The study of plant life; e.g. angiosperms, gymnosperms, bryophytes, pteridophytes, and algae.

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Molds and fungi usually found on book pages: identifying and preventing further spread

I know I can use bleach to kill most of the spores that live on my walls. I know I have to keep humidity below a certain level and temperature above another to prevent the spread of mold. I have read ...
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14 views

Why do Sorghum Bicolor leaves roll up?

In A level Bio today we talked about abcesic acid as a stress hormone, and its ability to reduce osmotic potential around guard cells to close stomata. My question is, is abscesic acid in sorghum ...
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0answers
29 views

Among xerophyte plants, which one grow faster and consume water the least? [closed]

In an effort to select for the most suitable plants to possibly colonise desert and stop its expansion, what would be the xerophyte plants that grow the faster and expand on surface, while using the ...
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1answer
48 views

Ants eating bark [closed]

Was out walking in the park today, came across a tree, and me being me I thought "Hey lets try climbing this thing for fun." But something strange struck me, the tree was completely devoid, as in ...
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3answers
192 views

Why are there no tree-like plants that grow in lakes?

Looking at aerial photos of boreal forests, with dense woods clear-cut by quiet lakes, I wondered why exactly are the woods so clear-cut at the edge of water? Why won't trees develop adaptations that ...
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1answer
30 views

Pollinator mating system in orchids

I came across three terms in an article on pseudocopulation. However I don't quite understand what it means. They are: 1) solitary and haplodiploid 2) social and haplodiploid 3) diploid These ...
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33 views

Rosemary room temperature at winter

I consistently read in non-scientific resources that I have to put my rosemary to low temperature (about 10°C) in winter (unless I don't want it to freeze). I googled, but I fail to find a scientific ...
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1answer
130 views

Difference between thylakoids and lamellae in a chloroplast?

I'm slightly confused as to the difference between thylakoids and lamellae. My understanding was that thylakoids are 'discs' that are stacked into grana and there is a membrane between the grana ...
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5answers
881 views

Is it possible to genetically modify a plant at home?

Would I be able to genetically modify a plant at home? What equipment will be necessary? I think it might be a fun change from the 'norm' of regular hybridisation, to try some inter-family gene ...
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1answer
1k views

Ripening bananas artificially: What is the biological reason

I am a resident of the tropical island of Sri Lanka, and we have a strange traditional method to ripen our bananas quickly. What we do is this: We dig a pit in earth that is enough to put the whole ...
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2answers
344 views

Why was it so hard to decode the corn genome?

My teachers growing up told me it was impossible to decode the maize genome. But yet its been done. Why was decoding the genome so significant, and what made it so difficult?
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37 views

Why vivipary is not found in all mangrove plants?

An interesting characteristic feature of mangrove plants is vivipary or viviparous germination...but some notable members of the family like Heritiera sp.( there is even a mangrove forest named after ...
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29 views

Endemic plant families on islands?

Endemism on islands is quite a common phenomenon, at least at the level of species or genera. Old continental fragments like Madagascar or New Caledonia may even harbour endemic families which went ...
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3answers
223 views

Where does crop biomass come from?

Each year, large volumes of crop are harvested from fields. Where does this biomass get replenished from?
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1answer
38 views

Why are the genomes of some trees so large?

For example, the current longest known genome belongs to a tree: http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-largest-genome-ever-sequenced-belongs-to-a-tree I have heard that this could potentially be ...
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1answer
24 views

Does the tannin level in plants go down or up after they die? Or does the tannin level stay the same regardless?

Does the tannin level in plants go down or up after they die? Or does the tannin level stay the same regardless? As they decay, do they release more tannins or does the production stop?
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0answers
12 views

what is the role of ctab in plant dna extraction [duplicate]

i get good results for dna extraction by using ctab method but i doesn't have that proper information for role/function of ctab and other chemical. Anyone know, please briefly explain ......
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0answers
40 views

Is it possible to simulate the effects of high altitudes for plants?

Note- I considered asking this on gardening.stackexchange.com but i believe it is better suited for this site since it deals with more complicated material. As I understand it, certain plants ...
2
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1answer
55 views

The biology behind tree pruning and hedge trimming

I read two contradictory arguments which both seem logical to me, related to the tree pruning and hedge trimming: You should prune/cut trees only outside the growing season, when the tree is ...
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1answer
59 views

What does the root “phyllum” mean used botanical binomial nomenclature

I often encounter the root "phyllum" in bionomial names in botany, but I've had trouble finding an actual definition for this root in any Latin dictionary outside of its taxonomic meaning. From ...
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2answers
66 views

What kind of technology is required for plant seed DNA printing? [closed]

I'm a programmer so I have little knowledge in the field of biology. However I have an interest in plants, GMOs and DNA (in terms of programming). So, I want to know what kind of technology is ...
5
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1answer
62 views

What is the name of this plant with many purple blooms with orange inner parts?

I have photographed the following plant in Pittsburgh, PA. It has many blooms and every bloom is very small (about 5mm diameter), purple on the outer and orange in the inner. You can see it here: ...
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2answers
1k views

Does cooking or ripening reduce the concentration of solanine in nightshade?

I recall a story from one of my Botany professors where he encountered a woman picking Solanum dulcamara (nightshade) berries. When he asked her what she was doing with them, she responded that her ...
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1answer
34 views

Somatic Mutations in meristem tissue in plants

In angiosperm, in which layer of the meristem does a new mitotic mutation occurring has chance to be found in a pollen grain or in an ovule? I also welcome some insights about non-angiosperm plants.
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1answer
308 views

Do plants absorb toxins from the soil?

Consider a plant like Aloe Vera that grows up in a toxic environment where the concentration of pesticides, and materials like lead, mercury, cadmium, arsenic etc is very high(e.g. Marshland dumping ...
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4answers
4k views

Why do plants have green leaves and not red?

I know plants are green due to chlorophyll. Surely it would be more beneficial for plants to be red than green as by being green they reflect green light and do not absorb it even though green light ...
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1answer
74 views

Evolution, What would the first plants have been like?

I am curious what the first plants are thought to have been like, what they may have evolved from, and how much earlier (or later) than animals they are thought to have moved to land, if they even ...
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42 views

Visualizing GFP in transgenic rice seeds?

I want to express GFP in rice as a method for differentiating transgenic from non transgenic rice seeds. I want to know if I can visualize them using a hand held UV lamp as the GFP I will be using has ...
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1answer
227 views

Independence of Light independent reaction in photosynthesis?

Inspired by a question asked to me by a classmate, I have the following question about Light-independent (dark phase) reactions in photosynthesis:- Let us suppose an algae sample was exposed to ...
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1answer
62 views

Shade-loving Plants

In shade-loving plants, the light compensation point is reached at low irradiance because: A. Leaves have more chlorophyll per reaction center B. These plants have greatly reduced respiration rates ...
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2answers
159 views

What is the difference between drought resistant non-succulent plants and plants that cannot be allowed to dry out?

What features make one plant able to withstand dry spells better than another with relatively similar structure? For instance, one of my Rudbeckias is wilting from drought at the moment, and an ...
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2answers
4k views

How will rising carbon dioxide levels in the troposphere affect photosynthetic producers?

Much discussion has been had about the affects of climate change on plantlife, but how will rising carbon dioxide concentrations affect the photosynthetic process itself? Since CO₂ is a reagent in ...
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2answers
56 views

Clarification on Hatch and slack pathway

The following is a minor clarification that I want to make, since it is rarely addressed directly in most of the texts I have gone through. In C₄ pathway, the chloroplasts are dimorphic, that is, ...
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272 views

Why is the floral biodiversity of grazed grassland higher than that of mown grassland?

I have collected some data to compare the biodiversity of a field in which the plagioclimax is maintained by machine mowing with a field in which the plagioclimax is maintained by sheep grazing. What ...
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2answers
105 views

Will climate change affect flower population?

There is a flower population elevated 1000 meters above sea level. If climate change causes a 12⁰C increase in temperature over the next 10 years, what will happen to the flowers?
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128 views

Why can we breathe only oxygen?

Plants has the capacity to take in both CO2 and oxygen, that's during day CO2 and at night oxygen. Why don't humans have such a capability?
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1answer
101 views

Is Hypericum Perforatum (St. John's wort) a C3 or C4 plant?

I've been curious as to which photosynthetic cycle St. John's wort uses to synthesise glucose and more complex carbohydrates. I know it probably won't be the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) cycle ...
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1answer
76 views

H₂S as a source of electrons for plants

The first electron source for plants was H2S, but now most modern plants use H2O as an electron source. What is the advantage of using H2O instead of H2S?
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2answers
246 views

What determines the autumn leaf color?

It is autumn out there. Green, brown, red, yellow, and mixed-colored leaves drop from the trees to the ground. What determines the colors of the leaves? Wikipedia tells me Leaf senescence is the ...
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1answer
120 views

How to distinguish those flowers in outskirts: hawkweeds (Hieracium), hawksbeard (Crepis) and hawkbits (Leontodon)?

How to distinguish those flowers of the forest outskirts: hawkweeds (Hieracium), hawksbeard (Crepis) and hawkbits (Leontodon)? I am not asking about concrete species it should be extremely hard since ...
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2answers
34 views

recolonize earth desert with plants : which plants first?

if willing to recolonize earth desert , let's say sahara or any dehydrated and sterile land, without intensive human intervention, what would be the first plants / algae / fungi /bacteria to grow ? ...
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44 views

Rhizosphere vs. Endorhiza?

In microbiology and the naming of the various areas of the plant as it relates to microbial inhabitance, I am confused as to the difference between the terms endorhiza and rhizosphere. In this case I ...
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4answers
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How do trees lift water higher than 10 meters?

The atmosphere pressure is 10 meters of water (approx). This means that it is impossible to lift water higher than 10 meters with vacuum or сapillary action (on Earth, under normal conditions). There ...
4
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0answers
43 views

How does Pothos grow in only water?

The popular potted plant, Pothos aureus (or Epipremnum aureum) is happy to grow in a jar, with only water, for years. How is this possible when other plants need at least Nitrogen, Phosphorus and ...
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1answer
84 views

Why can't a Corn have 13 rows of seeds?

Every time before eating a corn, I count its lines. I would always find 12 or 14 rows of seeds but never 13. Is there any biological/scientific reason behind this?
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1answer
82 views

Help identify this awesome climbing plant with velcro like stem

I got this plant sprouting in my window box this spring. Starting from a single seed, it has grown into an impressive array of branching climbing vines, reaching 6 feet tall. The stem turned red as it ...
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0answers
53 views

Why Hasn't my Cactus Grown Deadly Spines? [on hold]

I recently purchased a small cactus plant from my local store for about $5. I've been giving the cactus lots of sunlight and a good watering every week. I've noticed that since I bought it, the ...
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1answer
86 views

Species identification, tree from Ecuador

This tree is recently photographed in Quito, Ecuador. It grows everywhere. I'm new to South American flora, so I'd like to know what the species it is?
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1answer
191 views

Change of phase from juvenile to adult in plants

I tried googling this but couldn't get much information on this. Most of the articles were about induction of flowering. I am more interested in knowing what factors influence the conversion of ...
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2answers
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Is the water transpired by plants pure H₂O, or does it contain trace minerals?

I'm considering the idea of drinking water that I trap from what is transpired by trees. Interestingly, is this water a fairly (or maybe even extraordinarily) pure form of H₂O, a remarkably pure ...