The study of plant life; e.g. angiosperms, gymnosperms, bryophytes, pteridophytes, and algae.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
1answer
166 views

Change of phase from juvenile to adult in plants

I tried googling this but couldn't get much information on this. Most of the articles were about induction of flowering. I am more interested in knowing what factors influence the conversion of ...
3
votes
2answers
30 views

Is the water transpired by plants pure H₂O, or does it contain trace minerals?

I'm considering the idea of drinking water that I trap from what is transpired by trees. Interestingly, is this water a fairly (or maybe even extraordinarily) pure form of H₂O, a remarkably pure ...
2
votes
0answers
19 views

What should be the distance between plant promoter and gene?

I am trying to clone a rice gene under a different endogenous rice promoter.I will be cloning the CDS of the rice gene.So I wanted to know what is the minimum or maximum distance I should put between ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

How long does it take for commercial fertilizers to break down? [closed]

Sometimes we buy carrots that are abit bitter, it's the taste of fertilzer. Once i put a tomato in the fridge, and when i ate it, it was bitter like shweppes, and i figured that was fertilizer also. ...
2
votes
1answer
29 views

Sansevieria species specification needed

What are the botanical differences between the species S. parva and S. senegambica? Please highlight the main ones. I have 2 groups of plants. One with label "Sansevieria dooneri" (a synonym of S. ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Why do pine stands exist?

I live in the midwestern United States. I cycle to work, sometimes on heavily wooded roads, and I can't help but notice that in most places within the surrounding deciduous forests Pine and evergreen ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

What is the name of this big plant with a purple trunk and green to purple berries? [duplicate]

I have photographed the following plant in our garden in Pittsburgh, PA. Do you know the name of the plant?
1
vote
0answers
63 views

Genetically modified Klebsiella Planticola nearly bulldozers plant life as we know it?

The article "The Bacterium That (Almost) Ate the World" by Elaine Ingham (see also here or here) describes a genetically modified bacterium that would break down cellulose plant matter into alcohol: ...
3
votes
3answers
398 views

What kind of tree could this be?

This may be a strange question, but does anyone know what kind of tree this could be? I know, it's just a comic, but these trees, at “walking distance” within that comic are easily identifiable as ...
2
votes
1answer
133 views

How do some plants grow in salt water, while others die?

My question is basically out of curiosity and comes from observing how certain plants (such as mangroves or salt cedar) can grow in seawater. If this gives the plant an advantage, why haven't all ...
2
votes
2answers
382 views

Is dried grain dead or dormant?

Is dried grain considered dead or dormant botanically? Related to a BH-SE question.
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Leaves not liked by herbivores

I at times have many goats grazing in our locality. Recently a few cows were seen too. I just offered one of the cows a few leaves from Jasminum sambac plant growing in our garden. The cow smelled and ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

is it necessary that every theca of an angiospermic anther must contain two microsporangia

i basically don't know the procedure or sequence of steps involved in the formation of anthers but i have read it somewhere it is formed from the dedifferentiation of shoot apical meristem of the ...
5
votes
1answer
42 views

What is the name of this plant with many purple blooms with orange inner parts?

I have photographed the following plant in Pittsburgh, PA. It has many blooms and every bloom is very small (about 5mm diameter), purple on the outer and orange in the inner. You can see it here: ...
1
vote
0answers
10 views

Potential evapotranspiration constant for trees in the area of London

I am trying to find the ET0 (Potential evapotranspiration) under the climate conditions of London (UK) and Coimbra (Portugal) for each month. From what I understand these data is available in the ...
59
votes
5answers
1k views

Is there a reason why human eyesight and plants make use of the same wavelength of light?

The accepted range for the wavelengths of light that the human eye can detect is roughly between 400nm and 700nm. Is it a co-incidence that these wavelengths are identical to those in the ...
3
votes
2answers
80 views

Convergent evolution of fruits

Many fruits are not homologous, originating from different parts of a plant. Yet they all have similar properties: Ripe fruits all have yellow to dark red color They all have a lot of water and ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

Is this pCAMBIA co-transformation possible?

I would like to know whether the pCAMBIA1200 and pCAMBIA0380 be used for co-transformation of rice using Agrobacterium LBA4404.They probably have the same ori site so they belong to the same ...
3
votes
1answer
105 views

What is the name of this plant?

This plant was found growing in Germany. I have never seen it before, reverse Google image search did not help either. Can you help me identify what type of plant this is? Thanks, looks like it ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Why doesn't the herbicide 2,4-D damage lawn grass?

I sometimes use 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid to control broadleaved weeds in lawns. It is selective, and quickly kills the dicot weeds, while other plants are unharmed. 2,4-D is a synthetic auxin, ...
3
votes
1answer
32 views

How can a plant resist glyphosate (Roundup) herbicide?

In my area, the most common weeds that strongly resists (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) (glyphosate) are the horseweed, or mare's tail, Conyza canadensis, and Canada thistle, Cirsium arvense There are ...
1
vote
0answers
18 views

Why doesn't Fenoxaprop-P-ethyl damage cool season lawns?

For controlling bermudagrass, Cynodon dactylon, a serious perennial grassy lawn weed in my area, I use the herbicide Fenoxaprop-P-ethyl. It kills the bermudagrass rather well, without damaging the ...
2
votes
0answers
29 views

How does Halosulfuron-methyl kill nutsedge, while leaving lawn grass and most weeds undamaged?

I use Halosulfuron-methyl to control yellow and purple nutsedge in lawns. This chemical acts by interfering with the acetolactate synthase enzyme, which quickly slows cell division, and growth at all ...
4
votes
0answers
27 views

How does MSMA kill crabgrass with only minimal damage to lawn grasses?

I use MSMA (Monosodium methyl arsenate) to kill crabgrass in lawns. I am not certain of the mode of action. How does this chemical work? How does it target the annual grassy weeds, without damaging ...
4
votes
0answers
24 views

Why doesn't Clopyralid damage cool season lawn grasses?

I use Clopyralid (3,6-dichloro-2-pyridinecarboxilic acid) to kill broad leaved weeds in lawns. From my understanding, it works by mimicking an auxin which affects plant growth. Naturally this pulls ...
1
vote
2answers
81 views

Significance of synthesis of D-glucose in plants..?

why plants can only synthesize D-glucose why not L-glucose along with D glucose. I know it very well that plants have only enzymes which can synthesize D-glucose but Why not they have enzymes which ...
2
votes
0answers
21 views

Why are watermelons sweeter in the center?

Today I had a slice of watermelon and when I reached the outer parts of the pulp I wondered why those are less sweet. Whether or not the sugar occurs in crystalline form in watermelons is still an ...
8
votes
1answer
606 views

If the xylem of a woody plant is composed of dead tissue, how does sapwood become heartwood?

If the xylem of a tree is composed entirely of dead tissue, then that means the sapwood is dead. If so, how does it transform into heartwood, and what starts the process?
3
votes
1answer
115 views

Are there any air-plants with parts that are edible for humans?

Are any air plants (Tillansia sp.) safe for humans to eat? I haven't been able to find whether or not there are. Pineapple is in the same family (Bromeliaceae), but isn't an air plant.
12
votes
3answers
175 views

Why do some fruits have a much wider range of acceptable sizes than others?

Some fruits such as pumpkins can grow to be 100 lbs. Under different conditions, the same variety of pumpkin can produce a 15 lb. fruit. Both plants are healthy, and look the same except for their ...
8
votes
1answer
153 views

How did these apples grow together?

I came through this pic while scrolling through facebook, and it was a bit strange to me. As far as I know apples have a corymbose type of inflorescence, in which a single pedicel ends in a single ...
2
votes
1answer
174 views

what is the difference between early blight of potato and late blight of potato?

apart from different fungus causing these diseases in potato, how are Early Blight of potato and Late blight of potato different?
2
votes
1answer
249 views

How is this yellow bumblebee called that I photographed in New York City?

Does anybody know the name of this bumblebee? (For categorization on wikipedia commons)
3
votes
1answer
522 views

What is the name of this flower with purple leaves and orange inner part in NYC?

I've photographed this flower a few days ago in New York City: Does anybody know the name of it? (and how is the orange part called?)
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Is it dangerous to eat a mutated eggplant descended from a radioactive ancestor?

What is the risk, if any, associated with eating a 100th-generation mutated eggplant derived from a radioactive ancestor? In another word, is that possible that organic toxin will be produced by the ...
3
votes
1answer
71 views

why are neutral [sterile] female flowers present in inflorescences when they are reproductively incompatible

in many compound and special inflorescences like spadix and hypanthodium there are sterile female flowers along with male and female fertile flowers and are often present in between male and female ...
15
votes
3answers
462 views

Why do some trees have a life span, while some don't?

I have heard that there is no limit on the growth of trees, but then why do some trees, such as boxelders and poplars, tend to live shorter than redwoods, for example? Some advertisements for improved ...
2
votes
1answer
90 views

How can I determine the gender of a tree seedling?

I would like to plant some home grown female mulberry trees in a circle, with a male plant in the center for pollination. How do I determine the gender of a tree seedling? I know it's possible, ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

What is the name of this type of inflorescence?

I was having a look at a rhizophora plant (from the mangrove family), and I got curious about its inflorescence. I can't make out what kind of inflorescence it is. Here is a photo of the ...
3
votes
1answer
72 views

How does boiling water revive cut flowers?

A classic tip to revive wilted cut flowers is to plunge the stem into boiling water for some period of time, and then back into cold water. What process is occurring that causes the flower to be ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Does Yerba Mate contain Beta carbolines like harman and norharman?

I know that this is true of (roasted) coffee but haven't been able to find any reliable information about mate in its smoked or steamed state. Thank you.
3
votes
2answers
98 views

Where do trees get their shape?

Does anyone know any good resources dealing with shapes of trees? For example, pine trees are cone shaped for optimal absorption of sunlight, but lone pine trees growing in isolation (and other ...
5
votes
3answers
146 views

Why are there no tree-like plants that grow in lakes?

Looking at aerial photos of boreal forests, with dense woods clear-cut by quiet lakes, I wondered why exactly are the woods so clear-cut at the edge of water? Why won't trees develop adaptations that ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

Confusion regarding seedless grape and the normal process of germination

In general, does seedless grape by definition contains seed or is the seed small enough that the process of ingestion creates the illusion that there is no seed? If the latter is true, is the ...
2
votes
2answers
88 views

What is doubling of genetic material invented in flowering plants?

David Attenborough in his Kingdom of Plants 3D said, that flowering plants made two inventions: (1) doubling of genetic material and (2) symbiosis with animals. What was meant by "doubling of genetic ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

identification of species of tree

I just want to confirm the species of the tree in the middle of the picture. Is it the "Flame of the Forest"? This is taken in my school campus. Thanks in advance!
18
votes
1answer
518 views

Do trees age on a microscopic level?

Most animals age via at least two mechinisms: at a "macroscopic" level, basically wear and tear to the point where (on evolutionary time scales) it's more genetically advantageous to optimize for ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

Silene virginica Endangered in FL

Why is Silene virginica, colloquially known as Fire Pink, endangered in Florida? What factors besides human industrialization are affecting its survival there?
8
votes
3answers
3k views

What's the worst that can happen from eating too many spicy peppers? Can you die?

Some peppers, such as the habanero or Carolina reaper are extremely spicy, and when eaten in larger amounts than one is accustomed to, can cause some discomfort. I've also heard anecdotes claiming ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

What evolutionary adaptations cause trees to grow tall?

I think there are some obvious costs for trees to grow tall. Carbon and other nutrients costs, maintenance cost, energy cost (for growing, to bring water (and nutrients) up to the higher leaves, ...