A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

2
votes
1answer
71 views

Why it is so difficult to treat leukemia?

I want to ask what is the reason that T315I type CML leukemia is currently untreatable. I have read quite a few papers in this subject. Why the current genetic oriented engineering drugs failed to ...
2
votes
1answer
137 views

EGFR, sialylation, and cancer progression

EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) has been intensively studied in cancer and treatments have been developed to inhibit EGFR signaling. Sialylation of EGFR is known to block dimerization and ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

How Common are Paraneoplastic Syndromes in Cancer Patients?

I recall reading around one in four cancer patients will suffer a paraneoplastic syndrome during the course of their illness but I can't find where I read this and I can't find any reliable sources to ...
0
votes
2answers
77 views

What is a “tool strain”?

When a biologist is talking about a genetically engineered mouse strain which is a "tool strain", what does that mean? What is the exact definition of a tool strain? What is the difference between a ...
13
votes
3answers
371 views

Can plants get cancer?

I can't think of any reason why plants wouldn't be able to get cancer, but I've never heard of a plant growing a tumor. I've also never seen a plant with a noticeable abnormal growth. Can plants get ...
6
votes
1answer
452 views

How does Topoisomerase II inhibition affect cancer cells?

Topoisomerase II poisons represent some of the most important and widely prescribed anticancer drugs currently in clinical use. These drugs encompass a diverse group of natural and synthetic ...
2
votes
2answers
43 views

Studying changes in DNA for causes of cancer

First of all let me say that I'm not into Biology myself... but I have a question for those of you who are. From what I've read, cancer is caused by 'faulty' DNA that behaves abnormally. Mutations ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Do Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitors Selectively induce Apoptosis in Cancer cells without inducing the same in healthy human cells?

Do Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS) Inhibitors (e.g. cerulenin) selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells without inducing the same in healthy human cells?
6
votes
4answers
131 views

Can a tumor produce something not currently found in our own bodies?

While speaking with my co-workers, the topic of tumors growing things came up. The examples were (and backed by images) of tumors growing a tooth, hair, and sometimes even more complex objects such ...
6
votes
1answer
82 views

What are the biological mechanisms behind the increase in cancer risk and alcohol consumption?

Alcohol consumption is known to be a risk factor for developing cancer. Compared to obvious causes like tobacco where one is exposed to known carcinogens, I don't see an obvious mechanism by which ...
2
votes
1answer
32 views

What range of dose should be used?

This is a dose-response experiment testing a new cancer drug. the darker line represents cancer cells. what range of dose should be used? I think it's 2-4 because this affects cancer cells only. is ...
4
votes
1answer
179 views

Why do we think chronic inflammation can cause cancer?

Why do we think chronic inflammation can cause cancer? I know the pathway is not fully understood, but what makes scientists believe that inflammation causes cancer?
1
vote
1answer
392 views

How can the Ames test detect a human carcinogen?

Using the Ames test, we add a mutagen to auxotrophic salmonella with mutations in the histidine pathway and rat liver extract to simulate metabolism. How would we know if the carcinogen is a human ...
9
votes
1answer
269 views

Can cancer grow forever if supplied with unlimited resources?

If somehow a human could give a tumor unlimited resources, would the cancer grow forever? It seems like it would until it gets so large that it physically affects vital organs. Is what would likely ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

Which cells will pass cancer to offspring?

Each of these types below contains a DNA mutation. Which type(s) will affect the children of the individual whose cell it is. Red blood cell T cell Skin (epithelial) cell Neuron from the brain Sperm ...
12
votes
2answers
206 views

Why do most breast cancers occur in women?

According to Korde et al. (2010): Male breast cancer accounts for less than 1% of all cancers in men and less than 1% of breast cancers. This raises the question: Why do most breast cancers ...
-2
votes
1answer
85 views

What causes mutations in regulatory genes? [closed]

In detail, what causes mutations in regulatory genes?
3
votes
2answers
170 views

In cancer, why do cells duplicate themselves?

In regards to cancer why do cells replicate themselves? If it's a mutation, what kind of mutation would this be classified as?
5
votes
5answers
333 views

What is the lowest common denominator of cancer?

What is the lowest level attribute that all cancers share? Also, what is the highest level attributes that all cancers share?
4
votes
1answer
54 views

Where can I find histograms and tables of prevalence of mutations in cancer?

At some point in the past I found a cancer portal site which had aggregated data for the relationships between various mutations and their prevalence in cancer types and tumor data. The data was ...
3
votes
2answers
210 views

Do both TSG and Proto-oncogenes have to suffer mutations to cause cancer?

I'm having a conceptual nightmare trying to understand when a group of cells may become cancerous and the more resources I consult the more confused I seem to get. In order for a cell to become ...
6
votes
1answer
337 views

How similar are Circulating Tumor Cells and Cancer Stem Cells?

Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) are linked with metastasis and their presence can be used to indicate the onset of metastatic cancer. Likewise, the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) hypothesis suggests that ...
8
votes
1answer
95 views

Why doesn't yearly screening for lung cancer decrease mortality rates?

In a large trial, screening yearly for lung cancer hasn't reduced mortality rates. Why is this? Isn't cancer best treatable when caught early? Is this because lung cancer is hard to treat anyway, ...
5
votes
3answers
155 views

Robotic surgery for treating cancer?

We can localise cancer cells in the body. We can manufacture materials thin and hard enough to penetrate the body without harming it. So what stops us from creating an automated surgery where the ...
10
votes
1answer
608 views

Do larger multicellular organisms have an increased risk of mutation and thus cancer?

So I was thinking that if each cell has P(X) of becoming cancerous, then the chance of cancer is 1-((1-P(X))^n) where n is the number of cells in the organism. Since larger organisms have more cells ...
13
votes
1answer
374 views

Looking for a cancer drug target database to guide sequencing of patient tumor DNA

I have a question I would like to pose to the community. I have recently received access to a bench-top ion torrent DNA sequencer. Our idea is to use this machine to sequence the DNA from patient’s ...
9
votes
1answer
107 views

What is the base cancer rate for an arbitrary carcinogen?

Are all carcinogens equally potent? Is the relationship between dose and probability of cancer roughly equal, or are there some carcinogens that provoke cancer significantly more than their cousins?