A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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Cancer cure statistics questions

I have a question about cancer cure statistics. Many of the cancer literature or databases I have come across speak about 5 year or 10 year survival rates. In this case survival means that the patient ...
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How to make sure a stem cell culture is cancer free?

Say I take a blood sample from an adult, extract the white cells and apply to them the process described in <this article>. Assuming this actually turns the adult white cells into stem cells, which ...
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Regarding apoptosis and inhibitors

If there is an apoptosis shut-off mechanism of any kind, one could call it a null-apoptosis mechanism. If this is possible, could there be a null-apoptosis inhibitor? Something that inhibits an ...
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which signalling pathway is involved in cancer?

Columnar epithelial cells from the colonic mucosa are studied to identify abnormalities in cell signaling pathways. Abnormal epithelial cells from colonic adenocarcinoma are shown to have a mutation ...
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Classify chemotherapy drugs?

I'm studying a TCGA dataset trying to find correlations between gene expression and clinical data which might shed light on some pathways. One column of the clinical data provides a list of ...
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Are all mutagens carcinogens?

Not all carcinogens are mutagens. Alcohol and estrogen, for example, do not damage DNA. It's one of the assumptions of the Ames test that mutagenicity implies carcinogenicity, but is this always the ...
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Carcinogens, how do they work?

The easiest carcinogenic thing for me to grasp is radiation, as it directly messes with DNA. Then it seems there are other compounds that simply mimic hormones, but these shouldn't necessarily cause ...
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189 views

What are garlic's effects on DHT?

Most antiandrogens inhibit DHT. DHT is connected to testosterone. [1] shows a beneficial effect on prostate cancer which can be caused by DHT. However, according to [2] garlic also increases ...
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48 views

What does “tumour budding” mean?

tumour budding, lymphocytic infiltration and resection margins are established factors that influence the outcome of colorectal cancer (1) In this context what does "tumour budding" mean? Reference ...
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Cancer growth and cell division [closed]

I am confused about the prerequisites for cell division and cancer. Which of the following is necessary for the cell cycle to progress? Hormones Growth factor Cyclins Cyclin dependent kinases ...
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Can plants get cancer?

I can't think of any reason why plants wouldn't be able to get cancer, but I've never heard of a plant growing a tumor. I've also never seen a plant with a noticeable abnormal growth. Can plants get ...
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57 views

What is a phospho-protein binding domain?

Is this just a domain that binds proteins that have been phosphorylated? And it mediates signalling between an activated/phosphorylated protein? How is this significant with BRCA1?
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TCGA gene expression data are missing matched normal

I'm trying to use the TCGA data portal to get gene expression data for cancer tissues, but I'm not sure what "Tumor matched normal" means. It is unclear to me if the values are already compared to a ...
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3answers
123 views

Why cancer mutations do accumulate sequentially?

According to Knudson hypothesis, cancer mutations accumulate in order. Statistics says, that cancer probability increases as sixth order of age, which may mean six consequential steps to cancer. But, ...
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Evolutionary rationale behind migration proteins

Tumor cells are able to migrate due to specific migration proteins. What is their evolutionary origin? Or are they simply deregulated?
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About the Heart and cancer [duplicate]

I read cancerous growth in the heart is rare . Why is that? Cancer cells are very unstable yet can function somehow. Could the Heart's intense pulses of electromagnetic energy make it alot harder for ...
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1answer
25 views

Is it firmly established, that mutations are sufficient for cancer?

It is evident for scientists, that all cancer cells have some mutated genes. Say mutations in general. But this evidence means necessary condition. But what about sufficient conditions? Is it ...
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30 views

How is the growth of benign tumors suppressed?

A benign tumor has an outer layer of cancerous cells beyond which are regular cells (I Think). The Tumor must have some kind of boundary layer like a wall where somehow the cancerous cells can't ...
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Can oncogenesis happen without apoptosis pathway being affected?

Has there ever been incidences of one or more cancerous cells having all it's cell-death pathways and apoptosis mechanisms intact and functional?
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Regarding cancer cells and RFA

Are cancer cells destabilized if near a strong electromagnetic field over a long period of time? I read this technique of using radio-frequency ablation and heat shock to kill cancer cells. I don't ...
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42 views

About stem cells and Cancer

Do stem cells have an apoptosis mechanism and , if they do could this be used to repair the cell self-destruction pathways in a cancer cell?
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Could the Warburg effect be used to starve cancer cells in situ?

What is wrong with the following chain of reasoning? Nearly all cancer cells rely on high rates of glucose uptake (upto 200 times more than normal cells). This is known as the the Warburg effect. ...
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Do cell walls prevent cancer?

To my knowledge plants do not have an uncontrolled growth disease similar to cancer. Is the function by which they avoid uncontrolled growth related to their cell wall and preventing damage to ...
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Are cell lines potentially dangerous?

More specifically, if a human subject was exposed to, say, a human cancerous cell line (via intravenous injection or through an open wound, for example), is it possible that they would develop any ...
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In what ways can mechanisms of apoptosis be damaged?

How many ways can an Apoptosis mechanism be made disfunctional or irreparably damaged? If a cell has damaged Apoptosis mechanisms and it divides will its daughter cells have such damage?
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Concerning Apoptosis

What if cellular growth and repair is 'forced' to occur repeatedly in a region where it wouldn't normally happen , if the biological area was 'healthier'. Could this more aggressive cellular growth ...
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Do cancer cells give off specific chemical signatures?

Do cancer cells give off specific chemical signatures? Are these signatures different from normal cells?
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If a gene altered causes cancer and creates a protein for cancer can the new protein be isolated in some way?

In the above title question, can the protein thats altered not be isolated (to separate out from other proteins) somehow? Is there nothing that can bind to the specific cancer proteins that will not ...
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63 views

Epithelial cells and Rhinovirus

If you injected a tumor with epithelial cells infected with the Rhinovirus, would this still evoke an immune response as it would with the respiratory system? Secondly, what is the specific reason the ...
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125 views

Is solving cancer required in order to avoid aging?

When the telomerase enzyme is not active the telomere shortens every time the cell duplicates leading to a reproductive limit (Hayflicks limit). On one hand this is a believed reason for aging. On the ...
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Functioning of BRCA2

I know that BRCA2 interacts with RAD51 to repair DNA damage. But how exactly does it function ? What are the other proteins that interact with it ?
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Respiratory protections against various pollutants

Obviously it's better than nothing, I live in a city, less polluted than the leaders like Hanoï, Shangai, etc.., but strangely, I already expressed it on this site, I have a sort of disproportionate ...
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Is there a standard reference for the importance of tumor heterogeneity?

In a recent post, Philip Gerlee highlighted the two biggest contributions of mathematical oncology to cancer research: (1) increasing focus on the progress of cancer as an evolutionary process, and ...
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60 views

Can cancer be an immune system disorder? [closed]

Can cancer result from a weakened immune system? Would this mean that cancer could be considered an immune system disorder?
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Why do doctors do chemo or transplantation for cancers that don't respond well to these treatments? [closed]

From the UpToDate article on multiple myeloma: In most people, chemotherapy partially controls multiple myeloma; rarely, chemotherapy leads to complete remission. Also: Transplantation, ...
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Why do most breast cancers occur in women?

According to Korde et al. (2010): Male breast cancer accounts for less than 1% of all cancers in men and less than 1% of breast cancers. This raises the question: Why do most breast cancers ...
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2answers
49 views

Smoking, cancer, correlation between quitting smoking and increased immediate risk

There is "proof" out there today that suggests smoking is directly linked to cancer. I cannot argue against that, for the evidence in favor appears strong, and the evidence against is lacking. I'll ...
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0answers
39 views

Best way to automatically link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol in TCGA

I am trying to figure out how to link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol, for TCGA dataset. So far, I have found this ftp directory with Gene info updated daily. But, for Entrez ID 728661, I have found ...
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Is the Andraka pancreatic cancer test real?

In the wikipedia article about Andraka's pancreatic cancer test there are some controversial statements. On one hand there are many glorious words about the method, also some awards, also some ...
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25 views

At what cancer stage do tumors release circulating tumor cells into the blood?

And would a very accurate sensitive system for detecting circulating tumor cells (which detects 1 cell per 50 billion) be useful as a screening tool ?
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2answers
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Detecting cancer or a genetic predisposition based on DNA sequencing

I am not by any means a biologist - so go easy. What would be a method for determining whether or not a patient has cancer based only on a genomic sequence? Update Thanks for the help in revising ...
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2answers
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Connection between genes and pathways

I am reading about a paper about inferencing pathway information in cancer cells. Authors refer to ERBB2 as a gene and a pathway. I don't have solid biology background. What exactly means when we ...
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1answer
52 views

Where can I find histograms and tables of prevalence of mutations in cancer?

At some point in the past I found a cancer portal site which had aggregated data for the relationships between various mutations and their prevalence in cancer types and tumor data. The data was ...
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1answer
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Different level of toxicity between smoke

Has there been studies on the difference between the smoke generated from: cigarette or cigar manufactured by brands which are proven to contain more than a hundred of dangerous additional ...
4
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1answer
70 views

Transcriptionally-mediated DNA damage

I'm researching the genetics of brain cancer, and finding a huge number of mutations in voltage-gated channels. It stands to reason that some of this DNA damage is due to the DNA being transcribed ...
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How does Acetaldehyde accelerate mitosis?

I read that one of the ways alcohol is carcinogenic is via accelerated mitosis due to acetaldehyde, I was wondering what pathway caused this acceleration?
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101 views

Why are haploid cancer cells not killed by immune system?

I have seen haploid cancer cells (I think it was leukemia cells) in a lab. Sperms and eggs are haploid but are not destroyed by the body because they are protected by other cells surrounding them. ...
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114 views

How can synonymous mutations lead to cancerous or tumorous phenotypes?

After analyzing DNA sequences of an oncogene from many human cancer patients, you found that synonymous substitutions occur in a specific codon of this oncogene. Assuming that these synonymous ...
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1answer
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Extremely rare occurence of Heart cancer?

The occurrence of Heart cancer (similar, but not the same as Rhabdomyosarcoma) is extremely rare, about 1 per year according to MayoClinic. The reason for this rarity is explained to be the ...
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Can cancer cells in the same person, organ, and origin have different DNA?

Is it possible for cells from the same tumor to have different genetic material, and if so, to what degree is it possible (how fast do they mutate) ?