A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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Normal cells and the immune system [closed]

Normal or healthy cells have a natural ability to avoid being attacked by the immune system. So if a cancer cell has all inherited 'strategies' for avoiding the immune system (that are from their ...
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Can Allergy and Auto-immune diseases be the signs of hyper-vigilant immune system?

Allergy sufferers are much less likely to get some types of cancers. Theories regarding allergy - cancer link are mixed. Many say it is due to hyper-sensitive immune response. But the correlation ...
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1answer
59 views

Is it possible to have cancer and normal blood count at the same time? [closed]

Does cancer always cause abnormal full blood count? I've read on the internet that some people who had advanced cancer, also had normal blood count. I can't find anything on the internet about this ...
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54 views

Cancer cells and their ability to avoid the immune system

Since cancer cell retain their ability to trigger the immune system from their pre-cancerous state and any condition that causes an auto-immune reaction in a specific area of the body will attack any ...
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0answers
88 views

Why do leukemia and lymphoma cause “night sweats”?

One of the symptoms of these blood cancers is sleep hyperhidrosis (aka night sweats). Also referred to as one of the B-symptoms, it may be used for prognosis. What is the the mechanism behind the ...
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25 views

Immunotherapy for tumours which do not have TSA

Is immunotherapy possible for tumours which do not have Tumour Specific Antigens (TSA)? If so, doesn't targeting those tumour cells also target other healthy cells, thus causing autoimmunity ?
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1answer
140 views

Cancer in myogenic heart cells? [duplicate]

Why cancer does not occur in myogenic heart cells? Is there any special ability in heart cells to resist cancer ?
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58 views

Genomic instability of cancer cells in h&e image

Is there are any books or papers on the topic of visual differences(analyzing H&E microscopy) of high grade cancer cells vs low grade cancer cells vs non-cancer cells? In particular, I am trying ...
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2answers
192 views

Where can I find mutation datasets for cancer?

My lab has been using TCGA data (somatic mutations and clinical data) to develop panels of genes and of mutations we expect to see in certain cancer populations. We'd like to validate our panels by ...
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2answers
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Where can I find histograms and tables of prevalence of mutations in cancer?

At some point in the past I found a cancer portal site which had aggregated data for the relationships between various mutations and their prevalence in cancer types and tumor data. The data was ...
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2answers
107 views

Energy metabolism in Cancer cells

The TCA cycle intermediate Isocitrate dehydrogenase commonly undergoes point mutations in cancers. This allows IDH to reduce a-Ketogluterate to 2Hydoxygluterate, causing a reduction in pVHLs ability ...
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833 views

Why should a tumor look like a crab?

Origin of the word "cancer" The disease was first called cancer by Greek physician Hippocrates (460-370 BC). He is considered the “Father of Medicine”. Hippocrates used the terms carcinos and ...
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335 views

GATK workflow for Cancer

I am just starting to learn to use bioinformatics tools. My university has a limited and expensive bioinformatics team, so I'm mostly on my own except for big questions. I am planning to use GATK to ...
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Where can I find DNA Sequence data for colon cancer

I am a computer scientist studying pattern recognition, and I am hoping to do some supervised learning on colon cancer. Unfortunately, I'm having a heck of a time finding DNA data in the following ...
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1answer
44 views

Why is Bcl2 a good target for cancer therapy?

Bcl2 is a family of proteins that are involved in the inhibition of apoptosis in cells. My question is that what makes this anti-apoptotic protein useful in cancer therapies as opposed to focusing on ...
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2answers
40 views

How is curcumin effective in fighting cancer?

Can you explain the mechanisms of how curcumin affects cancer cells and how effective it is? More reading: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25667441 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1208/s12248-...
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1answer
52 views

Natural Killer Cell and Cancer

NK cells are very effective in destroying circulating cancer cells before their extravasation into the organ, However they have only a minimal inhibiting effect on already established micrometastases. ...
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3answers
237 views

Can/Have cancer cells be/been used in stem cell culture lines?

Since Cancer cells have unlimited growth potential, can they be induced towards totipotency and pluripotency? If so, can cancer cells be used in stem cell culture because of similar properties of ...
3
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2answers
124 views

Question about proto-oncogenes and oncogenes?

My textbook says: Growth-promoting genes are called proto-oncogenes. Some can be changed into oncogenes by a point mutation that alters the ability of the proto-oncogene to be switched off. They ...
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3answers
77 views

Cancer a method for early Earth Evolution? [duplicate]

Something I have been wondering for a while is looking at cancer from an evolutionary standpoint. It's easy to conclude (from observations today) that cancer is something we would rather avoid. ...
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What will happen if an anaplastic/cancer cell is used in cloning?

Since anaplastic cells have high glycolytic ratio and replicative potential, if they are used as the somatic cell in a model of cloning(like dolly's mother's udder cell), what is likely to happen?
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1answer
113 views

What's the difference between tumor cells and host cells? [closed]

When you talk about cancer, is there a difference between tumor cells and host cells ? What is the role of immune cells ? in a nutshell ?
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1answer
200 views

What does it mean when a patient suffering from malignant tumor (cancer) has been declared cured?

Comment by Anongoodnurse, has made me curious as to what a doctor means when (s)he says "The cancer is cured" to a patient. My idea up till this point (based on what I read and what I learned in my ...
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1answer
77 views

Can radiation therapy cause cancer?

Radiation therapy is a very popular cancer treatment method. But can it have any risk for make a different cancer? Because i think that radiation exposure can make DNA mutation and thus increase the ...
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Can a cell completely lose the ability to undergo apoptosis?

What I mean is - can a super-cancer cell completely lose the ability to kill itself, losing all apoptosis-related mechanisms and becoming eternally resistant to any drug that tries to induce apoptosis ...
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0answers
64 views

Absorbed dose from a CT scan with relation to radiation accidents

I read somewhere that the average CTDIvol in CT scans at hospitals is ~40 mGy. This translates to the 'radiation intensity' at the center of the person, and can also be roughly interpreted as an '...
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1answer
43 views

How can rapid growth cancer get nutrients in vivo?

When I was little, before I get into biological studying, I read a news talking about cancer would be totally cured after decades. I still remember that researchers had a theory to claim if they could ...
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2answers
85 views

About stem cells and Cancer

Do stem cells have an apoptosis mechanism and , if they do could this be used to repair the cell self-destruction pathways in a cancer cell?
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Effect of cellular phone towers on human health

We live in world of mobiles, tablets, PCs and other electronic gadgets. We are continuously exposed to radio frequencies and other cellular frequencies. Generally these all waves are with very low ...
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1answer
23 views

Ways to identify that proteins are regulating different genes experimentally

As part of my study I have been given this hypothesis: HIF 1a and HIF 2a regulate different genes in multiple myeloma What ways do we have to identify that these proteins are regulating ...
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1answer
106 views

How to find a Cancer PPI network data [closed]

I need a Protein Protein Interactions network of Cancer (any type - just I want a PPI of any type cancer), I search and see DIP PPI and .... How to specify that is Cancer PPI and how to get a PPI of ...
3
votes
1answer
105 views

Difficulty in finding protein inhibition drugs

I was reading an article on a recent identification of a PARP-14 protein in cancer cells that is responsible for production of additional glucose which keeps cancer cells from dying, and that a PARP-...
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0answers
56 views

What are the sizes of the cells that make up human hair?

The question is in the title, but I'll explain why the question arose. I'm curious about the rates that various cells in the body divide, and have found various information relating to this, but ...
3
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2answers
57 views

Chemotherapy - Hair loss

Chemotherapy kills cancer cells by targeting rapidly growing cells. That is why patients are loosing hair as well. My question is, why chemo related hair loss is temporary ? The docs say it is ...
4
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2answers
56 views

Is the sun's damage to skin sufficient to warrant protection anytime the average person goes outside or just for extended periods?

According to the American Academy of Dermatology website, Everyone needs sunscreen Sunscreen should be used every day if you will be outside. The sun emits harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays year round. ...
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Best articles on Rad51/Rad52

What are the best journal articles to read on Rad51/Rad52 in the context of homologous recombination and cancer?
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1answer
47 views

Why would mutation rates increase in a tumour?

This article describes a tumour: Swanton found that even the primary tumour was surprisingly varied. He found 128 mutations among the various samples, but only a third of these were common to all ...
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228 views

If Tumors have lots of mutations in them how is it the immune system can't detect them?

If a cancerous tumor has a lot of mutations in them why can't the immune system detect them? If a person has cancer could this somehow alter the person's immune system so it doesn't function ...
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0answers
16 views

What is the best aCGH normalization procedure for hyper-ploid tumor samples?

I'm currently working on aCGH data of Triple Negative Breast Cancer patients xenografts and primary tumor samples. A substantial amount of my samples is highly aberrated which leads to offsets of the ...
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What are the differences between cancer and tumour?

What are the differences between cancer and tumour? I mean is it in the DNA or shape or something else... And how can a benign tumour turn into a malignant tumour? The body has a lot of tumours all ...
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1answer
105 views

How can electric fields inhibit tumor growth?

In MIT's Technology review it is explained that electric fields can cause dividing cancer cells to explode, while these fields have no significant impact on non-dividing tissues. The original research ...
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1answer
184 views

Are low-intensity radio-waves carcinogenic?

A recent review article, Oxidative mechanisms of biological activity of low-intensity radiofrequency radiation reached a surprising conclusion our analysis demonstrates that low-intensity RFR [...
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47 views

Endogenous PAF inhibitor in metastatic process (?)

When neoplastic cells cause a metastasis, they can create a protective coat of platelets that counterbalances immunitary response. My question is if the coat formed due to PAF can be undone by an ...
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1answer
134 views

Why does T-cell Cancer Therapy require a large tumor mutanome?

An article I read about Neuroblastoma states that the fact that Neuroblstoma has a small mutanome means that it is not viable to apply the classic T-cell immunotherapy. Why is this so? The article can ...
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3answers
708 views

Have there been studies done to test Immortality of cancer cells in culture?

This website on cultured cancer cells () says cancer cells may be immortal. I am wondering if there has been any research done to find if cancer cells are really immortal. How old is the still ...
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1answer
54 views

Why doesn't Manipulated Virus for Cancer Cure Work [closed]

I'm not a biologist but I have an idea for a cure for cancer and it is very simple and probably has flaws (if it worked it probrably wouldn't be a cure for all) or is not possible but ... I'm still ...
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1answer
122 views

What specific mutations can cause an apoptosis mechanism to malfunction?

What specific mutations can cause the apoptosis mechanisms in a cell to malfunction? Are any such mutations 'reversible' , somehow or are they generally permanent? what kind of mutations can happen ...
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Why do epithelial cells arrest in response to serum?

Primary epithelial cells, for example human mammary epithelium, fail to proliferate (arrest) in serum-containing medium. Therefore, a common growth medium for epithelium contains pituitary extract ...
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2answers
141 views

Deciding a reasonable threshold for copy number variation in a CNV (SNP array) TCGA dataset

Is there a methodology to select a reasonable threshold for copy number variation in a CNV (SNP array) TCGA dataset, to define when there is a significative alteration? Can I download CNV data for ...
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2answers
140 views

Why is cisplatin a very potent antineoplastic for testicular cancer, but not necessarily for other cancers?

Cisplatin (structure below) is a platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent which is very effective in the treatment of some cancers. Its introduction was responsible for improving the cure rate for ...