A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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which signalling pathway is involved in cancer?

Columnar epithelial cells from the colonic mucosa are studied to identify abnormalities in cell signaling pathways. Abnormal epithelial cells from colonic adenocarcinoma are shown to have a mutation ...
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Is the sun's damage to skin sufficient to warrant protection anytime the average person goes outside or just for extended periods?

According to the American Academy of Dermatology website, Everyone needs sunscreen Sunscreen should be used every day if you will be outside. The sun emits harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays year round. ...
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108 views

How can electric fields inhibit tumor growth?

In MIT's Technology review it is explained that electric fields can cause dividing cancer cells to explode, while these fields have no significant impact on non-dividing tissues. The original research ...
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114 views

Classify chemotherapy drugs?

I'm studying a TCGA dataset trying to find correlations between gene expression and clinical data which might shed light on some pathways. One column of the clinical data provides a list of ...
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76 views

Transcriptionally-mediated DNA damage

I'm researching the genetics of brain cancer, and finding a huge number of mutations in voltage-gated channels. It stands to reason that some of this DNA damage is due to the DNA being transcribed ...
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180 views

Do cancer cells give off specific chemical signatures?

Do cancer cells give off specific chemical signatures? Are these signatures different from normal cells?
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Is there a standard reference for the importance of tumor heterogeneity?

In a recent post, Philip Gerlee highlighted the two biggest contributions of mathematical oncology to cancer research: (1) increasing focus on the progress of cancer as an evolutionary process, and (2)...
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39 views

How do CD 8+ Tc cells reach the site of tumors?

In normal humoral immunity, dendritic cells present antigens to the Th cells by arriving at the Lymph node. This is fine. But consider a tumor cell. How does the Tc cell sitting in the lymph node know ...
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Escaping resource limitations during tumor evolution

In their discussion of the importance of r- and K-selection on tumors, Aktipis et al. (2013; figure 3) provide the following illustration of a hypothetical cancer growth curve: In it, you can see ...
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Y Chromosome in Ovary Cancer Data

I have been analyzing TCGA Ovary Cancer data. In Somatic Mutation data, there is data of mutations in all the chromosomes (1-22 and X), but amazingly, I have found one (just one) row of Y Chromosome ...
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238 views

Can/Have cancer cells be/been used in stem cell culture lines?

Since Cancer cells have unlimited growth potential, can they be induced towards totipotency and pluripotency? If so, can cancer cells be used in stem cell culture because of similar properties of ...
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151 views

Why are cancer rates low in large animals?

Large animals generally have more cells and live longer than smaller animals. For example, bowhead whales live up to 200 years and weigh up to 100 tonnes, as opposed to humans (living ~71 years and ...
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132 views

Question about proto-oncogenes and oncogenes?

My textbook says: Growth-promoting genes are called proto-oncogenes. Some can be changed into oncogenes by a point mutation that alters the ability of the proto-oncogene to be switched off. They ...
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About sharks and how they find fish

Other than olfactory senses do sharks use some kind of sense that uses electromagnetic waves? Is this similar to an electric eel? I saw a book with the cover statement 'Sharks never get cancer'. IS ...
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Doxorubicin's intercalant and topoisomerase inhibition in leukemia?

I am thinking the role of doxorubicin's pathways in cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma: topoisomerase inhibitor and inhibit DNA activity intercalant - intercalant DNA bases and inhibit DNA ...
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129 views

What type of flask should I use to culture NTERA2 embryonic cancer stem cells?

I'm just starting my MSc research and I am in the process of making a list of equipments/consumables to order. Is there a specific flask in which I can culture NTERA2 (NTERA2/D1) cell line?
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203 views

Cancer growth and cell division [closed]

I am confused about the prerequisites for cell division and cancer. Which of the following is necessary for the cell cycle to progress? Hormones Growth factor Cyclins Cyclin dependent kinases ...
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102 views

Most human-like teratoma ever recorded?

I'm curious to learn about the 'most human' teratoma ever recorded. By that I mean a teratoma which most resembles the form of a human being. I suppose there are several factors which would ...
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59 views

How do cancers eventually lead to death / other debilitating symptoms? [closed]

With regards to people I know or have read about who live with cancer, most of their symptoms are results of chemotherapy, surgical interventions, etc., which have the goal of eradicating the cancer. ...
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395 views

Can radiation equilevant to 1 CT (computer tomography) scan causes significant changes in human body?

I've read that CT scan causes radiation equivalent to few hundreds of ordinary X ray scan. It sound scary at the first look of it but I wonder is it the amount considered significant? Can dosage equal ...
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Regarding apoptosis and inhibitors

If there is an apoptosis shut-off mechanism of any kind, one could call it a null-apoptosis mechanism. If this is possible, could there be a null-apoptosis inhibitor? Something that inhibits an ...
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301 views

How does smoking, an environmental factor, cause cancer, fundamentally a genetic disease?

If cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease, how might an environmental factor such as smoking cause cancer?
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67 views

What does “rapamycin-sensitive oncogenic transformation” mean?

Can someone explain exactly what "rapamycin-sensitive oncogenic transformation" is? I get that it's a drug that suppresses the immune system but what does it have to do with oncogenic transformation? ...
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Why would mutation rates increase in a tumour?

This article describes a tumour: Swanton found that even the primary tumour was surprisingly varied. He found 128 mutations among the various samples, but only a third of these were common to all ...
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Can bioluminescence be used for cancer or tumor detection? [closed]

What diagnostic applications, if any, are there in using bioluminescence to detect cancer or tumors (in vivo)?
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Energy metabolism in Cancer cells

The TCA cycle intermediate Isocitrate dehydrogenase commonly undergoes point mutations in cancers. This allows IDH to reduce a-Ketogluterate to 2Hydoxygluterate, causing a reduction in pVHLs ability ...
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How do liver and lung metastases cause death?

Metastasis to the liver and lungs are the main causes of death in colorectal cancer.(1) I understand that colorectal cancer may have metastases. But how do these metastases cause death? Reference (1)...
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Do both TSG and Proto-oncogenes have to suffer mutations to cause cancer?

I'm having a conceptual nightmare trying to understand when a group of cells may become cancerous and the more resources I consult the more confused I seem to get. In order for a cell to become ...
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Difficulty in finding protein inhibition drugs

I was reading an article on a recent identification of a PARP-14 protein in cancer cells that is responsible for production of additional glucose which keeps cancer cells from dying, and that a PARP-...
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Deciding a reasonable threshold for copy number variation in a CNV (SNP array) TCGA dataset

Is there a methodology to select a reasonable threshold for copy number variation in a CNV (SNP array) TCGA dataset, to define when there is a significative alteration? Can I download CNV data for ...
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42 views

How to make sure a stem cell culture is cancer free?

Say I take a blood sample from an adult, extract the white cells and apply to them the process described in <this article>. Assuming this actually turns the adult white cells into stem cells, which ...
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How is the growth of benign tumors suppressed?

A benign tumor has an outer layer of cancerous cells beyond which are regular cells (I Think). The Tumor must have some kind of boundary layer like a wall where somehow the cancerous cells can't ...
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194 views

By what mechanism is Streptococcus bovis acting as a risk factor for colorectal cancer?

Streptococcus bovis bacteremia/endocarditis is considered a risk factor for colorectal cancer. What pathophysiological mechanism may link the two together?
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Natural Killer Cell and Cancer

NK cells are very effective in destroying circulating cancer cells before their extravasation into the organ, However they have only a minimal inhibiting effect on already established micrometastases. ...
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Chemotherapy - Hair loss

Chemotherapy kills cancer cells by targeting rapidly growing cells. That is why patients are loosing hair as well. My question is, why chemo related hair loss is temporary ? The docs say it is ...
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Expression/Mechanism of ROR1 in healthy tissue

ROR1 is currently under investigation as a therapeutic target for cancer (1). A number of studies show different cancers may have their metastatic potential reduced, or become apoptotic through ...
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Why is it important to study chromatin to understand cancer?

Many labs and many projects in biology institutes and university departments have been starting to study chromatin. Chromatin states, chromatin interactions, chromatin loopings, chromatin behaviours, ...
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Regarding tumors and their developement

If certain cells or tissue in a specific part of the body are for some reason overworked; like the cases of severe acid reflux damaging the throat repeatedly and the cells in the throat having to do ...
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2k views

How does electrolarynx work?

I have heard that this is an effective replacement for patients who have a dysfunctional larynx, partly due to cancer. I am curious to know the inner working of this device and why such a robotic ...
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What are the sizes of the cells that make up human hair?

The question is in the title, but I'll explain why the question arose. I'm curious about the rates that various cells in the body divide, and have found various information relating to this, but ...
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333 views

What are multicell spheroids?

I'm from a maths background and I'm doing some research on mathematical models of cancer. I've come across alot of literature mentioning "multicell spheroids" in the context of avascular tumours. I ...
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Why mutations in genes involved in general processes like DNA repair increase the risk of developing specific types of cancer?

For example, mutation in MHS2, which encodes a protein involved in the repair of mismatches that occur during DNA replication, dramatically increases the risk of developing colon cancer. (There are ...
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121 views

Regarding cancer cells and telomeres

If cancer cells have telomeres are they different than the telomeres in non-cancerous cells? Would cancer cell telomeres be somehow 'set-up' to function almost indefinitely; in other words are 'they' ...
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723 views

Why cancer mutations do accumulate sequentially?

According to Knudson hypothesis, cancer mutations accumulate in order. Statistics says, that cancer probability increases as sixth order of age, which may mean six consequential steps to cancer. But, ...
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42 views

Why is mRNA used as a biomarker for cancer over tRNA or rRNA?

I cannot find a clear explanation for why mRNA is used as cancer biomarker and not tRNA or rRNA. Is there something peculiar about mRNA which cannot be fulfilled by tRNA or rRNA?
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366 views

GATK workflow for Cancer

I am just starting to learn to use bioinformatics tools. My university has a limited and expensive bioinformatics team, so I'm mostly on my own except for big questions. I am planning to use GATK to ...
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TCGA gene expression data are missing matched normal

I'm trying to use the TCGA data portal to get gene expression data for cancer tissues, but I'm not sure what "Tumor matched normal" means. It is unclear to me if the values are already compared to a ...
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Studying changes in DNA for causes of cancer

First of all let me say that I'm not into Biology myself... but I have a question for those of you who are. From what I've read, cancer is caused by 'faulty' DNA that behaves abnormally. Mutations ...
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133 views

Which cells will pass cancer to offspring?

Each of these types below contains a DNA mutation. Which type(s) will affect the children of the individual whose cell it is. Red blood cell T cell Skin (epithelial) cell Neuron from the brain Sperm ...
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134 views

Why does T-cell Cancer Therapy require a large tumor mutanome?

An article I read about Neuroblastoma states that the fact that Neuroblstoma has a small mutanome means that it is not viable to apply the classic T-cell immunotherapy. Why is this so? The article can ...