A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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What sort of assay could be used to identify mutants with mutator phenotype?

By mutator phenotype, I mean being proner to mutations, for example due to mutations in genes involved in DNA repair. I was thinking about exposing the cells to agents that danificate DNA (uv light, ...
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Why mutations in genes involved in general processes like DNA repair increase the risk of developing specific types of cancer?

For example, mutation in MHS2, which encodes a protein involved in the repair of mismatches that occur during DNA replication, dramatically increases the risk of developing colon cancer. (There are ...
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Is it possible to cause cancer in another person? [closed]

Is it possible to poison someone's food on a daily basis in order to give them cancer? The thing here is that i'm worried someone at my workplace might be poisoning other people's water (each ...
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How can I classify Breast Cancer if I have incomplete receptor information?

I have a clinical data table for a cohort of Breast Cancer patients and I want to classify them as being either triple negative or triple positive. You can find the file here. For some of the ...
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Where can I find mutation datasets for cancer (other than TCGA)?

My lab has been using TCGA data (somatic mutations and clinical data) to develop panels of genes and of mutations we expect to see in certain cancer populations. We'd like to validate our panels by ...
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Expression/Mechanism of ROR1 in healthy tissue

ROR1 is currently under investigation as a therapeutic target for cancer (1). A number of studies show different cancers may have their metastatic potential reduced, or become apoptotic through ...
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All UniprotIDs of a cancer pathway

I need to download all uniprotIDs of a cancer pathway, say the AKT Signaling. It may be super easy, but I don't know which resource to look at since it is a new field. How/where do I find these?
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Why is it important to study chromatin to understand cancer?

Many labs and many projects in biology institutes and university departments have been starting to study chromatin. Chromatin states, chromatin interactions, chromatin loopings, chromatin behaviours, ...
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45 views

What does it mean when a patient suffering from malignant tumor (cancer) has been declared cured?

Comment by Anongoodnurse, has made me curious as to what a doctor means when (s)he says "The cancer is cured" to a patient. My idea up till this point (based on what I read and what I learned in my ...
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What are the differences between a benign tumor and swelling?

What are the differences between a benign tumor and an injury related swelling? And can swellings due to injury turn into a benign tumor?
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594 views

Have there been studies done to test Immortality of Cancer Cells on culture?

The article here says cancer cells may be immortal. I am wondering if there has been any research done to find if cancer cells are really immortal. How old is the still maintained living oldest ...
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1answer
19 views

Why does a tumour's genome change depending on the environment?

According to the book "Primer of The Molecular Biology of Cancer" by Vincent, Theodore and Ateven, the tumour cell is changed depending on its environment. performed genome-wide analysis on three ...
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What are the differences between cancer and tumour?

What are the differences between cancer and tumour? I mean is it in the DNA or shape or something else... And how can a benign tumour turn into a malignant tumour? The body has a lot of tumours all ...
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1answer
34 views

The damage of cancer cells

I read about the molecular biology of cancer, and I have a mess on my head and a lot of questions.. . My primary question is- The damage of the cancer cells is in the dna sequence or in the gene ...
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1answer
64 views

Does increased cell turnover cause cancerous mutations?

If a certain set of cells or tissue are undergoing a lot of reproduction and repair cycles for some reason, does this inevitably lead to cancerous growths? If the mutation rate exceeds the normal ...
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Energy metabolism in Cancer cells

The TCA cycle intermediate Isocitrate dehydrogenase commonly undergoes point mutations in cancers. This allows IDH to reduce a-Ketogluterate to 2Hydoxygluterate, causing a reduction in pVHLs ability ...
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Superpatients for Cancer resistance

I was reading an article on MIT Technology review about superpatients for low cholesterol that got me thinking whether such patients exist for cancer. The article is ...
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44 views

About the apoptosis mechanisms in a cell

The apoptosis mechanisms in a cell are like a type of 'self-destruction mechanism': is this correct? As with any type of complex system with various necessary functions, if it has a set of ...
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26 views

About radiation therapy

With radiation therapy, could some of the radiation used cause new mutations in non-cancerous cells that are near the tumour that is being irradiated? If so could these new mutations lead to new ...
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158 views

Why should a tumor look like a crab?

Origin of the word cancer The disease was first called cancer by Greek physician Hippocrates (460-370 BC). He is considered the “Father of Medicine.” Hippocrates used the terms carcinos and ...
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Regarding tumors and their developement

If certain cells or tissue in a specific part of the body are for some reason overworked; like the cases of severe acid reflux damaging the throat repeatedly and the cells in the throat having to do ...
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36 views

Cigarette consumption dose-response function WRT health outcomes

I'm curious how health risks (mortality, lifetime probability of cancer, etc) change with cigarette consumption. Specifically, treatring cigarette consumption like a continuous variable, rather than ...
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1answer
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Henrietta Lacks and HeLa cells

Why did Henrietta Lacks die when her cells didn't die? As I understand it only the cells from her cervix were immortal so perhaps the cervical cancer took her life and the cells never died.
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Regarding the apoptosis mechanisms in cells and cancer

If all the cells in a cancerous tumour had their apoptosis mechanisms 'turned back on' or reactivated or repaired by some 'yet to be discovered' process would this cause the tumour to 'self destruct' ...
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1answer
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About artificially induced processes that would normally cause a cell to self-destruct

Are there certain biochemical processes that would normally cause a cell to self-destruct but if the cell being tested has apoptosis mechanisms that have malfunctioned or been 'turned off' the cell ...
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1answer
125 views

Is excessive hydration a risk factor for cancer in humans?

I was reading a book on radiation biology, and the book describes the process of "indirect action", where radiation can first ionize a water molecule forming a free radical, which then may interact ...
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Tumour resistance: single-cell or population effect?

Drug resistance can arise through a number of mechanisms. For instance, EGFR mutation when treating with EGFR inhibitors, or compensatory activation of alternative survival pathways. But does it occur ...
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1answer
37 views

Do metastatic cells still have their parent's identity?

If a liver cancer, for example, gives metastases. Will metastatic cells still have liver identity? I mean, if we mark liver cells, will we see the cancer cells too? Thanks a lot!
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Cells with no apoptosis mechanism and their 'byproducts'

If a culture or sample of cells is such they all have no apoptosis mechanisms yet they have not been at present determined to be cancerous ; given such a cell culture is there a way to determine by ...
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Could transfusion of a different blood type cure blood-based cancers?

Different antigen detection triggers an immune system response that could perhaps stimulate mitochondria and such in killing cancer cells - something like chemo without the hair-loss?
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Regarding benign tumors and what 'stops' them

Benign tumors can grow to dangerous size yet are they capable of metastisizing ; if not what stops this? Also with a benign tumor if you call its cells 'near' its edges its tumor 'cell wall' I was ...
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2answers
82 views

Can radiation equilevant to 1 CT (computer tomography) scan causes significant changes in human body?

I've read that CT scan causes radiation equivalent to few hundreds of ordinary X ray scan. It sound scary at the first look of it but I wonder is it the amount considered significant? Can dosage equal ...
3
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1answer
202 views

How does electrolarynx work?

I have heard that this is an effective replacement for patients who have a dysfunctional larynx, partly due to cancer. I am curious to know the inner working of this device and why such a robotic ...
3
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1answer
61 views

About sharks and how they find fish

Other than olfactory senses do sharks use some kind of sense that uses electromagnetic waves? Is this similar to an electric eel? I saw a book with the cover statement 'Sharks never get cancer'. IS ...
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1answer
41 views

About excessive cellular growth

When there is 'excessive' cell growth 'ordered' by the human body in some specific part of the body that is not part of the usual repairing mechanisms, does this cause extra telomere 'shortening' or ...
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2answers
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Regarding cancer cells and telomeres

If cancer cells have telomeres are they different than the telomeres in non-cancerous cells? Would cancer cell telomeres be somehow 'set-up' to function almost indefinitely; in other words are 'they' ...
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How fast do cancer cells divide, compared to normal cells?

This question suggests that we have, on average, 50-70 billion cell divisions per day. I just read that cancer cells divide more often and are therefore more prone to radiation. I am wondering, for ...
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2answers
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Regarding cellular self-destruction

I heard and read telomere 'health' or 'length' ( if that's right ) has alot to do with cell 'health'. If telomere 'abilities' are 'restored' to a 'healthier' status then the cell it is in functions as ...
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0answers
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SRC & RSV virus origins

When a virus infects a cell it undergoes recombination with cell genome. I understand how recombination happens. So in the process, is a gene from virus delivered into human genome or human genome ...
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2answers
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Are there known downsides to removing UV mutation hotspots to prevent some skin cancers (Genetic sunblock)?

Khavari et al. recently demonstrated that a significant fraction of one of the major forms of skin cancer (cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas) are associated with a mutated KNSTRN gene (a protein ...
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2answers
255 views

Does scratched Teflon coated frying pans contain carcinogens which can cause cancer? [closed]

Is it true that using scratched Teflon-coated pans contain carcinogens, and if so, can they be consumed through the food cooked in them? E.g. The deadly toxins from non-stick frying pans
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0answers
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Subtypes of Acute myeloid leukemia

I am a computer scientist with no biological background and working on analyzing lab results of patients with Acute myeloid leukemia. They have been tagged with following subtypes of AML: AML with ...
0
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1answer
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Regarding apoptosis and turning it 'back on'

Is there some chemical or chemicals or even special molecules that can be 'injected' into cancer cells that will turn any Apoptosis mechanisms 'back on'? Or maybe chemicals and/or molecules that ...
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1answer
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How to make sure a stem cell culture is cancer free?

Say I take a blood sample from an adult, extract the white cells and apply to them the process described in <this article>. Assuming this actually turns the adult white cells into stem cells, which ...
3
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1answer
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Regarding apoptosis and inhibitors

If there is an apoptosis shut-off mechanism of any kind, one could call it a null-apoptosis mechanism. If this is possible, could there be a null-apoptosis inhibitor? Something that inhibits an ...
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1answer
150 views

which signalling pathway is involved in cancer?

Columnar epithelial cells from the colonic mucosa are studied to identify abnormalities in cell signaling pathways. Abnormal epithelial cells from colonic adenocarcinoma are shown to have a mutation ...
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1answer
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Classify chemotherapy drugs?

I'm studying a TCGA dataset trying to find correlations between gene expression and clinical data which might shed light on some pathways. One column of the clinical data provides a list of ...
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2answers
312 views

Are all mutagens carcinogens?

Not all carcinogens are mutagens. Alcohol and estrogen, for example, do not damage DNA. It's one of the assumptions of the Ames test that mutagenicity implies carcinogenicity, but is this always the ...
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1answer
424 views

What are garlic's effects on DHT?

Most antiandrogens inhibit DHT. DHT is connected to testosterone. [1] shows a beneficial effect on prostate cancer which can be caused by DHT. However, according to [2] garlic also increases ...
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2answers
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Cancer cure statistics questions

I have a question about cancer cure statistics. Many of the cancer literature or databases I have come across speak about 5 year or 10 year survival rates. In this case survival means that the patient ...