacteria does it make? ...
1
vote
1answer
148 views

How will changing the concentration of a Tris buffer affect amylase enzyme activity?

For instance if you increase the amount of Tris but pH still does not change then will the enzyme activity still proceed normally? If it does change the pH will it change enzyme structure and why?
3
votes
2answers
132 views

How do muscle cells synthesize glycogen?

Hexokinase enzyme is present in all cells (including muscle cells) and can be suppressed by excessive G-6-P product. So that's why in the liver, glucokinase can act on glucose without inhibition of it ...
0
votes
0answers
78 views

Root etiology of non-pituitary low T4 and low TSH

Please note: I'd like to preface this question by stating that this is neither homework nor me seeking medical advice. I am simply trying to understand the biological, physiological root etiology ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Consumption of different type of energy when one is inactive

I'm wonder if there is any study done on this and what are the results? how much of each type of energy one's body(healthy normal person) uses when inactive(seating down) I know there are alot of ...