3
votes
2answers
55 views

Cancer growth and cell division [closed]

I am confused about the prerequisites for cell division and cancer. Which of the following is necessary for the cell cycle to progress? Hormones Growth factor Cyclins Cyclin dependent kinases ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

How is the growth of benign tumors suppressed?

A benign tumor has an outer layer of cancerous cells beyond which are regular cells (I Think). The Tumor must have some kind of boundary layer like a wall where somehow the cancerous cells can't ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

Are cell lines potentially dangerous?

More specifically, if a human subject was exposed to, say, a human cancerous cell line (via intravenous injection or through an open wound, for example), is it possible that they would develop any ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Smoking, cancer, correlation between quitting smoking and increased immediate risk

There is "proof" out there today that suggests smoking is directly linked to cancer. I cannot argue against that, for the evidence in favor appears strong, and the evidence against is lacking. I'll ...
2
votes
2answers
53 views

Connection between genes and pathways

I am reading about a paper about inferencing pathway information in cancer cells. Authors refer to ERBB2 as a gene and a pathway. I don't have solid biology background. What exactly means when we ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

What is a phospho-protein binding domain?

Is this just a domain that binds proteins that have been phosphorylated? And it mediates signalling between an activated/phosphorylated protein? How is this significant with BRCA1?
1
vote
2answers
56 views

The role of antibodies interacting with cancer

I'm learning about antibodies. As I understand it, antibodies detect stranger cells/bacterial/viruses by the molecules present in their membranes. In cancer cells, the cancer cell have produce some ...
6
votes
1answer
286 views

How similar are Circulating Tumor Cells and Cancer Stem Cells?

Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) are linked with metastasis and their presence can be used to indicate the onset of metastatic cancer. Likewise, the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) hypothesis suggests that ...
8
votes
1answer
434 views

Do larger multicellular organisms have an increased risk of mutation and thus cancer?

So I was thinking that if each cell has P(X) of becoming cancerous, then the chance of cancer is 1-((1-P(X))^n) where n is the number of cells in the organism. Since larger organisms have more cells ...