The study of plant life; e.g. angiosperms, gymnosperms, bryophytes, pteridophytes, and algae.

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Does using fertiliser reduce the energy required for active transport in plants, for the ion in question

Apologies if this belongs in the chemistry stack exchange. I was just wondering if it did, as carrier proteins require energy to get a particular ion into the plant.But does it take more energy in ...
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1answer
22 views

Pollinator mating system in orchids

I came across three terms in an article on pseudocopulation. However I don't quite understand what it means. They are: 1) solitary and haplodiploid 2) social and haplodiploid 3) diploid These ...
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31 views

Accelerated tree growth [on hold]

Can someone explain to me the growth of a redwood tree after it is cut just above the ground, if that happens at all? Also if it does, what would it look like during an exponential growth spurt, but ...
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How many cells in apical meristem

How many cells are there in the apical meristematic tissue? Looking at this picture... I would tend to think that there are few hundreds (maybe only a hundred) cells in the meristem tissue. But I ...
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1answer
138 views

Sporophyte and gametophyte

My textbook says that in both groups of seedless plants (vascular plants, non-vascular plants) the gametophyte is a free-living plant, independent of the sporophyte. I don't understand this statement ...
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893 views

Does cooking or ripening reduce the concentration of solanine in nightshade?

I recall a story from one of my Botany professors where he encountered a woman picking Solanum dulcamara (nightshade) berries. When he asked her what she was doing with them, she responded that her ...
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31 views

Somatic Mutations in meristem tissue in plants

In angiosperm, in which layer of the meristem does a new mitotic mutation occurring has chance to be found in a pollen grain or in an ovule? I also welcome some insights about non-angiosperm plants.
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Minerals and water transportion in a tree [on hold]

I need to explain how minerals and water are first absorbed and then transported in a tree. Include the factors that affect this.
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27 views

Transport of organics in a tree [on hold]

I need to explain what happens during the transport of organics in a tree in early spring before the leaves are present.
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22 views

The biology behind tree pruning and hedge trimming

I read two contradictory arguments which both seem logical to me, related to the tree pruning and hedge trimming: You should prune/cut trees only outside the growing season, when the tree is ...
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1answer
268 views

Do plants absorb toxins from the soil?

Consider a plant like Aloe Vera that grows up in a toxic environment where the concentration of pesticides, and materials like lead, mercury, cadmium, arsenic etc is very high(e.g. Marshland dumping ...
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4answers
1k views

How do trees manage to grow equally in all directions?

I was walking down a road with these beautifully huge trees when this question occurred to me. Large trees with many thick branches have to grow equally in all directions, or they would tip over. Is ...
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13 views

Cellulase Assay [closed]

I'm doing an investigation on the effect of temperature on cellulase. I have done a cellulase assay twice and it has been a failure both times. Can anyone recommend an assay that will only take ...
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Why do plants have green leaves and not red?

I know plants are green due to chlorophyll. Surely it would be more beneficial for plants to be red than green as by being green they reflect green light and do not absorb it even though green light ...
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1answer
65 views

Evolution, What would the first plants have been like?

I am curious what the first plants are thought to have been like, what they may have evolved from, and how much earlier (or later) than animals they are thought to have moved to land, if they even ...
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0answers
28 views

Visualizing GFP in transgenic rice seeds?

I want to express GFP in rice as a method for differentiating transgenic from non transgenic rice seeds. I want to know if I can visualize them using a hand held UV lamp as the GFP I will be using has ...
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1answer
155 views

Independence of Light independent reaction in photosynthesis?

Inspired by a question asked to me by a classmate, I have the following question about Light-independent (dark phase) reactions in photosynthesis:- Let us suppose an algae sample was exposed to ...
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1answer
61 views

Shade-loving Plants

In shade-loving plants, the light compensation point is reached at low irradiance because: A. Leaves have more chlorophyll per reaction center B. These plants have greatly reduced respiration rates ...
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2answers
89 views

What is the difference between drought resistant non-succulent plants and plants that cannot be allowed to dry out?

What features make one plant able to withstand dry spells better than another with relatively similar structure? For instance, one of my Rudbeckias is wilting from drought at the moment, and an ...
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1answer
1k views

Does photosynthesis require only direct sunlight

I have learned throughout my basic science classes in high school that in the process of photosynthesis, plants absorb sunlight & produce food. They use carbon dioxide & water vapour. My ...
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How will rising carbon dioxide levels in the troposphere affect photosynthetic producers?

Much discussion has been had about the affects of climate change on plantlife, but how will rising carbon dioxide concentrations affect the photosynthetic process itself? Since CO₂ is a reagent in ...
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2answers
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Clarification on Hatch and slack pathway

The following is a minor clarification that I want to make, since it is rarely addressed directly in most of the texts I have gone through. In C₄ pathway, the chloroplasts are dimorphic, that is, ...
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2answers
263 views

Why is the floral biodiversity of grazed grassland higher than that of mown grassland?

I have collected some data to compare the biodiversity of a field in which the plagioclimax is maintained by machine mowing with a field in which the plagioclimax is maintained by sheep grazing. What ...
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2answers
103 views

Will climate change affect flower population?

There is a flower population elevated 1000 meters above sea level. If climate change causes a 12⁰C increase in temperature over the next 10 years, what will happen to the flowers?
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2answers
102 views

Why can we breathe only oxygen?

Plants has the capacity to take in both CO2 and oxygen, that's during day CO2 and at night oxygen. Why don't humans have such a capability?
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1answer
89 views

Is Hypericum Perforatum (St. John's wort) a C3 or C4 plant?

I've been curious as to which photosynthetic cycle St. John's wort uses to synthesise glucose and more complex carbohydrates. I know it probably won't be the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) cycle ...
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1answer
67 views

H₂S as a source of electrons for plants

The first electron source for plants was H2S, but now most modern plants use H2O as an electron source. What is the advantage of using H2O instead of H2S?
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Fe(II) and Fe(III) transport from rhizosphere across plasmamembrane

Does the graminaceous plants have passive uptake of Fe(II) via a passive Fe(II)-transporter enzyme? Or it it only dicots and non-graminaceous plants that have the Fe(II)-transporter enzyme? Also, can ...
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64 views

Gender and age-specific mutation rate in plants

Background General concept According to Cochran and Harpending (2013), mothers transmits on average a number $x$ of new mutations to their offspring. This number $x$ is independent of the age of the ...
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Which trees/shrubs provide most food for wildlife in northeastern US?

Let's say I have an opportunity to plant a couple trees or shrubs in my backyard that is adjacent to a small 20 acre area of woodland surrounded by urban development. There are animals like rabbits, ...
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51 views

Suggestions of famous experiments with plant cells? [closed]

I am looking for examples of famous experiments with plant cells. Ideally, the experiment would use: bright-field microscopy staining include several compared groups, so that e.g. one-factor ...
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2answers
210 views

What determines the autumn leaf color?

It is autumn out there. Green, brown, red, yellow, and mixed-colored leaves drop from the trees to the ground. What determines the colors of the leaves? Wikipedia tells me Leaf senescence is the ...
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1answer
97 views

How to distinguish those flowers in outskirts: hawkweeds (Hieracium), hawksbeard (Crepis) and hawkbits (Leontodon)?

How to distinguish those flowers of the forest outskirts: hawkweeds (Hieracium), hawksbeard (Crepis) and hawkbits (Leontodon)? I am not asking about concrete species it should be extremely hard since ...
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Receptors for red and far-red light in plants: Shade avoidance

Franklin (2009) describes how plants use the ratio of the red wavelength (660-670nm) over the far-red wavelength (725-735nm) (R:FR) in order to avoid shading. My question is: which receptor is ...
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39 views

Grow plants in relative darkness [closed]

Having a room in my apartment with no windows and therefore no direct light, I wonder if some plant species would grow happily in there. Any ideas? Some answers can be found in plants that lives in ...
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22 views

what are the best candidate trees for desert reforestation projects?

The trees would be selected for their ability to withstand rough arid condition ( use less water or finding it deep, resist to high temperature ) to produce the maximum biomass and regenerate the ...
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2answers
31 views

recolonize earth desert with plants : which plants first?

if willing to recolonize earth desert , let's say sahara or any dehydrated and sterile land, without intensive human intervention, what would be the first plants / algae / fungi /bacteria to grow ? ...
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1answer
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Among xerophyte plants, which one grow faster and consume water the least?

In an effort to select for the most suitable plants to possibly colonise desert and stop its expansion, what would be the xerophyte plants that grow the faster and expand on surface, while using the ...
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2answers
21 views

Rhizosphere vs. Endorhiza?

In microbiology and the naming of the various areas of the plant as it relates to microbial inhabitance, I am confused as to the difference between the terms endorhiza and rhizosphere. In this case I ...
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975 views

How do trees lift water higher than 10 meters?

The atmosphere pressure is 10 meters of water (approx). This means that it is impossible to lift water higher than 10 meters with vacuum or сapillary action (on Earth, under normal conditions). There ...
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0answers
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How does Pothos grow in only water?

The popular potted plant, Pothos aureus (or Epipremnum aureum) is happy to grow in a jar, with only water, for years. How is this possible when other plants need at least Nitrogen, Phosphorus and ...
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4answers
575 views

Is it possible to genetically modify a plant at home?

Would I be able to genetically modify a plant at home? What equipment will be necessary? I think it might be a fun change from the 'norm'. Are some plants easier to modify than others?
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1answer
65 views

Why can't a Corn have 13 rows of seeds?

Every time before eating a corn, I count its lines. I would always find 12 or 14 rows of seeds but never 13. Is there any biological/scientific reason behind this?
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Does a presence of ants on a plant mean that the plant has been infested by aphids?

Ants protect aphids from their predators (such as ladybirds): Aphids and other hemipteran insects secrete a sweet liquid called honeydew, when they feed on plant sap. The sugars in honeydew are a ...
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1answer
59 views

Help identify this awesome climbing plant with velcro like stem

I got this plant sprouting in my window box this spring. Starting from a single seed, it has grown into an impressive array of branching climbing vines, reaching 6 feet tall. The stem turned red as it ...
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Difference between thylakoids and lamellae in a chloroplast?

I'm slightly confused as to the difference between thylakoids and lamellae. My understanding was that thylakoids are 'discs' that are stacked into grana and there is a membrane between the grana ...
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0answers
31 views

Why Hasn't my Cactus Grown Deadly Spines?

I recently purchased a small cactus plant from my local store for about $5. I've been giving the cactus lots of sunlight and a good watering every week. I've noticed that since I bought it, the ...
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23 views

Gymnosperm Spores and Seeds

In gymnosperms, what is the difference between spores and seeds? My textbook does not explain it clearly. Are seeds released during reproduction or are the spores released during reproduction? In the ...
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44 views

What is this vinca like vine?

What is this vinca like vine? Is it poisonous? 62521 USA Illinois
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1answer
79 views

Species identification, tree from Ecuador

This tree is recently photographed in Quito, Ecuador. It grows everywhere. I'm new to South American flora, so I'd like to know what the species it is?