The study of plant life; e.g. angiosperms, gymnosperms, bryophytes, pteridophytes, and algae.

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745 views

Is there any natural blue rose?

I had recently read an article that the possibility of having natural blue rose is extremely rare because of the absence of delphinidin in most roses. Are all blue roses just a product of ...
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1answer
116 views

What is Growing on These Tree Leaves?(Image)

I found a seemingly diseased tree when I was out playing tennis yesterday... What is growing on this tree leaf? Is this a disease? If so, is it contagious? I have zero knowledge in botany, but I'm ...
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113 views

How to distinguish those flowers in outskirts: hawkweeds (Hieracium), hawksbeard (Crepis) and hawkbits (Leontodon)?

How to distinguish those flowers of the forest outskirts: hawkweeds (Hieracium), hawksbeard (Crepis) and hawkbits (Leontodon)? I am not asking about concrete species it should be extremely hard since ...
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1answer
635 views

Why does freshly cut grass smell like a watermelon?

I found that, when I smell watermelon aroma outdoors, someone nearby has mowed the grass. Is there an underlying basis?
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2answers
210 views

Why doesn't human consumption of plants cause infectious diseases the way consumption of animals can?

At first I want to clarify that I do know that there are naturally poisonous plants and plants that can hold radioactive stuff or toxic material from the environment. What I mean by "diseases" (I ...
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1answer
99 views

What are these stars in my microscopic image?

I see this very curious patterns on the sun-facing side of a jasmine (probably) leaf - visible with a makeshift microscope (about 50x) What are them? Pores? Are there other plants with similar ...
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1answer
76 views

What happens if we continuously stimulate a mimosa plant?

I know there is some mechanism in humans by which we start to ignore a certain stimuli if it persists for a long time (e.g., we don't feel our shoes all the time !). Can the same thing happen in ...
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1answer
973 views

How do lilies sense day and night and open and close their flowers?

We have lots of lily flowers inside our garden. Their flowers are open in day and closed in night. How do lilies sense day and night and open and close their flowers?
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2answers
139 views

Plant identification?

Can anyone identify the plant below? It's in a backyard in Pennsylvania, and the photo was taken today.
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25 views

Is there a database of pollen-seed distances across plant species?

I was enjoying Richard Smith's excellent answer to this question, and wondered: If you consider the pollen/seed distribution range to be plant locomotion, is there a database that compares these ...
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0answers
102 views

Green feather-like formations in tap water - what is it? (with pictures)

These things recently appeared in my tap water Copenhagen Denmark, this summer 2013. They are very small, and have a feather like structure. I've called the water supply, and they thought that it was ...
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1answer
121 views

Any food crops that could grow in a desert provided that they get fertilizer and water

I am working on an idea to provide nearly unlimited amounts of water in desert regions. To make this commercially viable. I would use the water to irrigate desert sand and grow crops. Given my ...
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2answers
256 views

Why are there so many medicinal plants?

Here is wikipedia page containing a list of plants used in herbal medicine. One might first want to argue that many of them actually do not have any medicinal/beneficial effect on heatlth. I think we ...
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1answer
172 views

Raphide toxicity in Pothos plant

Recently I found out that the common houseplant Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) is toxic to cats and dogs due to the presence of "insoluble raphides." I have a lot of these plants around my house and my ...
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1answer
325 views

What biological processes cause leaves to change colours in Autumn?

I am curious to learn what are the biological mechanisms that cause leaves of deciduous plants to change colour? What happens to the chlorophyll? What environmental phenomena (temperature/air ...
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1answer
130 views

Is chlorophyll living or non living?

Is chlorophyll living or non living, and after boiling the water out of a chlorophyll extract would it still live, as in would it still maintain its properties after re-adding liquid to the dried ...
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1answer
207 views

Has synthetic biology created new plants or animals as of 2013?

I've seen a Ted.com talk where the speaker suggests that modern science can create new micro organisms, like bacteria with a pre- defined new set of traits. But has anyone create a new species of ...
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2answers
79 views

Plant anatomy, what are these stem like filaments growing under the flower

The picture below shows what I am talking about. Each flower has one and I am just wondering what they are?
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1answer
76 views

What is this plant in the Butler, Pennsylvania area?

This is growing in the woods near my house in the Butler, Pennsylvania area. I have not seen it around before and I have no idea what is it. What is it? Is it poisonous to pets (or little kids)?
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2answers
188 views

A source for leaf architecture of different plant species/genus?

I'm currently working on extracting some features of the leaf architecture based on their images (like L:W ratio, laminar shape, ...). I use the Manual of Leaf Architecture as the reference. It is ...
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1answer
87 views

Do non-green flower colors have any functional interactions with the sun?

I always hear the pseudo-evolutionary claim "plants are green because they need to use red and blue light". If this premise to my question is true, What (if any) other functional relationship occur ...
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0answers
22 views

Living organisms with properties similar to both plants and animals? [duplicate]

Is there any example of currently living organisms that shows close resemblance to both being a plant and an animal? What is the plant with the closest possible resemblance to animals, and What is ...
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1answer
1k views

Does photosynthesis require only direct sunlight

I have learned throughout my basic science classes in high school that in the process of photosynthesis, plants absorb sunlight & produce food. They use carbon dioxide & water vapour. My ...
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1answer
67 views

Aside from cockroaches and other insects, which species (of all kinds) are 'immune' to ionizing radiation?

I have just been reading this excellent question and answer about cockroaches ability to withstand ionizing radiation. My question is an extension of that question: aside from insects, which other ...
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1answer
557 views

How do individual plants adapt to changes in temperature?

If you grow a plant from seed in your nice warm house, then plant it out in your temperate garden, it will stop growing for a while, possibly die, and if not, subsequently resume growth. Standard ...
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1answer
36 views

Distribution of nutrients throuought a drink made of plants?

In an attempts to eat my veggies for the day in one shot, I blended together a bag of salad with some water. The mixture separated by density, a thick top layer containing the bits of leaves, and a ...
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1answer
296 views

How do pineapples and lemongrass grow?

You can't plant the leaves, you can't plant the fruit, but, if you plant the part where leaves and fruit meet you will grow a whole pineapple plant. The part of the pineapple where the leaves meet ...
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1answer
103 views

Electron transport in granal stacks

See paper for distribution of PS-I and PS-II within grana As explained in the above paper, the PS-I complex is primarily located within non-appressed thylakoid region and stroma lamella, while PS-II ...
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1answer
86 views

Photosynthesis regulation

I read about the regulation of Calvin cycle by thioredoxin which activates key enzymes essentially by converting disulphide linkages on inactive enzymes into sulfhydryls. Another regulatory mechanism ...
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2answers
194 views

Change in conditions of an ecosystem lead to change in organisms

Let's think about the slash and burn method and its effects on the ecosystem. Cutting down trees that rise all the way up to the canopy would expose the plants at ground level to more light, so would ...
2
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1answer
241 views

How do fully dioecious plants determine sex?

I know that a minority of plants are fully dioecious, with adult plants producing either only male or only female flowers. When is this sexual differentiation determined? Is the seed of such a plant ...
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3answers
430 views

What kind of tree could this be?

This may be a strange question, but does anyone know what kind of tree this could be? I know, it's just a comic, but these trees, at “walking distance” within that comic are easily identifiable as ...
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1answer
113 views

What kind of mushroom(?) is this?

I found groups of these growing in the Lassen National Forest (Susanville, CA, USA). It looks like some sort of mushroom. I have Googled extensively, but can't seem to find a match.
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1answer
61 views

Is Schoons Hard Shell muskmelon a hybrid?

Would Schoon's Hard Shell muskmelon be considered a hybrid as I have read it was a cross between a Bender's Surprise and a Honey Rock.
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1answer
68 views

Resource plant anatomy/lifecycle vocabulary

I've been curious about a lot of vocabulary words in the world of botany. I've had quite a bit of trouble finding somewhere online to help me out, but I'm having some trouble finding a resource like ...
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2answers
336 views

Why do many fruit trees have five-petaled flowers?

Peach, pear, apple, cherry, and many other fruit trees seem to have flowers comprised of five petals. Assuming there is no evolutionary advantage to confusing students of trees, is there a plausible ...
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1answer
225 views

How do animals/plants change for each season?

The question pretty much sums it up. How do animals/plants change for each: Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter? A detailed explanation on distinct behaviour and appearance changes would be nice.
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1answer
185 views

Why does the PR form of phytochrome exist?

I know how it gets converted because PR is more stable and when there is neither red or far red light PFR naturally converts to PR. But what is the point of it? If PFR is the biologically active one ...
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0answers
98 views

Why aren't antheridia and archegonia touching?

Antheridia and archegonia are the two male and female gametangia, respectively, and they are found in bryophytes. To cause fertilization, usually a thin film of water must be present for the sperm ...
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1answer
97 views

Is Hypericum Perforatum (St. John's wort) a C3 or C4 plant?

I've been curious as to which photosynthetic cycle St. John's wort uses to synthesise glucose and more complex carbohydrates. I know it probably won't be the crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) cycle ...
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3answers
288 views

Can plants get cancer?

I can't think of any reason why plants wouldn't be able to get cancer, but I've never heard of a plant growing a tumor. I've also never seen a plant with a noticeable abnormal growth. Can plants get ...
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0answers
85 views

What controls leaf senescence in deciduous tree species, and how can I predict it?

If I want to predict litterfall, what data do I need to collect, and what statistical model might I use? For example, I might use the following coding to record phenological stage every other day, or ...
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1answer
44 views

Can Palisade Cells Survive Independently?

I have been intrigued by this question. Can palisade cells survive independently from its parent plant in a chemical environment? For example, if we were to separate a palisade cell from a plant and ...
3
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1answer
118 views

Why seeds won't sprout given excess water?

What would cause a seed to not sprout despite showing signs of germination given excess water? Oxygen, temperature, and light were sufficient for germination and sprouting in seeds of a slightly ...
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1answer
2k views

How does plant grafting work?

Plant grafting is a process whereby a piece of one plant is inserted into another and results in a change of the original plant. For example, grafting a piece of a lemon tree into a bitter orange tree ...
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3answers
5k views

What's the difference between a plant and an animal?

Are there some living things where the distinction between plant and animal is blurry or unclear? I wouldn't know where to put something like yeast. I also thought of photosynthesis, but then I ...
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2answers
72 views

How common is bacterial mediated transformation? In plants? In animal cells?

The most common method to transform plants is by soaking plant tissue in cultures of agrobacteria (this is not their current classification) which transfer DNA into the plants. Is lateral gene ...
2
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1answer
115 views

Photosynthesis - Light Intensity

Say I was conducting an experiment for photosynthesis. If I moved light closer to the plant, what effect would this have on the process of photosynthesis?
3
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2answers
77 views

What chemical or biochemical agents do plants use to inhibit each other's growth?

As I just learned, allelopathy is the action by which plants regulate the growth of other nearby plants. I have hear of ethylene is a general signal for growth and fruit ripening in particular, but ...
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1answer
77 views

Do plant-plant interactions inhibit growth?

Plants produce lots of compounds that inhibit (kill or irritate) microorganisms and insects. They have defenses against plant viruses and infections. What kinds of compounds or hormones to plants ...