The study of chemistry within the scope of biology: the compounds that occur and the reactions involving them in living organisms.

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Why is it often the case that an enzyme is favorable only towards one direction of a reaction and not both directions?

In class when we're studying enzymes like amylase or protease it only works well when you're using it to break down compounds like polysaccharides. I'm just curious but why is it not possible for ...
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84 views

What is Colloidal biology and does it have any scientific background?

There is the following bulletin published for the History of Chemistry Vol. 32: 105-118 in 2007: “MOLECULAR” VERSUS “COLLOIDAL”: CONTROVERSIES IN BIOLOGY AND BIOCHEMISTRY, 1900–1940* written by PhD ...
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109 views

Scale up of Bacterial growth from 250mL to 1-5L?

I am currently growing up a specific strain of E.Coli with a knockout in 40mL of growth medium (LB) in a 250mL shaker flask... My ultimate goal is to scale up this process to a 1-5L large scale setup ...
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Equation for accurate prediction of PCR yield

It is a cliche of freshman biology labs to point out that "every cycle of PCR doubles the DNA, so the yield will be $2^{cycles}$ times the template amount". However, if this were true, 1 ng of ...
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128 views

enzymes that stabilize DNA loops

As a follow-up of a previous question, I would like to know what enzymes or protein complexes have been used to manipulate DNA samples into stabilizing DNA loops. I have read that cohesin is one of ...
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67 views

How do rodenticides with delayed effect work?

Most modern rodenticides are claimed to cause death no earlier than several days after ingestion. That's quite strange - once a chemical was ingested it will be absorbed in the digestive system and ...
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100 views

In which way would the yeast cell cope with the excess amount of methionine in the growth media?

I guess that when there is surplus of methionine in the cell it is incorporated in the TCA cycle as a succinyl CoA, with cysteine as a by-product. But now the cell has the surplus of cysteine. What ...
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254 views

Are quaternary protein monomers unique to a particular protein complex?

I know that quaternary protein structures are formed exclusively via non-covalent bonds. My biochemistry professor discussed a viral capsid that is essentially one quaternary structure with 240 ...
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102 views

Non-ribosomal peptide synthesis: why Glutathione cannot be produced by the ribosome?

Case: I am writing a summary for a class in protein structure and function, and was asked to describe some different ways that peptides are synthesized (that does not involve the ribosome). I ...
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118 views

Is there a protocol for freezing and thawing Bacillus subtilis cells?

There is a book that says to store Bacillus spores in 50% glycerol at -70 degrees Celsius (doesn't mention if the 50% is final concentration or not). But from what I know, the cells themselves can be ...
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60 views

Do non-enzyme catalysed reaction pathways exist?

Can their be a kind of chemical reaction pathway in a cell, that is catalyzed or regulated but NOT necessarily by enzymes? I could not find anything on Google. I have almost no background in biology, ...
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119 views

Photolysis of Water?

In chemistry, I studied the decomposition of water as being $2H_2O_{(l)} \rightarrow 2H_{2(g)} + O_{2(g)}$. However, when water is split, the equation is $2H_2O_{(l)} \rightarrow 4H^+ + 4e^- ...
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97 views

How does the body “know” how to metabolize foreign substances

As a freshman biochemistry major, I find myself befuddled by our body's ability to perform complex chemical reactions to break down foreign substances. I can see how we would evolve explicit pathways ...
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91 views

Examples of genes involved in plastic responses

Adaptive plasticity involves sensing the environment and responding adaptively to it. Intuitively, I would think that this process may ask for a more or less complex genetic machinery of regulation of ...
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1k views

How does water buffer a sudden drop in temperature?

A property of water is that it is slow to heat and cool. According to my biology book, some energy from an increase in temperature would spent breaking hydrogen bonds, so that temperature does not ...
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76 views

At any given moment, how much energy is stored in the human body as ATP?

At any given moment, approximately how much energy is stored in the human body as ATP in the ADP-P-bond? This of course depends on what type of cell it is and the activity of the individual in ...
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73 views

How do single-celled predators chase other cells?

From my understanding, single celled organisms have been seen avoiding, and chasing, potential food or other organisms. How do they accomplish this? They do not have eyes or ears or a nervous system. ...
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207 views

Are there ways to speed up the growth of plants?

I'm interested in what humans can do to speed up the rate of growth in a plant. I'm interested in both the context of home gardening and large-scale, institution-backed projects. Obviously, optimal ...
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777 views

Using ion-exchange chromatography to purify DNA from a cell extract - Is DNA more negatively charged then RNA?

When applying this method we have a glass or plastic column of resin which is positively charged. Then we pour cell extract into the column in order to capture the negatively charged particles which ...
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SDS Laemmli Gel that did not solidify [closed]

In my lab class this week my partner and I were making a SDS-PAGE Laemmli Gel. We made the resolving gel solution which was made of 30% Acrylamide, DI water, 1.5 M Tris-HCL pH8.8, and 20% SDS. We ...
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When is Water Produced During Photosynthesis?

The formula for photosynthesis is: $$6CO_2+12H_2O \rightarrow C_6H_{12}O_6+6O_2+6H_2O$$ I can count the carbons, the waters on the reactant side, the oxygens, and the glucose, but I cannot seem to ...
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213 views

Amino acid compatibility

The (human) genetic code encodes 20 amino acids. They form a protein using peptide bonds. Each amino acid has a carboxyl group (COOH) and an amino group (NH2) that can potentially form a peptide bond. ...
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Why are human titin and mice titin considered the same protein?

I have a book that says: In humans titin is a chain of 34,350 amino acids, but in mice it is even longer with 35,213 amino acids. If two polypeptides had different amino acid sequence lengths, ...
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618 views

In biosynthesis of cysteine and methionine, where does the sulfur come from?

Methionine and Cysteine are the two amino acids containing sulfur. According to wikipedia, cysteine is built from methionine. However, the wikipedia also claims that methionine is synthesized from ...
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Why do neurones use chemical signalling at synaptic junctions?

Problem. When a neurone fires, it sends an electrical signal that jumps down the axon via the nodes of Ranvier very rapidly. At a synaptic junction, chemical brownian diffusion signalling with ...
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171 views

Do acetyl-CoA, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and acetyl-glutamate carry any charge?

Do the following compounds have any charge? If not, then why? If yes, is there any database that would give me this information if the compound is negatively or positively charged? The compounds are ...
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249 views

Effect of testosterone hormone on cell signalling and behaviour?

A steroid, testosterone was injected in female body which led to development of secondary sexual characters but these characters were not developed over night (Response was very slow). What could be ...
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221 views

What makes a metal safe to use for an artificial joint?

What determines if a metal is suitable for transplantation such as in the hip? What I am most interested in however is why might some metals be toxic to animals once in the body?
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481 views

Water soluble molecules

I believe I may have misunderstood water solubility this entire time. I assumed that water soluble meant that it would literally dissolve in water. It would break down into atoms. A sugar molecule ...
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482 views

Are there dangers to Teflon and aluminium cookware?

I've been reading some articles on the internet about dangers of Teflon and aluminium to the body. My family say I'm just exaggerating the situation, and maybe I am, though I'm not sure because not ...
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99 views

Why isn't there any repulsive force between Na+ and K+ disrupting thier roles in transmembrane voltage/ action potentials

Pretty self explanatory question. I have a basic grasp on the "How" and "Why" of Reversal/Action Potential in and between neurons, but this question lingers.
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210 views

Is ATP Synthase a channel or an enzymatic protein?

Today in a biology lecture about plasma membranes and functions of proteins, we learned about channel and enzymatic proteins along other kinds of proteins. ATP synthase is considered an enzyme that ...
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What is our skin made up of?

Again, it is a basic question. What is our skin made up of? is it made up of many cells arranged in a systematic way or is it just like any layer say of a book?? what is the difference? where is the ...
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321 views

Stability of helical strands of DNA?

The DNA molecules contain phosphate groups involved in $3'\rightarrow 5'$phosphodiester linkages. These groups, in the bonded state with deoxyribose, contain 1 negative charges ($\ce{3'-PO4^{-}-5'}$). ...
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Why don't amino acids get linked in the functional groups of acidic and basic amino acids?

There are 'acidic' and 'basic' amino acids like aspartate and histidine. When protein is synthesized with those amino acids, what ensures that the to-be-assembled amino acids will not bond to the ...
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Why is FADH2 made instead of NADH in one of the reaction of Krebs cycle?

FADH2 is made in conversion of Succinate to Fumarate. Why is this so ? Why not NADH ?
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Why is metabolism of ethanol catabolism? Could it be also detoxification?

Detoxification is the physiological or medicinal removal of toxic substances from a living organism, including the human body, which is mainly carried out by the liver. Additionally, it can refer to ...
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196 views

Proteins that give color (without fluorescence)

Is there proteins that have strong color, that could be seen without the need of UV and with naked eyes (with white light) - in mammalian cells? Searching for reporter, something like GFP, but that ...
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71 views

Phospholipid movement in cell membranes

What causes phospholipids to flow so quickly in cell membranes? In Biology by Cambell et al. they state that a phospholipids can travel up to 2 micrometers per second. Is that a random movement or has ...
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261 views

which signalling pathway is involved in cancer?

Columnar epithelial cells from the colonic mucosa are studied to identify abnormalities in cell signaling pathways. Abnormal epithelial cells from colonic adenocarcinoma are shown to have a mutation ...
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351 views

Signaling through G protein Coupled Receptors?

There are two different cell lines but we do not know that these cell lines have Gs or Gi proteins, associated with their G-protein coupled receptors. If we wants to know about this. Can we design a ...
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189 views

Significance of lipids in biological membranes…?

Membranes are specifically designed by lipids to maintain internal hydrophilic environment in narrow range.There are hydrophobic amino acids among naturally occurring 20 amino acids and as well as ...
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286 views

How does ethanol interact with insulin?

I know that ethanol increases insulin secretion--could someone explain why? All I have found till now is experimental data analyses. I am interested in mechanism of alcohol consumption.
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Negative feedback in the fructose metabolism in liver

What happens in liver when large amount of fructose is consumed? I vaguely remember my biochemistry lecturer telling us that the enzymes that process fructose in the liver does not have negative ...
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189 views

How does decreasing surface tension of lipids help to emulsify them?

According to my chemistry book, water has higher surface tension than lipids. But in my biology book it is written that "the gall forms an emulsion of water and lipids by lowering the lipid's surface ...
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How exactly is glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate reverted to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate for the continuation of the calvin cycle?

Around 6 molecules of G3P is produced at the end of the Calvin Cycle (light independent reactions of photosynthesis), and 5 of which are reverted back to RuBp. The general equation that I read is 5 ...
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49 views

How does loss of the electrochemical gradient result in heat production?

As far as I understand, uncoupling of the flow of protons and ATP-synthase provides a bypass for protons between the outer and the inner membrane of mitochondria so that the protons don't have to go ...
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Cellular Respiration/Fermentation Problem Leading to Lack of Energy

A young animal has never had much energy. He is brought to a veterinarian for help and is sent to the animal hospital for some tests. There they discover his mitochondria can use only fatty acids and ...
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What's the maximum pressure inside a bombardier beetle?

This question got me wondering about the pressure inside a bombardier beetle. Lots of articles mention pressure, but don't specify the amount of it: One study records the velocity of the spray to ...
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What is a triglyceride?

I'm confused on what a triglyceride is, from what my text book it says its a type of gylercide, then from a website it said Glycerides can be subdivided into two categories. The first group, the ...