A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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6
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4answers
273 views

Why do we think chronic inflammation can cause cancer?

Why do we think chronic inflammation can cause cancer? I know the pathway is not fully understood, but what makes scientists believe that inflammation causes cancer?
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0answers
7 views

Cell Lines in Cancer Biology [closed]

Where could I find information regarding cell lines such as A549, MDA-MB 468, MCF-7, Hela etc. with respect to their origin, usage, mechanism of action, specific receptors, advantages and ...
-1
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0answers
14 views

Has S.aureus ever been used against cancer?

Treating inoperable tumors with bacteria appears to be very effective, albeit being toxic to the patient as well. Has (live attenuated) Staphylococcus aureus ever been used against cancer? If the ...
0
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0answers
21 views

What the gene variation detection result can tell us about a cancer [duplicate]

We do a research on a particular cancer, now we have a result of the gene variation detection . What next steps do we need to do? we don't have a clear picture about this. Can you give us some ...
1
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2answers
56 views

How to predict the effect of a non coding SNP variant on the expressed protein?

I am writing a paper for non coding SNPs on patients with metastatic breast cancer. Having used a specific gene panel (NGS) of approximately 60 genes, I'm currently running out of ideas on what to ...
0
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0answers
20 views

Can anyone help me find some information on cytotoxic activities of lymphoma cells

It is known that lymphoma cells express various cytotoxic molecules, such as granzymes and perforin. However, I cannot find any papers concerning the cytotoxic activity of lymphoma cells, rather than ...
4
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1answer
62 views

Why does fever above 102 herald a cancer patient's death?

I was recently intrigued by the observation of a longtime hospice nurse that her cancer patients die a different death than her Alzheimer's or multiple sclerosis or heart failure or COPD patients. ...
1
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1answer
57 views

Why RTK Truncations So Common in Transformations

So if we can understand that RTKs are 'floating' around the surface of a cell as monomers until ligand binds one of the monomers and thereby acts as a bridge to facilitate binding to a corresponding ...
0
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1answer
21 views

Measuring tumor heterogeneity [closed]

I would like to ask if there's any method (established or not) in order to quantify heterogeneity found in mutations occuring in primary neoplasms and metastatic lesions (either common or private) and ...
0
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0answers
25 views

Can lymphoma cells perform the functions that normal lymphocytes do?

It is known that lymphoma cells are derived from lymphocytes such as T cells, B cells, and even natural killer cells (arguably). Can these lymphoma cells attack microbes, viruses, or secrete ...
1
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2answers
426 views

Can you Transfer Cancer Between People via Saliva or other Bodily Fluids?

This may sound like a strange question. But could a Cancerous cell be transferred from one person to another from Oral contact e.g. Through Saliva, or other exchange of bodily fluids? I know that ...
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0answers
29 views

How to construct tumor phylogenetic tree?

I would like to know if anyone has tried any software that constructs tumor evolution trees where the trunks represent the common mutations and the private alterations are noted on each branch. I can ...
0
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0answers
17 views

Tumor cell image database

Could anyone recommend a database of circulating cancer cells (CTC) images? I am working on an algorithm to distinguish them from red blood cells.
5
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0answers
76 views

Can bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells be destroyed by resonance?

Radiotherapy has been used to treat cancer. Can the resonances by coordinated electromagnetic waves (and/or other forms of waves), of various frequencies, amplitudes and pulse rates, directed from ...
0
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0answers
17 views

TCGA Array Data Interpretation - why is PTEN up when I know it shouldn't be in RCC?

I am trying to make some sense of the KIRC (clear cell renal cell carcinoma) gene expression microarray data (level 3). I am a little bit confused by the expression levels of PTEN which are elevated ...
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0answers
77 views

Does cancer cells come from same process as evolution? [duplicate]

Here is how I understand it: DNA replication is not 100% perfect and error can happen, this error can be good(evolution) or bad(cancer properties). But its not the only source of cancer cells - DNA ...
2
votes
2answers
91 views

Why mutations in genes involved in general processes like DNA repair increase the risk of developing specific types of cancer?

For example, mutation in MHS2, which encodes a protein involved in the repair of mismatches that occur during DNA replication, dramatically increases the risk of developing colon cancer. (There are ...
-4
votes
1answer
56 views

Why do we have oncogenes? [closed]

Oncogene is a gene which in certain circumstances can transform a cell into a tumour cell. Everything we have has reason and meaning. Or there was some use in past. What's the reason for we have ...
14
votes
3answers
361 views

In a tumor, why hypoxic regions have access to glucose?

The Warburg effect is ubiquitous in cancer. It consists of the upregulation of glucose uptake, glycolysis, and subsequent lactate secretion, sometimes by over 200 times, in cancer cells as compared to ...
1
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0answers
27 views

How accurate are proteomic-based biomarkers of cancer? [closed]

Currently protein expression is one of the widely used biomarker types. For example, any $i^{th}$ protein could be a selected biomarker. How can a minute change in single protein concentration ...
4
votes
1answer
37 views

How do CD 8+ Tc cells reach the site of tumors?

In normal humoral immunity, dendritic cells present antigens to the Th cells by arriving at the Lymph node. This is fine. But consider a tumor cell. How does the Tc cell sitting in the lymph node know ...
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0answers
15 views

The properties of benign tumours

Do benign tumours have no functioning apoptosis mechanisms ? If so what stops benign tumours from excessive growth? Also can a benign tumour have a functioning apoptosis mechanism?
1
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0answers
44 views

On ways to treat cancer [closed]

If an area that has tumours is affected by some non-lethal disease would it kill the cancer cells first since the tumour cells are more 'unstable' ? Could this non-lethal disease 'process' be ...
1
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0answers
8 views

Pathogenesis of Cardiac Atypia?

I am studying the pathogenesis of atypia in cardiac cells where the etiology is most commonly irritation or infection and where the precancerous risk depends on the context of diagnosis. This fact ...
2
votes
1answer
32 views

Why is mRNA used as a biomarker for cancer over tRNA or rRNA?

I cannot find a clear explanation for why mRNA is used as cancer biomarker and not tRNA or rRNA. Is there something peculiar about mRNA which cannot be fulfilled by tRNA or rRNA?
3
votes
1answer
142 views

Why are cancer rates low in large animals?

Large animals generally have more cells and live longer than smaller animals. For example, bowhead whales live up to 200 years and weigh up to 100 tonnes, as opposed to humans (living ~71 years and ...
3
votes
1answer
98 views

Most human-like teratoma ever recorded?

I'm curious to learn about the 'most human' teratoma ever recorded. By that I mean a teratoma which most resembles the form of a human being. I suppose there are several factors which would ...
2
votes
1answer
38 views

Is there some research paper which focus on the influence of using cancer cell as experimental materials on experimental result? [closed]

Cancer cell is unstable cell and high variation, but there are many experiment use cancer cell as experimental materials. I always wonder how much influence can using cancer cell as experimental ...
2
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0answers
29 views

Why lactate inhibits growth (or enhances death rate)?

Extracellular lactate tends to inhibit cellular growth or enhance cell death. This happens in the vicinity of tumors and in cell cultures. See for example this reference: Ozturk, Sadettin S., Mark ...
4
votes
0answers
90 views

Escaping resource limitations during tumor evolution

In their discussion of the importance of r- and K-selection on tumors, Aktipis et al. (2013; figure 3) provide the following illustration of a hypothetical cancer growth curve: In it, you can see ...
2
votes
1answer
25 views

Where does the lactate produced by tumors go?

Tumors are known to burn glucose and secrete lactate (this is known as the Warburg effect). Where does this lactate go? Does it steadily accumulate in the neighborhood of the tumor? This doesn't ...
1
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1answer
43 views

Whales and cancer [duplicate]

Do whales get less cancer than they should considering they have a lot more cells and tissue? If a lot of cancer formation is random because of mutations then shouldn't whales receive a lot of ...
2
votes
2answers
77 views

At what cancer stage do tumors release circulating tumor cells into the blood?

And would a very accurate sensitive system for detecting circulating tumor cells (which detects 1 cell per 50 billion) be useful as a screening tool ?
7
votes
1answer
584 views

Can cancer cells in the same person, organ, and origin have different DNA?

Is it possible for cells from the same tumor to have different genetic material, and if so, to what degree is it possible (how fast do they mutate) ?
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2answers
35 views

Do antioxidants interfere with chemotherapy?

Since most of the chemotherapy drugs kill cancer cells by damaging their DNAs by means of free radicals. So antioxidants, which will detoxify free radicals, should theoretically decrease the efficacy ...
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0answers
22 views

Probabilities of gene amplification: four questions [closed]

Do mutations in the SLC1A5 gene affect tumor proliferation? Are SLC1A5 mutations in tumors dominant, recessive, or neutral? Amplification vs mutation vs overexpression: please explain the ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

What are the determinants of tumor metastasis

Under what conditions do tumors migrate? Is it due to hostile microenvironment conditions, drug application, mutations, or other causes? Are there any migration probability values (I am doing an in ...
1
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1answer
26 views

Numbers in the names of tumor markers

In tumor markers such as CA 125, CA 19-9 and many other, CA stands for Carcinoma antigen, but what about the number?
0
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0answers
53 views

Where do I find microsatellite instability annotation for TCGA data

I have searched through the TCGA data portal but I was unable to find MSI annotation for TCGA Colon Adenocarcinoma (COAD) and Rectum Adenocarcinoma (READ) datasets. I am searching for the annotation ...
7
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0answers
269 views

Contact Inhibition of Cell Division: Signaling Pathway

The following article refers to contact inhibition of cell division in epithelial cells, specifically MDCK cells: Collective and single cell behavior in epithelial contact inhibition. In their review ...
4
votes
1answer
80 views

Normal cells and the immune system [closed]

Normal or healthy cells have a natural ability to avoid being attacked by the immune system. So if a cancer cell has all inherited 'strategies' for avoiding the immune system (that are from their ...
0
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0answers
24 views

Can Allergy and Auto-immune diseases be the signs of hyper-vigilant immune system?

Allergy sufferers are much less likely to get some types of cancers. Theories regarding allergy - cancer link are mixed. Many say it is due to hyper-sensitive immune response. But the correlation ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Is it possible to have cancer and normal blood count at the same time? [closed]

Does cancer always cause abnormal full blood count? I've read on the internet that some people who had advanced cancer, also had normal blood count. I can't find anything on the internet about this ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

Cancer cells and their ability to avoid the immune system

Since cancer cell retain their ability to trigger the immune system from their pre-cancerous state and any condition that causes an auto-immune reaction in a specific area of the body will attack any ...
0
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0answers
56 views

Why do leukemia and lymphoma cause “night sweats”?

One of the symptoms of these blood cancers is sleep hyperhidrosis (aka night sweats). Also referred to as one of the B-symptoms, it may be used for prognosis. What is the the mechanism behind the ...
0
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0answers
25 views

Immunotherapy for tumours which do not have TSA

Is immunotherapy possible for tumours which do not have Tumour Specific Antigens (TSA)? If so, doesn't targeting those tumour cells also target other healthy cells, thus causing autoimmunity ?
0
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1answer
138 views

Cancer in myogenic heart cells? [duplicate]

Why cancer does not occur in myogenic heart cells? Is there any special ability in heart cells to resist cancer ?
1
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1answer
56 views

Genomic instability of cancer cells in h&e image

Is there are any books or papers on the topic of visual differences(analyzing H&E microscopy) of high grade cancer cells vs low grade cancer cells vs non-cancer cells? In particular, I am trying ...
5
votes
2answers
173 views

Where can I find mutation datasets for cancer?

My lab has been using TCGA data (somatic mutations and clinical data) to develop panels of genes and of mutations we expect to see in certain cancer populations. We'd like to validate our panels by ...
4
votes
2answers
66 views

Where can I find histograms and tables of prevalence of mutations in cancer?

At some point in the past I found a cancer portal site which had aggregated data for the relationships between various mutations and their prevalence in cancer types and tumor data. The data was ...