The study of plant life; e.g. angiosperms, gymnosperms, bryophytes, pteridophytes, and algae.

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How do individual plants adapt to changes in temperature?

If you grow a plant from seed in your nice warm house, then plant it out in your temperate garden, it will stop growing for a while, possibly die, and if not, subsequently resume growth. Standard ...
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228 views

How do plants intake minerals through their leaves?

How do plants intake the fertilizer when it is sprayed all over the leaf surface as a foliar feed?
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112 views

Why do apples taste sweeter at the bottom?

Sometimes when eating an apple, I notice that the bottom (blossom) end of the apple has a lot more sweetness and flavour to it, whereas the top half (stem) is often more watery, crispier and feels ...
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338 views

Why does wood become darker when it ages?

I have lots of pieces of pine furniture which have different colours depending on how old they are. So, I just wondered why that is. I guess it has something to do with structures and chemical ...
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65 views

Why are some plants frost tender?

Why do some plants have the ability to stand frost, while others can't? Does it have to do with the size of the water vacuoles in the plant cells?
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76 views

Are there ways to speed up the growth of plants?

I'm interested in what humans can do to speed up the rate of growth in a plant. I'm interested in both the context of home gardening and large-scale, institution-backed projects. Obviously, optimal ...
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85 views

How are Raunkiær's plant life forms viewed today?

At the beginning of the 20th century, Raunkiær proposed a typology of plant life-forms based on where they bear their buds, roughly as: cryptophytes: belowground hemicryptophytes: at the surface ...
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71 views

Shade-loving Plants

In shade-loving plants, the light compensation point is reached at low irradiance because: A. Leaves have more chlorophyll per reaction center B. These plants have greatly reduced respiration rates ...
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104 views

What controls leaf senescence in deciduous tree species, and how can I predict it?

If I want to predict litterfall, what data do I need to collect, and what statistical model might I use? For example, I might use the following coding to record phenological stage every other day, or ...
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47 views

Serological assays not detecting native proteins [closed]

Is there anyone out there who has done much work with serological assays? We have antiserum for a manufactured viral protein but no luck so far getting it to detect native protein (unless today's ...
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2answers
287 views

What determines the autumn leaf color?

It is autumn out there. Green, brown, red, yellow, and mixed-colored leaves drop from the trees to the ground. What determines the colors of the leaves? Wikipedia tells me Leaf senescence is the ...
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2answers
71 views

Evolution theory - roses spikes - being more bulgy doesn't give you advantage

I've seen spike, huge spike. And I thought that development of such spikes could be contrary to the evolution theory. Being „little more” spiky doesn’t give you any advantage... So those ...
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368 views

Why doesn't human consumption of plants cause infectious diseases the way consumption of animals can?

At first I want to clarify that I do know that there are naturally poisonous plants and plants that can hold radioactive stuff or toxic material from the environment. What I mean by "diseases" (I ...
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64 views

Identify the plant

Can anyone tell me which plant or flower is this. I have found it in Darjeeling, West Bengal, India.
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41 views

Can plants grow under extreme (>1%) carbon dioxide concentrations?

Related to but distinct from this question due to the concentrations involved. While small carbon dioxide concentration increases can positively impact plant growth under some circumstances and at ...
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1k views

How does a pine cone open?

When a pine cone is wet, it remains closed. However, when it's dry it opens again. From the perspective of physics or biomechanics, what is the mechanism that allows a pine cone to open and close as ...
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1answer
289 views

Sporophyte and gametophyte

My textbook says that in both groups of seedless plants (vascular plants, non-vascular plants) the gametophyte is a free-living plant, independent of the sporophyte. I don't understand this statement ...
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2answers
173 views

Is it possible to grow any kind of plant soilless (hydroponics)?

Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture and is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, without soil. [wikipedia] My question is if is it possible to grow any kind of ...
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126 views

Is a Ginkgo tree a conifer?

I know Ginkgo is a gymnosperm, but I was wondering whether Ginkgo is also technically a conifer. I did a Google search, and found several confident authoritative-sounding answers. Unfortunately, those ...
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76 views

What is the name of this plant with many purple blooms with orange inner parts?

I have photographed the following plant in Pittsburgh, PA. It has many blooms and every bloom is very small (about 5mm diameter), purple on the outer and orange in the inner. You can see it here: ...
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78 views

How much cost would artificial pollination add to common products (fruits etc.)?

I've read about ecosystem services and their possible valuation - statements like "honeybee pollination service in the US is worth 1.6 billion dollars". Is data available on how this would affect the ...
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1answer
151 views

What is the name of this plant?

This plant was found growing in Germany. I have never seen it before, reverse Google image search did not help either. Can you help me identify what type of plant this is? Thanks, looks like it ...
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1answer
148 views

Why are neutral [sterile] female flowers present in inflorescences when they are reproductively incompatible?

In many compound and special inflorescences like spadix and hypanthodium there are sterile female flowers along with male and female fertile flowers and are often present in between male and female ...
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2answers
307 views

Why is the floral biodiversity of grazed grassland higher than that of mown grassland?

I have collected some data to compare the biodiversity of a field in which the plagioclimax is maintained by machine mowing with a field in which the plagioclimax is maintained by sheep grazing. What ...
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2k views

Online course on Plant Taxonomy and Physiology

After following a course in Permaculture, I realised that if I want to get serious about it, I need to be able to distinguish plants. So I am looking for an online Video course on Plant Taxonomy and ...
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383 views

What is the largest perennial herbaceous plant?

What is the largest perennial herbaceous plant? My guess would be some kind of banana or bamboo.
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225 views

Sexual Differentiation in Monoecious plants with unisexual flowers

In monoecious plants having unisexual flowers (eg Zea Mays, Ricinus Communis etc), there must be some mechanism as to produce two sexually distinct flowers from the same genotype. Since both the type ...
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179 views

Function of papain in papaya

I know that papain is a proteolytic enzyme present in papaya. It is often used to tenderise meat. What is the function of papain in papaya? Is papain sweet? Does it function as an antibiotic?
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2k views

Does photosynthesis require only direct sunlight

I have learned throughout my basic science classes in high school that in the process of photosynthesis, plants absorb sunlight & produce food. They use carbon dioxide & water vapour. My ...
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177 views

Plant identification?

Can anyone identify the plant below? It's in a backyard in Pennsylvania, and the photo was taken today.
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15k views

What factors affect the rate of transpiration in plant leaves?

I'm trying to get my head around factors which affect transpiration in leaves. For example, how would applying petroleum jelly to the surface of plant leaves affect their rate of transpiration? I ...
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33 views

Why do plants produce so many hybrids as a kingdom?

Why do plants produce so many hybrids? I have read that they are the largest kingdom of organisms to do so. Does this have something to do with polyploidy events?
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108 views

How does Pothos grow in only water?

The popular potted plant, Pothos aureus (or Epipremnum aureum) is happy to grow in a jar, with only water, for years. How is this possible when other plants need at least Nitrogen, Phosphorus and ...
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2answers
86 views

Is the water transpired by plants pure H₂O, or does it contain trace minerals?

I'm considering the idea of drinking water that I trap from what is transpired by trees. Interestingly, is this water a fairly (or maybe even extraordinarily) pure form of H₂O, a remarkably pure ...
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88 views

H₂S as a source of electrons for plants

The first electron source for plants was H2S, but now most modern plants use H2O as an electron source. What is the advantage of using H2O instead of H2S?
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37 views

How does trees know to balance themselves so that they never fall down [duplicate]

Well i was flying kites today I saw a tree and its branches were spread around in random directions... I would like to know that how do these trees know to nourish their branches in some direction so ...
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200 views

Why are there no trees in Texas?

In Texas, there is lot of grassland and many cotton fields, which need a great deal of water. However, I have not seen any forests or areas with many trees. Why are there no forests or heavily-treed ...
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2answers
363 views

Why are there so many medicinal plants?

Here is wikipedia page containing a list of plants used in herbal medicine. One might first want to argue that many of them actually do not have any medicinal/beneficial effect on heatlth. I think we ...
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4answers
407 views

Do plants with non-green leaves have chlorophyll and photosynthesis?

Is it even possible that plants with non-green leaves have chlorophyll, and do such non-green leaved plants carry out photosynthesis?
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56 views

What virus transforms full grown plants?

I read an article by a gardener describing how a virus had transmitted a negative trait to his plants. It rather shocked me, because I hadn't realized that a virus could transform an adult plant. I ...
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1answer
469 views

Family tree for edible plants?

I am looking for a family tree for plants, particularly veg / herbs / fruit. Something similar to: If it could be slightly less technical than all the Latin ...
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1answer
186 views

Can anyone help me identify this plant?

I have a Chamaerops humilis in my apartment and in there is these small plants growing. I live in Denmark, Europe and my palm tree has only been inside my apartment since i got it. Can anyone ...
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1answer
43 views

What are the mechanistics of stinging nettles?

There is a lot of research on why nettle extracts causes skin irritation and a stinging sensation. However, I cannot find information on how the extract is injected in human skin. Similarly, I haven't ...
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1answer
573 views

What is the name of this flower with purple leaves and orange inner part in NYC?

I've photographed this flower a few days ago in New York City: Does anybody know the name of it? (and how is the orange part called?)
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3answers
535 views

What kind of tree could this be?

This may be a strange question, but does anyone know what kind of tree this could be? I know, it's just a comic, but these trees, at “walking distance” within that comic are easily identifiable as ...
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2answers
85 views

What chemical or biochemical agents do plants use to inhibit each other's growth?

As I just learned, allelopathy is the action by which plants regulate the growth of other nearby plants. I have hear of ethylene is a general signal for growth and fruit ripening in particular, but ...
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1answer
37 views

Plant identification

What plant species is this? Its stalk looks like a grapevine, but the leaves & flowers not. It bloomed this week (Mid-June). I have found it in Turkey, Amasya. If you want, I can add more ...
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2answers
104 views

How common is bacterial mediated transformation? In plants? In animal cells?

The most common method to transform plants is by soaking plant tissue in cultures of agrobacteria (this is not their current classification) which transfer DNA into the plants. Is lateral gene ...
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2answers
425 views

Why do plants' leaves become enlarged in low light areas?

Why do almost all plants in shade have a smaller stem structure and larger leaf than that same species grown in a well lit, sunny area?
3
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1answer
101 views

What does the empty space in the bamboo stem do?

Is the empty space inside a bamboo stem a xylem? And why is the space so large?