The primary component of the central nervous system, which, along with the spinal cord, controls the body of bilaterally symmetrical beings.

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Sensory adaptation regarding smell and hearing

Imagine the scenario. My friend and I are playing a game of chess near a highway. Initially, I notice the sound of the highway. While I'm playing chess, however, I do not notice it. After the game my ...
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1answer
497 views

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being ambidextrous?

What are the advantages and disadvantages of being ambidextrous? We have two hands and we nearly can't use one and this seems like a weakness, and a stupid one when you first think about it. But ...
2
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0answers
25 views

What is the biological basis of “energy” that extraverted humans draw from social engagements and introverts expend?

This question is related to this question about introverts becoming exhausted after extended social events on cognitive sciences stack exchange. As I read more on the topic of human ...
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45 views

How small does a nanobot have to be to “swim through the brain” and access any neuron it wants to?

I read on this question What is in the space between neurons in a brain? that there is actually not much empty space in a brain. But my question is slightly different. Is there a visual demonstration ...
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2answers
88 views

Can human brain memory be removed by EMP?

The human brain is the most complicated human organ so it is hard to examine it completely but based on what we know do you think (or do you know from some source) if a human memory can be removed by ...
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133 views

Which part of the brain needs to be shut down to lose conciousness?

Whether it is mechanical (trauma), chemical (anaesthesia) or electrical - which part of the brain is shut down to cause loss of consciousness?
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34 views

Resources: Learning About the Brain

I am trying to find some resources to learn more about how the brain functions. Specifically I would like to learn how the basal ganglia works. Encyclopedias and academic papers don't explain things ...
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94 views

Can Panic disorder induce Atrial Fibrillation and Temporary Cardiac Asystole?

This question is partly based on the article "Asystolic pauses in atrial fibrillation. Incidence, dependence on the underlying disease and significance for pacemaker therapy", where the exact ...
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1answer
681 views

Why Do Nerve Signals Get Crossed?

First off, I don't know if this is a normal healthy thing to occur. There have been many times where I have an itch on say my arm and I scratch it, only to feel the scratching elsewhere on my body. I ...
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1answer
67 views

Can the negative afterimage appear only if there is light or is it possible in darkness?

Reading the following paragraph: After staring at the red and blue shamrock, you saw a green and yellow afterimage. Opponent-process theory proposes that as you stared at the red and blue ...
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1answer
45 views

Is there any research paper which identifies left and right brained behavior?

There are many web puzzle to identify, but does it really have any scientific proof? something like - http://braintest.sommer-sommer.com/en/ any logic behind it?
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34 views

MRI with lots of white matter.

Why might an MRI show a large amount of white matter and a low amount of gray matter yet have a full skull with little shrinkage in an above average intelligence primate?
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40 views

Does the Jungian notion of collective unconsciousness have any legitimacy in the light of modern neurobiology and epigenetics?

Carl Jung has long ago proposed a rather controversial notion of collective unconsciousness [1, 2, 3], a form of the unconscious (that part of the mind containing memories and impulses of which ...
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0answers
45 views

When the mind is highly active, roughly how many neurons become excited in one second?

I'm curios to know how many times neurons send signals in one second when the brain is highly active (Highly active meaning during difficult problem solving, or any task that might bring the brain to ...
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0answers
31 views

How can cerebral vasoconstriction lead to decreased O₂ supply?

I am thinking the mechanism from hyperventilation into brain damage: hyperventilation [CO₂] decreases in plasma cerebral vasoconstriction which then decreases the oxygen supply i.e. [O₂] in the ...
4
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1answer
33 views

Effect of Ethanol on Brain Volume Measurements

I want to compare the brain sizes of two populations of fish. However, all the samples I have were fixed in 95% ethanol. As far as I know, 4% formalin is the normal fixative for soft tissues. Can I ...
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1answer
68 views

Why do we suddenly forget things, like PIN or phone numbers, that we've known for years?

Is it common to forget a 4 or 5 numeric code which has been used extensively for months and well remembered? There's an article on the guardian describing this phenomenon and by the number of ...
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0answers
31 views

TV's so loud when I turn over

Scenario: I'm about to fall asleep with the T.V. on. Having completely forgotten that it was, no longer even hearing it, just before falling asleep I turn over with a 'fresh' ear and it's blaring. If ...
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1answer
42 views

How can I determine the purity of cells isolated from rat brains if I cannot use FACS, Immunohistochemistry or SEM anaysis?

Please help. I know how to isolate the different cells (astrocytes, other glial cells, neurons and synaptosomes) from brain tissue using a Ficoll-based separation but how do I determine the purity of ...
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1answer
53 views

Do human neurons in a petri dish do different things from chimpanzee neurons

I want to know if qualitative experiments have been done growing chimpanzee neurons and human neurons in vitro and have any differences emerged, such as the amount of connections per neuron or ...
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1answer
47 views

brain activity responsible for imagination

Which part of brain is responsible for advance or unseen imagination For example:ones brain can make a situation in mind which is impossible to happen ...which part of brain is hyper active?
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3answers
23k views

If the brain has no pain receptors, how come you can get a headache?

I've read many years ago in books, that the brain has no nerves on it, and if someone was touching your brain, you couldn't feel a thing. Just two days before now, I had a very bad migraine, due to a ...
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0answers
9 views

Can the difference in brain-signals between presumptuous thought and considered thought be detected with any existing equipment? [closed]

I am thinking that if we can detect when somebody is being presumptuous we can signal to them that they are and this may reduce mistakes made by humans due to being less than fully cognitive?
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3answers
148 views

What is the difference between different brain regions

The brain is separated into different regions, and different regions perform different tasks. Well, what are the differences between these regions on the cellular/systemic level. The brain is made up ...
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2answers
67 views

Is mammalian vision processed as a sequence of frames?

I often read that people believe that human vision has an inherent frames-per-second rate (FPS) that causes stroboscopic effects - such as seeing the spokes of a rotating wheel apparently rotating at ...
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2answers
126 views

What are the factors that control the speed of propagation of neuronal signals?

If we consider an analogy between a wire and a neuron there may be some resemblance between the factors controlling the data flow rate. For example the increased width of wire leads to decreased ...
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2answers
49 views

Neuronal Architecture of the Brain

To what extent do brains (e.g. of humans) contain recurrent connections? I am studying artificial neuronal networks and frequently encountered the statement, that recurrent neural networks are ...
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1answer
36 views

Is severe but short-term pain worse than moderate but prolonged pain for the body?

I'm wondering about the effects of different durations and intensities of pain on the body. So the two can be compared, let's say that the cause of pain is the same in both cases, but in one the ...
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5answers
3k views

Why do the two hemispheres of the brain control the opposite sides of the body?

Why does the left hemisphere control the right and the right hemisphere control the left? I googled it but didn't find a good answer regarding this. Could someone explain? Does this adaptation help ...
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1answer
49 views

Would it be possible to force the pineal gland to release dimethyltryptamine on command?

To my knowledge, the pineal gland is responsible for the release of dimethyltryptamine (DMT) upon death. Would it be possible to force the pineal gland to release this DMT while still living?
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2answers
59 views

EM Brainwaves VS Brain Wave (EEG) [closed]

The brain purportedly produces very weak EM waves. EEG is a method of measuring electrical brain activity, it has classifications for the types of brain wave it can detect: Theta, Alpha, Beta, Gamma ...
4
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4answers
180 views

Why has evolution made neurons use spiking?

I'm going to be forward and say that I'm not a biologist. I don't claim to fully understand the functionality of a neuron from an electrical/chemical perspective... I'm curiously gazing from the ...
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4answers
194 views

Is there a correlation between total neurons and intelligence?

Thanks for looking. First off, I am not a biologist, just a curious layman, so I apologize in advance if this isn't a "good" question. Please don't downvote me into oblivion. I read today that the ...
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2answers
80 views

How precise is EEG?

Imagine we want to read impulses within single neurons in the brain. Can we do that now for a single region within the brain? If not, what is the smallest region that can be monitored for an activity ...
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2answers
57 views

What is the biological principle of this “holotropic breathwork” technique?

Holotropic breathwork is a non-drug technique developed by Stanislav Grof used in psychotherapy. The therapy as a whole is usually called holotropic breathwork (at least by Grof himself) and will most ...
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1answer
46 views

Recalling memories by electrical impulses?

I've read that in an experiment, a pair of stimulating electrodes were inserted into a blind man's visual cortex, and upon passing electricity, the phosphene phenomenon was produced. Is it the same ...
6
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2answers
150 views

How would the human body adjust to sleep times if we were to live in a place with different day lengths?

You sleep at night and are active during the day that's how things work for humans, but theoretically if a human whose parents lived on earth were to be born in another planet resembling earth but the ...
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1answer
113 views

Why does chewing enrage me?

Whether it's snacking on chips, munching on salad, or simply chewing gum, when I hear someone do it within an earshot, it drives me completely bonkers! It doesn't matter if it's my girlfriend, my ...
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0answers
41 views

How does the frequency of a visual stimulus affect the steady-state visually evoked potential?

I want to make a project for EEG signal processing, and in my research I found the concept of SSVEP, which means that if you have a stimulus with low frequency applied to the eye, the electrical ...
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1answer
789 views

Supercomputer Vs Human Brain

With supercomputers doing calculation in petaflops ($10^{15}$ Calculations per Second), have we crossed the speed of Human Brain?
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1answer
59 views

How Behind is the Human Mind (Latency of the Senses)

I would like to know if there is any research into the latency of human perception. Particulary: What is the minimum time for various inputs (vision, touch, sound) to be recognized by the conscious ...
2
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1answer
46 views

When a thought 'crosses your mind', does it literally cross between left and right cerebral hemispheres?

I've heard that part of cognitive processing is information passing between left and right cerebral hemispheres. This is what happens in the Cerebral Cortex which is divided into two hemispheres, ...
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2answers
614 views

What happens once a brain is full?

I just read the answer to this question, and it got me thinking... If the human brain (or any other brain) has a finite amount of storage, what would happen once the brain has taken in its maximum ...
3
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1answer
328 views

Is there any size limit to the amount of information a human (or other) brain can hold

Im not sure how this would ever be tested but is there a limit to how much the brain can 'hold' before it reaches capacity ? I guess this could also be interpreted in terms of memory, as how well ...
3
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0answers
134 views

What “emotions” can a snake feel?

Short: Thinking in particular of a Royal Python (US: Ball Python) such as some people keep as exotic companion animals, what sorts of "emotions" or "feelings" are they capable of? Long: ...
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1answer
57 views

Is it possible for neurons themselves to manifest cancerous behavior?

From what I understand, one form of cancer is a faulty gene responsible for the programmed death of a cell. Not long ago, popular wisdom used to say neurons don't regenerate. However that is no ...
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0answers
52 views

What causes headaches (biologically)? What does it mean directly? [closed]

Even though your brain can't feel pain, thingies in your head are installed to compensate for that. Once I thought your head starts to hurt when your brain is tired. I can't believe this any more. ...
3
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2answers
141 views

How is information sent from limbs to the brain exactly?

Say you have a needle, and you poke a very specific area on your left thumb. A signal gets sent from that nerve up your spine and into your brain. How does the brain know exactly where this signal ...
3
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1answer
62 views

Brain response frequencies while sleeping

I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask this but Biology seemed to fit best. I'm trying to find out what frequencies the brain responds to best while sleeping. The reason for this is recently ...
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71 views

Electrodes in the brain and 'repetitive orgasms' [closed]

The advent of chlorpromazine in 1955 put an end to one of the more bizarre chapters in American psychiatry.$^1$ Dr. Robert Heath implanted wires or delivered injections of acetylcholine (a ...