A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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Do metastatic cells still have their parent's identity?

If a liver cancer, for example, gives metastases. Will metastatic cells still have liver identity? I mean, if we mark liver cells, will we see the cancer cells too? Thanks a lot!
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1answer
28 views

Classify chemotherapy drugs?

I'm studying a TCGA dataset trying to find correlations between gene expression and clinical data which might shed light on some pathways. One column of the clinical data provides a list of ...
2
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1answer
68 views

Why it is so difficult to treat leukemia?

I want to ask what is the reason that T315I type CML leukemia is currently untreatable. I have read quite a few papers in this subject. Why the current genetic oriented engineering drugs failed to ...
2
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1answer
119 views

EGFR, sialylation, and cancer progression

EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) has been intensively studied in cancer and treatments have been developed to inhibit EGFR signaling. Sialylation of EGFR is known to block dimerization and ...
2
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1answer
31 views

What range of dose should be used?

This is a dose-response experiment testing a new cancer drug. the darker line represents cancer cells. what range of dose should be used? I think it's 2-4 because this affects cancer cells only. is ...
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1answer
84 views

Are cell lines potentially dangerous?

More specifically, if a human subject was exposed to, say, a human cancerous cell line (via intravenous injection or through an open wound, for example), is it possible that they would develop any ...
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1answer
28 views

Evolutionary rationale behind migration proteins

Tumor cells are able to migrate due to specific migration proteins. What is their evolutionary origin? Or are they simply deregulated?
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19 views

Regarding cellular self-destruction

I heard and read telomere 'health' or 'length' ( if that's right ) has alot to do with cell 'health'. If telomere 'abilities' are 'restored' to a 'healthier' status then the cell it is in functions as ...
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21 views

Subtypes of Acute myeloid leukemia

I am a computer scientist with no biological background and working on analyzing lab results of patients with Acute myeloid leukemia. They have been tagged with following subtypes of AML: AML with ...
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69 views

A number of questions regarding chemotaxis assay using PBMCs

In our lab we would like to study the chemotaxis of PBMCs towards conditioned medium obtained following treatment of cancer cells with different compounds. My questions are regarding the method of ...
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2answers
80 views

Cancer cure statistics questions

I have a question about cancer cure statistics. Many of the cancer literature or databases I have come across speak about 5 year or 10 year survival rates. In this case survival means that the patient ...
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2answers
71 views

Epithelial cells and Rhinovirus

If you injected a tumor with epithelial cells infected with the Rhinovirus, would this still evoke an immune response as it would with the respiratory system? Secondly, what is the specific reason the ...
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1answer
47 views

Do cell walls prevent cancer?

To my knowledge plants do not have an uncontrolled growth disease similar to cancer. Is the function by which they avoid uncontrolled growth related to their cell wall and preventing damage to ...
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2answers
364 views

TCGA gene expression data are missing matched normal

I'm trying to use the TCGA data portal to get gene expression data for cancer tissues, but I'm not sure what "Tumor matched normal" means. It is unclear to me if the values are already compared to a ...
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2answers
61 views

The role of antibodies interacting with cancer

I'm learning about antibodies. As I understand it, antibodies detect stranger cells/bacterial/viruses by the molecules present in their membranes. In cancer cells, the cancer cell have produce some ...
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1answer
348 views

How can the Ames test detect a human carcinogen?

Using the Ames test, we add a mutagen to auxotrophic salmonella with mutations in the histidine pathway and rat liver extract to simulate metabolism. How would we know if the carcinogen is a human ...
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2answers
66 views

In what ways can mechanisms of apoptosis be damaged?

How many ways can an Apoptosis mechanism be made disfunctional or irreparably damaged? If a cell has damaged Apoptosis mechanisms and it divides will its daughter cells have such damage?
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24 views

Concerning Apoptosis

What if cellular growth and repair is 'forced' to occur repeatedly in a region where it wouldn't normally happen , if the biological area was 'healthier'. Could this more aggressive cellular growth ...
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1answer
95 views

Carcinogens, how do they work?

The easiest carcinogenic thing for me to grasp is radiation, as it directly messes with DNA. Then it seems there are other compounds that simply mimic hormones, but these shouldn't necessarily cause ...
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1answer
52 views

What does “tumour budding” mean?

tumour budding, lymphocytic infiltration and resection margins are established factors that influence the outcome of colorectal cancer (1) In this context what does "tumour budding" mean? Reference ...
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1answer
321 views

What are garlic's effects on DHT?

Most antiandrogens inhibit DHT. DHT is connected to testosterone. [1] shows a beneficial effect on prostate cancer which can be caused by DHT. However, according to [2] garlic also increases ...
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1answer
31 views

Is it firmly established, that mutations are sufficient for cancer?

It is evident for scientists, that all cancer cells have some mutated genes. Say mutations in general. But this evidence means necessary condition. But what about sufficient conditions? Is it ...
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1answer
26 views

Regarding cancer cells and radio-frequency ablation

Are cancer cells destabilized if near a strong electromagnetic field over a long period of time? I read this technique of using radio-frequency ablation and heat shock to kill cancer cells. I don't ...
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1answer
45 views

About stem cells and Cancer

Do stem cells have an apoptosis mechanism and , if they do could this be used to repair the cell self-destruction pathways in a cancer cell?
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1answer
49 views

Could the Warburg effect be used to starve cancer cells in situ?

What is wrong with the following chain of reasoning? Nearly all cancer cells rely on high rates of glucose uptake (upto 200 times more than normal cells). This is known as the the Warburg effect. ...
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1answer
64 views

Is the Andraka pancreatic cancer test real?

In the wikipedia article about Andraka's pancreatic cancer test there are some controversial statements. On one hand there are many glorious words about the method, also some awards, also some ...
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1answer
28 views

At what cancer stage do tumors release circulating tumor cells into the blood?

And would a very accurate sensitive system for detecting circulating tumor cells (which detects 1 cell per 50 billion) be useful as a screening tool ?
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1answer
122 views

Why are haploid cancer cells not killed by immune system?

I have seen haploid cancer cells (I think it was leukemia cells) in a lab. Sperms and eggs are haploid but are not destroyed by the body because they are protected by other cells surrounding them. ...
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1answer
71 views

What is a phospho-protein binding domain?

Is this just a domain that binds proteins that have been phosphorylated? And it mediates signalling between an activated/phosphorylated protein? How is this significant with BRCA1?
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1answer
16 views

Cancer history on environment-cancer relationship

I am interested to know how environment-cancer relationship knowledge has developed. I know that all began when Muller first proved that mutation could be induced via ionizing radiation, X rays in the ...
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1answer
26 views

Do Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitors Selectively induce Apoptosis in Cancer cells without inducing the same in healthy human cells?

Do Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) Inhibitors (e.g. cerulenin) selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells without inducing the same in healthy human cells?
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1answer
17 views

Regarding the apoptosis mechanisms in cells and cancer

If all the cells in a cancerous tumour had there apoptosis mechanisms 'turned back on' or reactivated or repaired by some 'yet to be discovered' process would this cause the tumour to 'self destruct' ...
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0answers
16 views

Tumour resistance: single-cell or population effect?

Drug resistance can arise through a number of mechanisms. For instance, EGFR mutation when treating with EGFR inhibitors, or compensatory activation of alternative survival pathways. But does it occur ...
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28 views

Cells with no apoptosis mechanism and their 'byproducts'

If a culture or sample of cells is such they all have no apoptosis mechanisms yet they have not been at present determined to be cancerous ; given such a cell culture is there a way to determine by ...
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0answers
22 views

Regarding benign tumors and what 'stops' them

Benign tumors can grow to dangerous size yet are they capable of metastisizing ; if not what stops this? Also with a benign tumor if you call its cells 'near' its edges its tumor 'cell wall' I was ...
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1answer
30 views

About excessive cellular growth

When there is 'excessive' cell growth 'ordered' by the human body in some specific part of the body that is not part of the usual repairing mechanisms, does this cause extra telomere 'shortening' or ...
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0answers
22 views

Segregation Analysis for predicting age-specific cancer risk

I am relatively new to the world of genetics research and have been tasked with presenting to my lab the potential value of a paper that uses Complex Segregation Analysis for a risk analysis. The hope ...
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1answer
32 views

If a gene altered causes cancer and creates a protein for cancer can the new protein be isolated in some way?

In the above title question, can the protein thats altered not be isolated (to separate out from other proteins) somehow? Is there nothing that can bind to the specific cancer proteins that will not ...
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0answers
54 views

Best way to automatically link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol in TCGA

I am trying to figure out how to link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol, for TCGA dataset. So far, I have found this ftp directory with Gene info updated daily. But, for Entrez ID 728661, I have found ...
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0answers
58 views

Are there any examples where 'magic bullet' drugs have worked?

Magic bullets are drugs that can be administered on a micro local scale near the tumour by exploiting the different surface antigens that cancers expose. The drug attaches via an mAb (attached to the ...
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2answers
135 views

Does scratched Teflon coated frying pans contain carcinogens which can cause cancer? [closed]

Is it true that using scratched Teflon-coated pans contain carcinogens, and if so, can they be consumed through the food cooked in them? E.g. The deadly toxins from non-stick frying pans
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1answer
131 views

How can synonymous mutations lead to cancerous or tumorous phenotypes?

After analyzing DNA sequences of an oncogene from many human cancer patients, you found that synonymous substitutions occur in a specific codon of this oncogene. Assuming that these synonymous ...
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1answer
25 views

Could transfusion of a different blood type cure blood-based cancers?

Different antigen detection triggers an immune system response that could perhaps stimulate mitochondria and such in killing cancer cells - something like chemo without the hair-loss?
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1answer
39 views

Regarding apoptosis and turning it 'back on'

Is there some chemical or chemicals or even special molecules that can be 'injected' into cancer cells that will turn any Apoptosis mechanisms 'back on'? Or maybe chemicals and/or molecules that ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Why do doctors do chemo or transplantation for cancers that don't respond well to these treatments? [closed]

From the UpToDate article on multiple myeloma: In most people, chemotherapy partially controls multiple myeloma; rarely, chemotherapy leads to complete remission. Also: Transplantation, ...
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2answers
82 views

Smoking, cancer, correlation between quitting smoking and increased immediate risk

There is "proof" out there today that suggests smoking is directly linked to cancer. I cannot argue against that, for the evidence in favor appears strong, and the evidence against is lacking. I'll ...
0
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2answers
71 views

What is a “tool strain”?

When a biologist is talking about a genetically engineered mouse strain which is a "tool strain", what does that mean? What is the exact definition of a tool strain? What is the difference between a ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Different level of toxicity between smoke

Has there been studies on the difference between the smoke generated from: cigarette or cigar manufactured by brands which are proven to contain more than a hundred of dangerous additional ...
0
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1answer
44 views

How does Acetaldehyde accelerate mitosis?

I read that one of the ways alcohol is carcinogenic is via accelerated mitosis due to acetaldehyde, I was wondering what pathway caused this acceleration?
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1answer
32 views

How Common are Paraneoplastic Syndromes in Cancer Patients?

I recall reading around one in four cancer patients will suffer a paraneoplastic syndrome during the course of their illness but I can't find where I read this and I can't find any reliable sources to ...