A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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2answers
86 views

Why should a tumor look like a crab?

Origin of the word cancer The disease was first called cancer by Greek physician Hippocrates (460-370 BC). He is considered the “Father of Medicine.” Hippocrates used the terms carcinos and ...
3
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1answer
21 views

Regarding tumors and their developement

If certain cells or tissue in a specific part of the body are for some reason overworked; like the cases of severe acid reflux damaging the throat repeatedly and the cells in the throat having to do ...
0
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0answers
27 views

Cigarette consumption dose-response function WRT health outcomes

I'm curious how health risks (mortality, lifetime probability of cancer, etc) change with cigarette consumption. Specifically, treatring cigarette consumption like a continuous variable, rather than ...
-3
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1answer
73 views

Henrietta Lacks and HeLa cells

Why did Henrietta Lacks die when her cells didn't die? As I understand it only the cells from her cervix were immortal so perhaps the cervical cancer took her life and the cells never died.
2
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1answer
31 views

Regarding the apoptosis mechanisms in cells and cancer

If all the cells in a cancerous tumour had their apoptosis mechanisms 'turned back on' or reactivated or repaired by some 'yet to be discovered' process would this cause the tumour to 'self destruct' ...
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0answers
5 views

About artificially induced processes that would normally cause a cell to self-destruct

Are there certain biochemical processes that would normally cause a cell to self-destruct but if the cell being tested has apoptosis mechanisms that have malfunctioned or been 'turned off' the cell ...
2
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1answer
123 views

Is excessive hydration a risk factor for cancer in humans?

I was reading a book on radiation biology, and the book describes the process of "indirect action", where radiation can first ionize a water molecule forming a free radical, which then may interact ...
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0answers
16 views

Tumour resistance: single-cell or population effect?

Drug resistance can arise through a number of mechanisms. For instance, EGFR mutation when treating with EGFR inhibitors, or compensatory activation of alternative survival pathways. But does it occur ...
2
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1answer
36 views

Do metastatic cells still have their parent's identity?

If a liver cancer, for example, gives metastases. Will metastatic cells still have liver identity? I mean, if we mark liver cells, will we see the cancer cells too? Thanks a lot!
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0answers
28 views

Cells with no apoptosis mechanism and their 'byproducts'

If a culture or sample of cells is such they all have no apoptosis mechanisms yet they have not been at present determined to be cancerous ; given such a cell culture is there a way to determine by ...
0
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1answer
26 views

Could transfusion of a different blood type cure blood-based cancers?

Different antigen detection triggers an immune system response that could perhaps stimulate mitochondria and such in killing cancer cells - something like chemo without the hair-loss?
1
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0answers
23 views

Regarding benign tumors and what 'stops' them

Benign tumors can grow to dangerous size yet are they capable of metastisizing ; if not what stops this? Also with a benign tumor if you call its cells 'near' its edges its tumor 'cell wall' I was ...
3
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2answers
65 views

Can radiation equilevant to 1 CT (computer tomography) scan causes significant changes in human body?

I've read that CT scan causes radiation equivalent to few hundreds of ordinary X ray scan. It sound scary at the first look of it but I wonder is it the amount considered significant? Can dosage equal ...
3
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1answer
86 views

How does electrolarynx work?

I have heard that this is an effective replacement for patients who have a dysfunctional larynx, partly due to cancer. I am curious to know the inner working of this device and why such a robotic ...
3
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1answer
58 views

About sharks and how they find fish

Other than olfactory senses do sharks use some kind of sense that uses electromagnetic waves? Is this similar to an electric eel? I saw a book with the cover statement 'Sharks never get cancer'. IS ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

About excessive cellular growth

When there is 'excessive' cell growth 'ordered' by the human body in some specific part of the body that is not part of the usual repairing mechanisms, does this cause extra telomere 'shortening' or ...
2
votes
2answers
91 views

Regarding cancer cells and telomeres

If cancer cells have telomeres are they different than the telomeres in non-cancerous cells? Would cancer cell telomeres be somehow 'set-up' to function almost indefinitely; in other words are 'they' ...
5
votes
1answer
208 views

How fast do cancer cells divide, compared to normal cells?

This question suggests that we have, on average, 50-70 billion cell divisions per day. I just read that cancer cells divide more often and are therefore more prone to radiation. I am wondering, for ...
5
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2answers
33 views

Regarding cellular self-destruction

I heard and read telomere 'health' or 'length' ( if that's right ) has alot to do with cell 'health'. If telomere 'abilities' are 'restored' to a 'healthier' status then the cell it is in functions as ...
0
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0answers
11 views

SRC & RSV virus origins

When a virus infects a cell it undergoes recombination with cell genome. I understand how recombination happens. So in the process, is a gene from virus delivered into human genome or human genome ...
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0answers
27 views

Segregation Analysis for predicting age-specific cancer risk [closed]

I am relatively new to the world of genetics research and have been tasked with presenting to my lab the potential value of a paper that uses Complex Segregation Analysis for a risk analysis. The hope ...
4
votes
2answers
50 views

Are there known downsides to removing UV mutation hotspots to prevent some skin cancers (Genetic sunblock)?

Khavari et al. recently demonstrated that a significant fraction of one of the major forms of skin cancer (cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas) are associated with a mutated KNSTRN gene (a protein ...
0
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2answers
155 views

Does scratched Teflon coated frying pans contain carcinogens which can cause cancer? [closed]

Is it true that using scratched Teflon-coated pans contain carcinogens, and if so, can they be consumed through the food cooked in them? E.g. The deadly toxins from non-stick frying pans
2
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0answers
21 views

Subtypes of Acute myeloid leukemia

I am a computer scientist with no biological background and working on analyzing lab results of patients with Acute myeloid leukemia. They have been tagged with following subtypes of AML: AML with ...
0
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1answer
39 views

Regarding apoptosis and turning it 'back on'

Is there some chemical or chemicals or even special molecules that can be 'injected' into cancer cells that will turn any Apoptosis mechanisms 'back on'? Or maybe chemicals and/or molecules that ...
4
votes
1answer
25 views

How to make sure a stem cell culture is cancer free?

Say I take a blood sample from an adult, extract the white cells and apply to them the process described in <this article>. Assuming this actually turns the adult white cells into stem cells, which ...
3
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1answer
30 views

Regarding apoptosis and inhibitors

If there is an apoptosis shut-off mechanism of any kind, one could call it a null-apoptosis mechanism. If this is possible, could there be a null-apoptosis inhibitor? Something that inhibits an ...
4
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1answer
131 views

which signalling pathway is involved in cancer?

Columnar epithelial cells from the colonic mucosa are studied to identify abnormalities in cell signaling pathways. Abnormal epithelial cells from colonic adenocarcinoma are shown to have a mutation ...
2
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1answer
28 views

Classify chemotherapy drugs?

I'm studying a TCGA dataset trying to find correlations between gene expression and clinical data which might shed light on some pathways. One column of the clinical data provides a list of ...
4
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2answers
188 views

Are all mutagens carcinogens?

Not all carcinogens are mutagens. Alcohol and estrogen, for example, do not damage DNA. It's one of the assumptions of the Ames test that mutagenicity implies carcinogenicity, but is this always the ...
1
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1answer
341 views

What are garlic's effects on DHT?

Most antiandrogens inhibit DHT. DHT is connected to testosterone. [1] shows a beneficial effect on prostate cancer which can be caused by DHT. However, according to [2] garlic also increases ...
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2answers
82 views

Cancer cure statistics questions

I have a question about cancer cure statistics. Many of the cancer literature or databases I have come across speak about 5 year or 10 year survival rates. In this case survival means that the patient ...
3
votes
2answers
69 views

Cancer growth and cell division [closed]

I am confused about the prerequisites for cell division and cancer. Which of the following is necessary for the cell cycle to progress? Hormones Growth factor Cyclins Cyclin dependent kinases ...
0
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0answers
18 views

About the Heart and cancer [duplicate]

I read cancerous growth in the heart is rare . Why is that? Cancer cells are very unstable yet can function somehow. Could the Heart's intense pulses of electromagnetic energy make it alot harder for ...
2
votes
3answers
202 views

Why cancer mutations do accumulate sequentially?

According to Knudson hypothesis, cancer mutations accumulate in order. Statistics says, that cancer probability increases as sixth order of age, which may mean six consequential steps to cancer. But, ...
1
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1answer
32 views

Is it firmly established, that mutations are sufficient for cancer?

It is evident for scientists, that all cancer cells have some mutated genes. Say mutations in general. But this evidence means necessary condition. But what about sufficient conditions? Is it ...
0
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0answers
33 views

How is the growth of benign tumors suppressed?

A benign tumor has an outer layer of cancerous cells beyond which are regular cells (I Think). The Tumor must have some kind of boundary layer like a wall where somehow the cancerous cells can't ...
6
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2answers
205 views

Can oncogenesis happen without apoptosis pathway being affected?

Has there ever been incidences of one or more cancerous cells having all it's cell-death pathways and apoptosis mechanisms intact and functional?
1
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1answer
26 views

Regarding cancer cells and radio-frequency ablation

Are cancer cells destabilized if near a strong electromagnetic field over a long period of time? I read this technique of using radio-frequency ablation and heat shock to kill cancer cells. I don't ...
1
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1answer
47 views

About stem cells and Cancer

Do stem cells have an apoptosis mechanism and , if they do could this be used to repair the cell self-destruction pathways in a cancer cell?
1
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1answer
56 views

Could the Warburg effect be used to starve cancer cells in situ?

What is wrong with the following chain of reasoning? Nearly all cancer cells rely on high rates of glucose uptake (upto 200 times more than normal cells). This is known as the the Warburg effect. ...
1
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1answer
49 views

Do cell walls prevent cancer?

To my knowledge plants do not have an uncontrolled growth disease similar to cancer. Is the function by which they avoid uncontrolled growth related to their cell wall and preventing damage to ...
1
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2answers
404 views

TCGA gene expression data are missing matched normal

I'm trying to use the TCGA data portal to get gene expression data for cancer tissues, but I'm not sure what "Tumor matched normal" means. It is unclear to me if the values are already compared to a ...
2
votes
1answer
90 views

Are cell lines potentially dangerous?

More specifically, if a human subject was exposed to, say, a human cancerous cell line (via intravenous injection or through an open wound, for example), is it possible that they would develop any ...
1
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2answers
66 views

In what ways can mechanisms of apoptosis be damaged?

How many ways can an Apoptosis mechanism be made disfunctional or irreparably damaged? If a cell has damaged Apoptosis mechanisms and it divides will its daughter cells have such damage?
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2answers
24 views

Concerning Apoptosis

What if cellular growth and repair is 'forced' to occur repeatedly in a region where it wouldn't normally happen , if the biological area was 'healthier'. Could this more aggressive cellular growth ...
4
votes
1answer
84 views

Do cancer cells give off specific chemical signatures?

Do cancer cells give off specific chemical signatures? Are these signatures different from normal cells?
1
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1answer
34 views

If a gene altered causes cancer and creates a protein for cancer can the new protein be isolated in some way?

In the above title question, can the protein thats altered not be isolated (to separate out from other proteins) somehow? Is there nothing that can bind to the specific cancer proteins that will not ...
1
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2answers
72 views

Epithelial cells and Rhinovirus

If you injected a tumor with epithelial cells infected with the Rhinovirus, would this still evoke an immune response as it would with the respiratory system? Secondly, what is the specific reason the ...
2
votes
1answer
29 views

Evolutionary rationale behind migration proteins

Tumor cells are able to migrate due to specific migration proteins. What is their evolutionary origin? Or are they simply deregulated?