The study of plant life; e.g. angiosperms, gymnosperms, bryophytes, pteridophytes, and algae.

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21 views

Can humans extract calories from all roots? [closed]

Roots are used for storing plants' energy, which suggests that humans could extract the calories by consuming them. However, I have been unable to find any substantial sources on consuming the roots ...
4
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0answers
20 views

Why do shed and brown poplar (Populus) leaves get an iridescent blueish colour when wet?

When the brown leaves of poplars shed on the ground stay for a while under wet conditions (e.g. like in a puddle), they become a fascinating iridescent blueish colour, which is best seen when light ...
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1answer
48 views

Creation of healthy genetically modified crops [closed]

GM crops are huge at the moment, and the noticeable 'counter movement' is for people to continue to purchase organic foods (please note I am specifically talking of GM crops and not meats, etc). The ...
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1answer
276 views

Is chlorophyll living or non living?

Is chlorophyll living or non living, and after boiling the water out of a chlorophyll extract would it still live, as in would it still maintain its properties after re-adding liquid to the dried ...
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1answer
93 views

What is the purpose of THC for a Cannabis plant?

Why does a Cannabis plant produce THC? This question is brought up drawing an analogy to nicotine in tobacco, where nicotine is developed by tobacco plants as a pesticide. Is THC a pesticide as well? ...
3
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1answer
60 views

Possible calculations with temperature, humidity, images and VIS spectrum of a plant in an Integrating sphere

I am currently working on a project which involves growing some plants in a integrating sphere made of foam. I have added temperature, humidity and soil moisture sensors as well as a Spectrometer (350 ...
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3answers
531 views

Doubly-compound leaf examples?

I've got a project where we collect leaves, classify them, etc. There are some required classifications. One of the requirements is to get a doubly-compound leaf. What are some trees that are doubly-...
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1answer
822 views

What is the difference between taxonomical aids Flora, Manual and Catalogue?

The three type of books mentioned above are taxonomical aids that offer information about species found in an area. However, the exact difference between them is not clear to me. Please explain.
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2answers
1k views

Are these birch or aspen trees?

I was just wondering if anybody could help me identify the trees in this image? I am confused as to whether they are aspen or birch, a mix of the two, or whether the brown/reddish trees are some other ...
3
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2answers
55 views

Are chilies technically peppers?

Nando's chain of restaurants (UK) refers to chili peppers as just "chilies". My friend and I had a discussion with regard to whether chilies can be called "peppers" or if they do not belong to the ...
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0answers
22 views

How does the snail shells' fertilizer compare to regular fertilizers?

May I ask about the quality of the fertilizer derived from the shells and their effectiveness compared to other fertilizers on the market ?
4
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2answers
98 views

What plant is this?

It was all along a fence in a downtown core in Ottawa, flowering in November. I didn't get a better close-up of the flower itself, I had thought the leaves would be pretty important.
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0answers
22 views

Relation b/w venation and transpiration

What purpose does reticulate venation in dorsiventral leaf or parallel venation in isobilateral leaf serve? Does it have any relation with unequal transpiration in dorsiventral leaf or equal ...
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2answers
689 views

Why are there so many medicinal plants?

Question Quite a few plant species can be used for medicinal purposes wiki. As an example, Filipendula ulmaria is rich in acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin). An allele that produces a substance which is ...
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0answers
28 views

What are the evolutionary benefits for herbs having beneficial health effects on humans? [duplicate]

There are many types of plants which produce chemicals which can be beneficial in treating human illnesses, or at least alleviate painful symptoms. Why would they do that? Is it just random chance, ...
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0answers
40 views

What is this plant/tree? [closed]

I'm trying to identify a plant or tree.Small round Orange to yellow petals with a protruding red stamin. Found in the Florida keys. Sub tropic.
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1answer
100 views

Is Asteraceae and Compositae the same family?

I'm wondering what taxonomic family sunflowers (Helianthus) belong to. Although it's mentioned it belongs to family Asteraceae it is also a composite flower. So it belongs to Asteraceae or Compositae ...
4
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1answer
93 views

Why it seems that principles of chemistry are not being applied in this biochemical process? [closed]

According to an answer in this question, my concept used below does not apply: In the non-cyclic photophosphorylation, consider splitting of two water molecules, then 4 e- (electrons) and 4 H+ (...
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0answers
19 views

Are there water conservation methods that increase waste instead of reduce it? [closed]

For example, does improperly washing clothes lead to mosquito increases or other-organism morbidity? Does using dish water on the garden attribute to clean water more or more wasted water (is it ...
6
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1answer
5k views

How does a pine cone open?

When a pine cone is wet, it remains closed. However, when it's dry it opens again. From the perspective of physics or biomechanics, what is the mechanism that allows a pine cone to open and close as ...
7
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2answers
290 views

How many ATP are formed?

What is the number of ATP molecules formed during the photosynthetic processes which consume 8 molecules of $\text{H}_2\text{O}$ due to noncyclic electron transport and subsequent photophosphorylation?...
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0answers
24 views

Database/Reference on optimal conditions for plant growth in greenhouses [closed]

We are a group of computer science students currently working on a university project to create a (almost) self-sufficient greenhouse. The hardware and software aspects being almost finished, we ...
2
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1answer
18 views

Anemiaceae etymology

What is the etymology of the name Anemiaceae for a family of ferns? I assume that it's from the name Anemia for one of its genera, but that is equally mysterious. Obviously it has no blood, but what ...
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0answers
19 views

In what sense does lichen 'eat around itself'?

Source: pp 31-32, Lichen Secondary Metabolites: Bioactive Properties and Pharmaceutical Potential, edited by Branislav Ranković Lichens are used for many different medicinal purposes, but there ...
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0answers
49 views

Does the bending of a tree's trunk in the wind stimulate and strengthen root growth?

Recently Southern California experienced extreme wind velocities and afterwards the news reported over 300 trees had fallen in San Diego County. I had either heard or read somewhere that the action of ...
3
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2answers
97 views

Why do pine stands exist?

I live in the midwestern United States. I cycle to work, sometimes on heavily wooded roads, and I can't help but notice that in most places within the surrounding deciduous forests Pine and evergreen ...
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4answers
8k views

Do plants with non-green leaves have chlorophyll and photosynthesis?

Is it even possible that plants with non-green leaves have chlorophyll, and do such non-green leaved plants carry out photosynthesis?
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2answers
86 views

Etymology of the term monilophyte

I would like to know the origin of the term Monilophyta. I know it's from Kenrick and Crane, but where did they get monilo-? It's not in my enormous Liddell and Scott Greek dictionary, nor is there ...
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0answers
31 views

Is there a special reason why ferns are so early in evolution?

Reading about plants in history it seems that ferns where already in the Devonian period (400 million years ago) growing. Probably the climate in that time was very different from now, but what made ...
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0answers
23 views

How to stimulate Mimosa pudica at its roots?

The sensitive plant Mimosa pudica is a remarkable little plant whose characteristic feature is its ability to droop its leaves when stimulated: For a new studies project, could anyone think of a ...
4
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2answers
263 views

What is Growing on These Tree Leaves? (Image)

I found a seemingly diseased tree when I was out playing tennis yesterday... What is growing on this tree leaf? Is this a disease? If so, is it contagious? I have zero knowledge in botany, but I'm ...
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0answers
147 views

How do CAM plants keep stomata closed by day and open at night?

I understand how plants open stomata, with the H+ ion removal and the resulting K+ ion influx in the guard cells to induce turgor (wikipedia article here), though not how this process relates to ...
3
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1answer
232 views

Nicotine levels in non fruit/edible parts of plants (that are not tobacco)

I am an ex smoker who now vapes (uses e-cigs). Various authorities are equating vaping with smoking by calling it a 'tobacco product' - which is in a sense true given that the majority of nicotine ...
3
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2answers
262 views

Indian tropical fruit trees and fruit bearing

Most Indian tropical fruit trees produce fruits in April-May. The best possible explanation for this is optimum water availability for fruit production. the heat allows quicker ripening of ...
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1answer
90 views

What is vascular cambium?

I'm confused over the two terms vascular cambium and intrafascicular cambium. Is vascular cambium same as intrafascicular cambium?
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0answers
33 views

What are other creatures or plants that leave “recommendations” as ants? [closed]

I'm working on a Semantic Recommendation Systems. In the state-of-the-art, I state the fact that even animals, such as ants, using some kind of recommendations by leaving markers, which are chemical ...
3
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1answer
56 views

Why does the open tree of life have 2600 species of rose?

The open tree of life has 2754 species and subspecies with the prefix Rosa. Wiki says: There is significant disagreement over the number of true rose species. Some species are so similar that ...
35
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1answer
3k views

What is it that creates that wonderful smell after a fresh rain?

I've heard that the wonderful smell of a fresh rain is actually chemicals released from the trees and grass and other plants. What is the process that allows these chemicals to be released? What ...
6
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1answer
73 views

Is there a model perennial plant species?

Most of plant science is conducted on small annual species with short life cycles; predominantly Arabidopsis thaliana, but also a handful of others like Oryza sativa and Medicago truncatula etc. Is ...
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0answers
295 views

Is it possible to simulate the effects of high altitudes for plants?

Note- I considered asking this on gardening.stackexchange.com but i believe it is better suited for this site since it deals with more complicated material. As I understand it, certain plants (...
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1answer
3k views

How do lilies sense day and night and open and close their flowers?

We have lots of lily flowers inside our garden. Their flowers are open in day and closed in night. How do lilies sense day and night and open and close their flowers?
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1answer
71 views

Determine which seed will germinate first

I recently studied about plant physiology for a test. Strangely, there was this question which I had no idea how to approach. The question is, Which seed will germinate first? a) Castor b) Wheat c)...
2
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1answer
165 views

Photoperiodism: Short-Day Plants

My Campbell's Biology textbook discusses photoperiodism of plants and introduces us to short-day and long-day plants. What I don't understand is why short day plants will not flower if they are ...
12
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1answer
3k views

Why can't a corn cob have 13 rows of seeds?

Every time before eating a corn, I count its lines. I would always find 12 or 14 rows of seeds, but never 13. Is there any biological/scientific reason behind this?
3
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1answer
109 views

Why is photosynthesis so complex?

Actually, what is the need of such long procedure? As much as I have understood, the sole purpose of photosynthesis is to synthesize carbohydrates, which is only used for energy storage. So, why don't ...
2
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1answer
130 views

Why would the citrulline content of the watermelon be so high?

Citrulline is a non-proteinogenic amino acid (that is, citrulline is an amino acid that is not coded for in mRNA), and it is an important metabolic intermediate in the Urea Cycle. The Urea Cycle is ...
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1answer
63 views

What are allogametes? please explain [closed]

Allo means different or unrelated I guess.Please clear me the meaning with some examples.
3
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1answer
66 views

What are the hairs/spikes on the edges of these leaves for?

Windows 7 has a wallpaper/background which shows an attractive, leafy plant with fine hairs or spikes on the edges. What might these be for, and what sort of plant is it? My initial (uneducated) ...
3
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0answers
62 views

What is the advantage of using plant-derived antibacterials rather than bacteria-derived antibacterials?

So obviously we have a big problem with antibiotic resistance. Most of our antibiotics originate from bacteria themselves (or are synthetic variations on scaffolds which originate from bacteria). I ...
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0answers
20 views

Machine-readable APG III trees?

Does anyone know where I can find a machine-readable version of the phylogenetic trees from APG III? I'm looking for something that contains the full tree structure, including unnamed branches. (i.e....