A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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Endogenous PAF inhibitor in metastatic process (?)

When neoplastic cells cause a metastasis, they can create a protective coat of platelets that counterbalances immunitary response. My question is if the coat formed due to PAF can be undone by an ...
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1answer
95 views

Are low-intensity radio-waves carcinogenic?

A recent review article, Oxidative mechanisms of biological activity of low-intensity radiofrequency radiation reached a surprising conclusion our analysis demonstrates that low-intensity RFR ...
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1answer
38 views

Why doesn't Manipulated Virus for Cancer Cure Work [closed]

I'm not a biologist but I have an idea for a cure for cancer and it is very simple and probably has flaws (if it worked it probrably wouldn't be a cure for all) or is not possible but ... I'm still ...
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1answer
43 views

What specific mutations can cause an apoptosis mechanism to malfunction?

What specific mutations can cause the apoptosis mechanisms in a cell to malfunction? Are any such mutations 'reversible' , somehow or are they generally permanent? what kind of mutations can happen ...
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1answer
66 views

Why does T-cell Cancer Therapy require a large tumor mutanome?

An article I read about Neuroblastoma states that the fact that Neuroblstoma has a small mutanome means that it is not viable to apply the classic T-cell immunotherapy. Why is this so? The article can ...
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2answers
38 views

Deciding a reasonable threshold for copy number variation in a CNV (SNP array) TCGA dataset

Is there a methodology to select a reasonable threshold for copy number variation in a CNV (SNP array) TCGA dataset, to define when there is a significative alteration? Can I download CNV data for ...
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32 views

Cell Line With DNMT3a Mutation

I am looking for a cell line (preferably hematopoietic) that has an inactivating DNMT3a mutation. I have checked the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia but of all the hematopoietic cell lines I know I ...
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2answers
88 views

Can you Transfer Cancer Between People via Saliva or other Bodily Fluids?

This may sound like a strange question. But could a Cancerous cell be transferred from one person to another from Oral contact e.g. Through Saliva, or other exchange of bodily fluids? I know that ...
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62 views

Why is cisplatin a very potent antineoplastic for testicular cancer, but not necessarily for other cancers?

Cisplatin (structure below) is a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent which is very effective in the treatment of some cancers. Its introduction was responsible for improving the cure rate for ...
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1answer
54 views

GATK workflow for Cancer

I am just starting to learn to use bioinformatics tools. My university has a limited and expensive bioinformatics team, so I'm mostly on my own except for big questions. I am planning to use GATK to ...
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26 views

Can photosyntetic cells be genetically modified to grow at a faster rate?

I hope the question is not silly, but I wonder if a sort of genetically modified plant "cancer" could be used for carbon sequestration. For example, cancer cells like HeLa have been reproduced in ...
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3answers
37 views

Doxorubicin's intercalant and topoisomerase inhibition in leukemia?

I am thinking the role of doxorubicin's pathways in cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma: topoisomerase inhibitor and inhibit DNA activity intercalant - intercalant DNA bases and inhibit DNA ...
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68 views

How can electric fields inhibit tumor growth?

In MIT's Technology review it is explained that electric fields can cause dividing cancer cells to explode, while these fields have no significant impact on non-dividing tissues. The original research ...
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1answer
15 views

What's a segmented copy number profile

I am studying copy-number variation. I am reading C. H. Mermel, S. E. Schumacher, B. Hill, M. L. Meyerson, R. Beroukhim, and G. Getz, “GISTIC2.0 facilitates sensitive and confident localization ...
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2answers
41 views

Why do epithelial cells arrest in response to serum?

Primary epithelial cells, for example human mammary epithelium, fail to proliferate (arrest) in serum-containing medium. Therefore, a common growth medium for epithelium contains pituitary extract ...
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1answer
78 views

Does homeopathic or herbal treatment of cancer have any scientific recognition?

Even though we have a very high tech society, cancer is still a serious issue. We humans still are not entirely capable of fighting cancer. Radiation and chemotherapy are still considered the best ...
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2answers
63 views

What are multicell spheroids?

I'm from a maths background and I'm doing some research on mathematical models of cancer. I've come across alot of literature mentioning "multicell spheroids" in the context of avascular tumours. I ...
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1answer
33 views

How is cancer associated with host pathogen interaction?

Does cancer by any chance fall under host pathogen interaction domain? What I mean to ask is that, is there pathogen interaction involved in cancer? I went through this article: ...
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1answer
35 views

How does cancer of the larynx (laryngeal cancer) affect the respiratory system?

The larynx is part of the respiratory system and is responsible for producing sound (our voices). My question is how cancer in the larynx (voice box) affect the respiratory system overall? I ...
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0answers
47 views

Why is chemotherapy so expensive? [closed]

I have two questions related to the price of chemotherapy: I was told it was expensive, but was not able to put numbers on it. Where could I find information regarding the actual price of a given ...
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2answers
24 views

Difference between taking tissue of cancer from secondary place or primary place

Are there any differences when a surgeon takes tissue from secondary place (for example from metastasis) rather then from primary place (from an organ where cancer is) for morphological research?
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40 views

Y Chromosome in Ovary Cancer Data

I have been analyzing TCGA Ovary Cancer data. In Somatic Mutation data, there is data of mutations in all the chromosomes (1-22 and X), but amazingly, I have found one (just one) row of Y Chromosome ...
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1answer
27 views

What is the most reliable tumour suppressing gene for NSCLC?

I was looking at some tumour suppressing genes that can be helpful in diagnosing lung cancer (particularly NSCLC - Non-small-cell lung carcinoma) at an early stage. I came across a few such as p53, ...
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3answers
102 views

Can we knock out Caspase-9 *and* avoid breast cancer phenotype in our mouse model?

I am trying to design a wet lab experiment with no wet lab experience to name. Right now, in my dream land, it would be excellent if it were possible to create a Caspase-9 knockout mouse (damage to ...
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1answer
41 views

How can the phenotypic effects of a tumor suppressor mutation be silenced?

I've been reading a little about the "two-hit" hypothesis for tumor suppressor genes here, which mentions that some genes exhibiting haploinsufficiency are exceptions to the hypothesis. I've read ...
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1answer
34 views

How to tell if a given gene is a tumor suppressor or oncogene?

This is a problem taken from "Concepts of Genetics", Klug et al, 10e. I'm given the following table about the mutations in the BRCA1 gene: $$\begin{array}{c|c|c|c|c} ...
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2answers
78 views

Difficulties understanding a pathway [closed]

I am not a biologist and I would love to understand what is going on with this pathway. I went to the description but it's still complicated, and I couldn't follow. Can someone please help me with it? ...
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3answers
74 views

Can bioluminescence be used for cancer or tumor detection? [closed]

What diagnostic applications, if any, are there in using bioluminescence to detect cancer or tumors (in vivo)?
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88 views

Contact Inhibition of Cell Division: Signaling Pathway

The following article refers to contact inhibition of cell division in epithelial cells, specifically MDCK cells: Collective and single cell behavior in epithelial contact inhibition. In their review ...
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1answer
132 views

Telomerase as cancer target

There are a lot of publications, starting from 2000, about using telomerase for targeting cancer cells (it is upregulated in more than 80-90% of tumor cells). Specifically using its promoter (hTERT). ...
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1answer
107 views

What type of flask should I use to culture NTERA2 embryonic cancer stem cells?

I'm just starting my MSc research and I am in the process of making a list of equipments/consumables to order. Is there a specific flask in which I can culture NTERA2 (NTERA2/D1) cell line?
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1answer
27 views

What are the roles of cadherins in epithelial mesenchymal transitions? [closed]

I know that cadherins control the expression of cancer cells involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal transitions, but I was wondering exactly how the process worked.
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1answer
38 views

Enzyme\Protein amounts in cancer

I am searching for source, that providing information about enzymes\proteins, in different types of cancers, that their amount in cell is significantly higher - comparing to normal, healthy cell. ...
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1answer
29 views

Mitochondria variability per tissue in humans?

I would like to know the distribution of mitochondrial content per tissue type in humans. I understand the simple metric that energetically active or energy requiring tissues will have more ...
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1answer
111 views

Why do people with Down syndrome get fewer cancers?

I'm coming across some conflicting information regarding the correlation between cancer incidents and trisomy 21. I read a report from nature that discusses how Downs are only a tenth as likely to ...
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1answer
28 views

What sort of assay could be used to identify mutants with mutator phenotype? [closed]

By mutator phenotype, I mean being more prone to mutations, for example due to mutations in genes involved in DNA repair. I was thinking about exposing the cells to agents that damage DNA (uv light, ...
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2answers
58 views

Why mutations in genes involved in general processes like DNA repair increase the risk of developing specific types of cancer?

For example, mutation in MHS2, which encodes a protein involved in the repair of mismatches that occur during DNA replication, dramatically increases the risk of developing colon cancer. (There are ...
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0answers
21 views

How can I classify Breast Cancer if I have incomplete receptor information?

I have a clinical data table for a cohort of Breast Cancer patients and I want to classify them as being either triple negative or triple positive. You can find the file here. For some of the ...
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0answers
72 views

Where can I find mutation datasets for cancer (other than TCGA)?

My lab has been using TCGA data (somatic mutations and clinical data) to develop panels of genes and of mutations we expect to see in certain cancer populations. We'd like to validate our panels by ...
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1answer
65 views

Expression/Mechanism of ROR1 in healthy tissue

ROR1 is currently under investigation as a therapeutic target for cancer (1). A number of studies show different cancers may have their metastatic potential reduced, or become apoptotic through ...
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2answers
60 views

All UniprotIDs of a cancer pathway

I need to download all uniprotIDs of a cancer pathway, say the AKT Signaling. It may be super easy, but I don't know which resource to look at since it is a new field. How/where do I find these?
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1answer
67 views

Why is it important to study chromatin to understand cancer?

Many labs and many projects in biology institutes and university departments have been starting to study chromatin. Chromatin states, chromatin interactions, chromatin loopings, chromatin behaviours, ...
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1answer
96 views

What does it mean when a patient suffering from malignant tumor (cancer) has been declared cured?

Comment by Anongoodnurse, has made me curious as to what a doctor means when (s)he says "The cancer is cured" to a patient. My idea up till this point (based on what I read and what I learned in my ...
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2answers
141 views

What are the differences between a benign tumor and swelling?

What are the differences between a benign tumor and an injury related swelling? And can swellings due to injury turn into a benign tumor?
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3answers
667 views

Have there been studies done to test Immortality of cancer cells in culture?

This website on cultured cancer cells () says cancer cells may be immortal. I am wondering if there has been any research done to find if cancer cells are really immortal. How old is the still ...
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1answer
32 views

Why does a tumour's genome change depending on the environment?

According to the book "Primer of The Molecular Biology of Cancer" by Vincent, Theodore and Ateven, the tumour cell is changed depending on its environment. performed genome-wide analysis on three ...
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648 views

What are the differences between cancer and tumour?

What are the differences between cancer and tumour? I mean is it in the DNA or shape or something else... And how can a benign tumour turn into a malignant tumour? The body has a lot of tumours all ...
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1answer
38 views

The damage of cancer cells

I read about the molecular biology of cancer, and I have a mess on my head and a lot of questions.. . My primary question is- The damage of the cancer cells is in the dna sequence or in the gene ...
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1answer
110 views

Does increased cell turnover cause cancerous mutations?

If a certain set of cells or tissue are undergoing a lot of reproduction and repair cycles for some reason, does this inevitably lead to cancerous growths? If the mutation rate exceeds the normal ...
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1answer
57 views

Energy metabolism in Cancer cells

The TCA cycle intermediate Isocitrate dehydrogenase commonly undergoes point mutations in cancers. This allows IDH to reduce a-Ketogluterate to 2Hydoxygluterate, causing a reduction in pVHLs ability ...