A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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Respiratory protections against various pollutants

Obviously it's better than nothing, I live in a city, less polluted than the leaders like Hanoï, Shangai, etc.., but strangely, I already expressed it on this site, I have a sort of disproportionate ...
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2answers
92 views

Is there a standard reference for the importance of tumor heterogeneity?

In a recent post, Philip Gerlee highlighted the two biggest contributions of mathematical oncology to cancer research: (1) increasing focus on the progress of cancer as an evolutionary process, and ...
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1answer
73 views

Can cancer be an immune system disorder? [closed]

Can cancer result from a weakened immune system? Would this mean that cancer could be considered an immune system disorder?
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30 views

Why do doctors do chemo or transplantation for cancers that don't respond well to these treatments? [closed]

From the UpToDate article on multiple myeloma: In most people, chemotherapy partially controls multiple myeloma; rarely, chemotherapy leads to complete remission. Also: Transplantation, ...
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59 views

Best way to automatically link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol in TCGA

I am trying to figure out how to link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol, for TCGA dataset. So far, I have found this ftp directory with Gene info updated daily. But, for Entrez ID 728661, I have found ...
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2answers
85 views

Smoking, cancer, correlation between quitting smoking and increased immediate risk

There is "proof" out there today that suggests smoking is directly linked to cancer. I cannot argue against that, for the evidence in favor appears strong, and the evidence against is lacking. I'll ...
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1answer
65 views

Is the Andraka pancreatic cancer test real?

In the wikipedia article about Andraka's pancreatic cancer test there are some controversial statements. On one hand there are many glorious words about the method, also some awards, also some ...
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2answers
56 views

Connection between genes and pathways

I am reading about a paper about inferencing pathway information in cancer cells. Authors refer to ERBB2 as a gene and a pathway. I don't have solid biology background. What exactly means when we ...
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2answers
70 views

Detecting cancer or a genetic predisposition based on DNA sequencing

I am not by any means a biologist - so go easy. What would be a method for determining whether or not a patient has cancer based only on a genomic sequence? Update Thanks for the help in revising ...
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1answer
32 views

At what cancer stage do tumors release circulating tumor cells into the blood?

And would a very accurate sensitive system for detecting circulating tumor cells (which detects 1 cell per 50 billion) be useful as a screening tool ?
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1answer
25 views

Different level of toxicity between smoke

Has there been studies on the difference between the smoke generated from: cigarette or cigar manufactured by brands which are proven to contain more than a hundred of dangerous additional ...
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1answer
100 views

Carcinogens, how do they work?

The easiest carcinogenic thing for me to grasp is radiation, as it directly messes with DNA. Then it seems there are other compounds that simply mimic hormones, but these shouldn't necessarily cause ...
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1answer
51 views

How does Acetaldehyde accelerate mitosis?

I read that one of the ways alcohol is carcinogenic is via accelerated mitosis due to acetaldehyde, I was wondering what pathway caused this acceleration?
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134 views

How can synonymous mutations lead to cancerous or tumorous phenotypes?

After analyzing DNA sequences of an oncogene from many human cancer patients, you found that synonymous substitutions occur in a specific codon of this oncogene. Assuming that these synonymous ...
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1answer
130 views

Why are haploid cancer cells not killed by immune system?

I have seen haploid cancer cells (I think it was leukemia cells) in a lab. Sperms and eggs are haploid but are not destroyed by the body because they are protected by other cells surrounding them. ...
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1answer
107 views

Can cancer cells in the same person, organ, and origin have different DNA?

Is it possible for cells from the same tumor to have different genetic material, and if so, to what degree is it possible (how fast do they mutate) ?
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1answer
75 views

What is a phospho-protein binding domain?

Is this just a domain that binds proteins that have been phosphorylated? And it mediates signalling between an activated/phosphorylated protein? How is this significant with BRCA1?
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1answer
16 views

Cancer history on environment-cancer relationship

I am interested to know how environment-cancer relationship knowledge has developed. I know that all began when Muller first proved that mutation could be induced via ionizing radiation, X rays in the ...
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2answers
133 views

Is solving cancer required in order to avoid aging?

When the telomerase enzyme is not active the telomere shortens every time the cell duplicates leading to a reproductive limit (Hayflicks limit). On one hand this is a believed reason for aging. On the ...
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2answers
124 views

How does smoking, an environmental factor, cause cancer, fundamentally a genetic disease?

If cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease, how might an environmental factor such as smoking cause cancer?
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1answer
213 views

Are there any types of cancer that cause neurons to divide?

After birth neurons generally do not divide. But is there any specific type of rare cancer or tumour where neurons divide? And if there is such a cancer, then how is it possible for a neuron to regain ...
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0answers
72 views

A number of questions regarding chemotaxis assay using PBMCs

In our lab we would like to study the chemotaxis of PBMCs towards conditioned medium obtained following treatment of cancer cells with different compounds. My questions are regarding the method of ...
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1answer
385 views

Extremely rare occurence of Heart cancer?

The occurrence of Heart cancer (similar, but not the same as Rhabdomyosarcoma) is extremely rare, about 1 per year according to MayoClinic. The reason for this rarity is explained to be the ...
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2answers
61 views

The role of antibodies interacting with cancer

I'm learning about antibodies. As I understand it, antibodies detect stranger cells/bacterial/viruses by the molecules present in their membranes. In cancer cells, the cancer cell have produce some ...
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2answers
142 views

Could cancer be in itself a evolutionary process?

Could cancer be in itself a evolutionary process? Maybe in some way could it be a process of variation? Or would this idea be completely without support, if so, why? I don't mean that each case ...
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1answer
71 views

Transcriptionally-mediated DNA damage

I'm researching the genetics of brain cancer, and finding a huge number of mutations in voltage-gated channels. It stands to reason that some of this DNA damage is due to the DNA being transcribed ...
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1answer
73 views

Are there any examples where 'magic bullet' drugs have worked in cancer treatment?

Magic bullets are drugs that can be administered on a micro local scale. In this context administration/binding would occur in or near the tumour by exploiting the different surface antigens that ...
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1answer
52 views

What does “tumour budding” mean?

tumour budding, lymphocytic infiltration and resection margins are established factors that influence the outcome of colorectal cancer (1) In this context what does "tumour budding" mean? Reference ...
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1answer
1k views

How do liver and lung metastases cause death?

Metastasis to the liver and lungs are the main causes of death in colorectal cancer.(1) I understand that colorectal cancer may have metastases. But how do these metastases cause death? Reference ...
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1answer
50 views

What does “rapamycin-sensitive oncogenic transformation” mean?

Can someone explain exactly what "rapamycin-sensitive oncogenic transformation" is? I get that it's a drug that suppresses the immune system but what does it have to do with oncogenic transformation? ...
3
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1answer
148 views

By what mechanism is Streptococcus bovis acting as a risk factor for colorectal cancer?

Streptococcus bovis bacteremia/endocarditis is considered a risk factor for colorectal cancer. What pathophysiological mechanism may link the two together?
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1answer
843 views

Why is Sanger sequencing inferior for detecting SNPs in cancer cells?

I am familiar with Sanger sequencing, but at the level of an undergraduate. A lecturer of mine tried to describe Sanger sequencing as losing the sequence information in noise when used to detect ...
4
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1answer
470 views

Breeding laboratory mice with cancer; how does this work?

It has recently been brought to my attention that live laboratory mice with specific cancer strains can be readily purchased for medical research. For example, the Jackson Laboratory sells mice with ...
2
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1answer
69 views

Why it is so difficult to treat leukemia?

I want to ask what is the reason that T315I type CML leukemia is currently untreatable. I have read quite a few papers in this subject. Why the current genetic oriented engineering drugs failed to ...
2
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1answer
123 views

EGFR, sialylation, and cancer progression

EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) has been intensively studied in cancer and treatments have been developed to inhibit EGFR signaling. Sialylation of EGFR is known to block dimerization and ...
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1answer
32 views

How Common are Paraneoplastic Syndromes in Cancer Patients?

I recall reading around one in four cancer patients will suffer a paraneoplastic syndrome during the course of their illness but I can't find where I read this and I can't find any reliable sources to ...
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2answers
72 views

What is a “tool strain”?

When a biologist is talking about a genetically engineered mouse strain which is a "tool strain", what does that mean? What is the exact definition of a tool strain? What is the difference between a ...
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3answers
287 views

Can plants get cancer?

I can't think of any reason why plants wouldn't be able to get cancer, but I've never heard of a plant growing a tumor. I've also never seen a plant with a noticeable abnormal growth. Can plants get ...
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1answer
433 views

How does Topoisomerase II inhibition affect cancer cells?

Topoisomerase II poisons represent some of the most important and widely prescribed anticancer drugs currently in clinical use. These drugs encompass a diverse group of natural and synthetic ...
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2answers
42 views

Studying changes in DNA for causes of cancer

First of all let me say that I'm not into Biology myself... but I have a question for those of you who are. From what I've read, cancer is caused by 'faulty' DNA that behaves abnormally. Mutations ...
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1answer
26 views

Do Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitors Selectively induce Apoptosis in Cancer cells without inducing the same in healthy human cells?

Do Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) Inhibitors (e.g. cerulenin) selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells without inducing the same in healthy human cells?
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4answers
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Can a tumor produce something not currently found in our own bodies?

While speaking with my co-workers, the topic of tumors growing things came up. The examples were (and backed by images) of tumors growing a tooth, hair, and sometimes even more complex objects such ...
6
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1answer
80 views

What are the biological mechanisms behind the increase in cancer risk and alcohol consumption?

Alcohol consumption is known to be a risk factor for developing cancer. Compared to obvious causes like tobacco where one is exposed to known carcinogens, I don't see an obvious mechanism by which ...
2
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1answer
31 views

What range of dose should be used?

This is a dose-response experiment testing a new cancer drug. the darker line represents cancer cells. what range of dose should be used? I think it's 2-4 because this affects cancer cells only. is ...
4
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1answer
173 views

Why do we think chronic inflammation can cause cancer?

Why do we think chronic inflammation can cause cancer? I know the pathway is not fully understood, but what makes scientists believe that inflammation causes cancer?
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1answer
360 views

How can the Ames test detect a human carcinogen?

Using the Ames test, we add a mutagen to auxotrophic salmonella with mutations in the histidine pathway and rat liver extract to simulate metabolism. How would we know if the carcinogen is a human ...
9
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1answer
251 views

Can cancer grow forever if supplied with unlimited resources?

If somehow a human could give a tumor unlimited resources, would the cancer grow forever? It seems like it would until it gets so large that it physically affects vital organs. Is what would likely ...
2
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1answer
97 views

Which cells will pass cancer to offspring?

Each of these types below contains a DNA mutation. Which type(s) will affect the children of the individual whose cell it is. Red blood cell T cell Skin (epithelial) cell Neuron from the brain Sperm ...
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2answers
201 views

Why do most breast cancers occur in women?

According to Korde et al. (2010): Male breast cancer accounts for less than 1% of all cancers in men and less than 1% of breast cancers. This raises the question: Why do most breast cancers ...
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1answer
81 views

What causes mutations in regulatory genes? [closed]

In detail, what causes mutations in regulatory genes?