The study of plant life; e.g. angiosperms, gymnosperms, bryophytes, pteridophytes, and algae.

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82 views

What are these stars in my microscopic image?

I see this very curious patterns on the sun-facing side of a jasmine (probably) leaf - visible with a makeshift microscope (about 50x) What are them? Pores? Are there other plants with similar ...
3
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1answer
157 views

Has synthetic biology created new plants or animals as of 2013?

I've seen a Ted.com talk where the speaker suggests that modern science can create new micro organisms, like bacteria with a pre- defined new set of traits. But has anyone create a new species of ...
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794 views

Does photosynthesis require only direct sunlight

I have learned throughout my basic science classes in high school that in the process of photosynthesis, plants absorb sunlight & produce food. They use carbon dioxide & water vapour. My ...
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102 views

Why seeds won't sprout given excess water?

What would cause a seed to not sprout despite showing signs of germination given excess water? Oxygen, temperature, and light were sufficient for germination and sprouting in seeds of a slightly ...
3
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1answer
23 views

Mutation in axillary buds of trees overcoming self-incompatability?

I seem to recall from either reading or lecture that there have been instances of trees that are self-incompatible accumulating enough mutations in an axillary bud that the resulting branch was able ...
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1answer
43 views

Confusion regarding seedless grape and the normal process of germination

In general, does seedless grape by definition contains seed or is the seed small enough that the process of ingestion creates the illusion that there is no seed? If the latter is true, is the ...
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2answers
51 views

Why do humans circulate monosaccharides instead of disaccharides as in plants?

Plants transport food mostly in the form of disaccharides like sucrose but humans transport them in the form of a monosaccharide - glucose. What is the reason behind this ?
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57 views

H2S as a source of electrons for plants

The first electron source for plants was H2S, but now most modern plants use H2O as an electron source. What is the advantage of using H2O instead of H2S?
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66 views

What happens if we continuously stimulate a mimosa plant?

I know there is some mechanism in humans by which we start to ignore a certain stimuli if it persists for a long time (e.g., we don't feel our shoes all the time !). Can the same thing happen in ...
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18 views

Does a presence of ants on a plant mean that the plant has been infested by aphids?

Ants protect aphids from their predators (such as ladybirds): Aphids and other hemipteran insects secrete a sweet liquid called honeydew, when they feed on plant sap. The sugars in honeydew are a ...
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107 views

How does a plant decide when to grow a branch? [duplicate]

As a plant grows, at some point the first branch forms. As it continues, branches grow new branches, and so on, in a seemingly random way. Is it random, or is it driven by the environment (heat or ...
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62 views

Are mature trees as susceptible to mutation from exposure to radiation as seedlings?

If a plant, say a ficus or a teak, as a sapling were exposed to radiation, and a tree of the same species were present at the same distance, which of the two would be more likely to mutate?
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3k views

How do trees use Adhesion and Cohesion to move water against gravity?

I have an AP Bio class where I have to name 3 properties of water and I chose adhesion and cohesion for one of them. I'm having trouble finding out how exactly trees use adhesion and cohesion to move ...
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2answers
178 views

Why are there so many medicinal plants?

Here is wikipedia page containing a list of plants used in herbal medicine. One might first want to argue that many of them actually do not have any medicinal/beneficial effect on heatlth. I think we ...
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2answers
152 views

Filamentous algae - what exactly am I looking at?

I have just taken some images with my light microscope at 400x of (what I think is) some form of filamentous algae from a local pond. Now, I think I am looking at a single cell (centre) with some ...
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2answers
72 views

What is doubling of genetic material invented in flowering plants?

David Attenborough in his Kingdom of Plants 3D said, that flowering plants made two inventions: (1) doubling of genetic material and (2) symbiosis with animals. What was meant by "doubling of genetic ...
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1answer
46 views

Plant's phylogeny tree to identify which of them are closer (genetically) with another plant

I'am trying to create a phylogeny tree from some plants, as the post's title says, to help me conclude which of those plants are closer genetically with another one plant. So let's say that this is ...
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2answers
149 views

Why doesn't human consumption of plants cause infectious diseases the way consumption of animals can?

At first I want to clarify that I do know that there are naturally poisonous plants and plants that can hold radioactive stuff or toxic material from the environment. What I mean by "diseases" (I ...
2
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2answers
166 views

A source for leaf architecture of different plant species/genus?

I'm currently working on extracting some features of the leaf architecture based on their images (like L:W ratio, laminar shape, ...). I use the Manual of Leaf Architecture as the reference. It is ...
2
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1answer
100 views

What kind of mushroom(?) is this?

I found groups of these growing in the Lassen National Forest (Susanville, CA, USA). It looks like some sort of mushroom. I have Googled extensively, but can't seem to find a match.
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1answer
125 views

List of species recently found of economic value

Is there a website or organization cataloging lists of biological species to have been recently found of great economic value? For example, a plant that wasn't of economic relevance a while ago but ...
2
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1answer
33 views

How can I determine the gender of a tree seedling?

I would like to plant some home grown female mulberry trees in a circle, with a male plant in the center for pollination. How do I determine the gender of a tree seedling? I know it's possible, ...
2
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1answer
436 views

Why does freshly cut grass smell like a watermelon?

I found that, when I smell watermelon aroma outdoors, someone nearby has mowed the grass. Is there an underlying basis?
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1answer
237 views

How is this yellow bumblebee called that I photographed in New York City?

Does anybody know the name of this bumblebee? (For categorization on wikipedia commons)
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1answer
64 views

How many plants are needed to survive in an airtight chamber?

How large a garden do you need if you are to survive on them producing enough oxygen in a closed chamber? And which are the most effective plants?
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3answers
710 views

What evolutionary adaptations cause trees to grow tall?

I think there are some obvious costs for trees to grow tall. Carbon and other nutrients costs, maintenance cost, energy cost (for growing, to bring water (and nutrients) up to the higher leaves, ...
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1answer
58 views

Aside from cockroaches and other insects, which species (of all kinds) are 'immune' to ionizing radiation?

I have just been reading this excellent question and answer about cockroaches ability to withstand ionizing radiation. My question is an extension of that question: aside from insects, which other ...
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1answer
36 views

How are oranges in the US or anywhere made seedless?

How are oranges in the US or anywhere made seedless? Please explain the broad principles and not the technicalities.
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1answer
73 views

Do plant-plant interactions inhibit growth?

Plants produce lots of compounds that inhibit (kill or irritate) microorganisms and insects. They have defenses against plant viruses and infections. What kinds of compounds or hormones to plants ...
2
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1answer
68 views

How do some plants grow in salt water, while others die?

My question is basically out of curiosity and comes from observing how certain plants (such as mangroves) can grow in seawater. If this gives the plant an advantage, why haven't all plants that grow ...
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2answers
33 views

In which direction plants' root grow in weightlessness? [duplicate]

As far as I know, roots of plants grow to the direction of Earth's gravity - this is called gravitropism. But what happens if plants are in space? Are they able to perceive gravity in state of ...
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1answer
66 views

What is this plant?

I really like this plant--I'm just wondering what its name is (perhaps genus+species). I think this plant grows in the tropical rainforest in Malaysia. Any suggestions? Thanks!
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1answer
183 views

How do fully dioecious plants determine sex?

I know that a minority of plants are fully dioecious, with adult plants producing either only male or only female flowers. When is this sexual differentiation determined? Is the seed of such a plant ...
2
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1answer
84 views

Is Hypericum Perforatum (St. John's wort) a C3 or C4 plant?

I've been curious as to which photosynthetic cycle St. John's wort uses to synthesise glucose and more complex carbohydrates. I know it probably won't be the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) cycle ...
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1answer
56 views

Is it ok for Chili pepper plant's fruits to fall into its soil?

I wonder if Chili pepper's fruits which fall into the soil near the plant will harm it, since the peppers are so spicy for people.
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1answer
177 views

Why do the sick and unhealthy trees leaf out first in spring?

It's spring. The time of year that trees start to leaf out. I have been watching them, and noticed an interesting pattern. The unhealthy trees of a species leafs out first. I've noticed this ...
2
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1answer
46 views

Is it dangerous to eat a mutated eggplant descended from a radioactive ancestor?

What is the risk, if any, associated with eating a 100th-generation mutated eggplant derived from a radioactive ancestor? In another word, is that possible that organic toxin will be produced by the ...
2
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1answer
27 views

Why do oranges in the US have a small separate part?

Why do oranges in the US have a small separate detachable part at the tip which is separate from the other pods? It looks like a tiny orange itself and has a long fiber attached to it.
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1answer
85 views

what is the difference between early blight of potato and late blight of potato?

apart from different fungus causing these diseases in potato, how are Early Blight of potato and Late blight of potato different?
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1answer
70 views

Is light required for seed germination?

Is light required for germination of every seed? If not, why don't some plants require it? Is there any difference in the quality and duration of light required ? It would be interesting if someone ...
2
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1answer
130 views

Independence of Light independent reaction in photosynthesis?

Inspired by a question asked to me by a classmate, I have the following question about Light-independent (dark phase) reactions in photosynthesis:- Let us suppose an algae sample was exposed to ...
2
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1answer
73 views

Can a plant be programmed to produce any arbitrary object?

I'm wondering if a plant can be programmed (by modifying its genes) to grow into any shape that it's programming instructs. I understand that a plants genes are its instructions of how to convert the ...
2
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2answers
72 views

Tree census data for Sweden/Scandinavia?

Is anyone aware of any attempts to count or approximate the number of trees there are in Sweden or Scandinavia? I have a small popular science side project for which this would be useful
2
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2answers
167 views

Change in conditions of an ecosystem lead to change in organisms

Let's think about the slash and burn method and its effects on the ecosystem. Cutting down trees that rise all the way up to the canopy would expose the plants at ground level to more light, so would ...
2
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1answer
103 views

Photosynthesis - Light Intensity

Say I was conducting an experiment for photosynthesis. If I moved light closer to the plant, what effect would this have on the process of photosynthesis?
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16 views

How does Halosulfuron-methyl kill nutsedge, while leaving lawn grass and most weeds undamaged?

I use Halosulfuron-methyl to control yellow and purple nutsedge in lawns. This chemical acts by interfering with the acetolactate synthase enzyme, which quickly slows cell division, and growth at all ...
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0answers
15 views

Why are watermelons sweeter in the center?

Today I had a slice of watermelon and when I reached the outer parts of the pulp I wondered why those are less sweet. Whether or not the sugar occurs in crystalline form in watermelons is still an ...
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0answers
37 views

Embryo activity during seed dormancy?

What metabolic processes does a dormant embryo in a seed carry out? The newly produced seed will not germinate, either because of a lack of favourable conditions, seed hibernation, or because of a ...
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0answers
30 views

Why is this dry pepper fruit still “powered”?

Check out this photo of my pepper plant this cloudy morning: (click for full res) Usually (and this can be seen on 2 and a half of the 4 fruits in this pic) the fruits are "disconnected" from the ...
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1answer
70 views

What is this plant in the Butler, Pennsylvania area?

This is growing in the woods near my house in the Butler, Pennsylvania area. I have not seen it around before and I have no idea what is it. What is it? Is it poisonous to pets (or little kids)?