A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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Why RTK Truncations So Common in Transformations

So if we can understand that RTKs are 'floating' around the surface of a cell as monomers until ligand binds one of the monomers and thereby acts as a bridge to facilitate binding to a corresponding ...
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Where does the lactate produced by tumors go?

Tumors are known to burn glucose and secrete lactate (this is known as the Warburg effect). Where does this lactate go? Does it steadily accumulate in the neighborhood of the tumor? This doesn't ...
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Whales and cancer [duplicate]

Do whales get less cancer than they should considering they have a lot more cells and tissue? If a lot of cancer formation is random because of mutations then shouldn't whales receive a lot of ...
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75 views

At what cancer stage do tumors release circulating tumor cells into the blood?

And would a very accurate sensitive system for detecting circulating tumor cells (which detects 1 cell per 50 billion) be useful as a screening tool ?
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In a tumor, why hypoxic regions have access to glucose?

The Warburg effect is ubiquitous in cancer. It consists of the upregulation of glucose uptake, glycolysis, and subsequent lactate secretion, sometimes by over 200 times, in cancer cells as compared to ...
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126 views

Why are cancer rates low in large animals?

Large animals generally have more cells and live longer than smaller animals. For example, bowhead whales live up to 200 years and weigh up to 100 tonnes, as opposed to humans (living ~71 years and ...
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On ways to treat cancer [closed]

Since cancer cells are a lot more uncontrollable and mutated than 'regular' non-cancerous cells ( they are more susceptible to heat for instance); if an area that has tumours is affected by some ...
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366 views

Can cancer cells in the same person, organ, and origin have different DNA?

Is it possible for cells from the same tumor to have different genetic material, and if so, to what degree is it possible (how fast do they mutate) ?
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Do antioxidants interfere with chemotherapy?

Since most of the chemotherapy drugs kill cancer cells by damaging their DNAs by means of free radicals. So antioxidants, which will detoxify free radicals, should theoretically decrease the efficacy ...
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Probabilities of gene amplification: four questions [closed]

Do mutations in the SLC1A5 gene affect tumor proliferation? Are SLC1A5 mutations in tumors dominant, recessive, or neutral? Amplification vs mutation vs overexpression: please explain the ...
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22 views

What are the determinants of tumor metastasis

Under what conditions do tumors migrate? Is it due to hostile microenvironment conditions, drug application, mutations, or other causes? Are there any migration probability values (I am doing an in ...
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Numbers in the names of tumor markers

In tumor markers such as CA 125, CA 19-9 and many other, CA stands for Carcinoma antigen, but what about the number?
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Where do I find microsatellite instability annotation for TCGA data

I have searched through the TCGA data portal but I was unable to find MSI annotation for TCGA Colon Adenocarcinoma (COAD) and Rectum Adenocarcinoma (READ) datasets. I am searching for the annotation ...
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231 views

Contact Inhibition of Cell Division: Signaling Pathway

The following article refers to contact inhibition of cell division in epithelial cells, specifically MDCK cells: Collective and single cell behavior in epithelial contact inhibition. In their review ...
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77 views

Normal cells and the immune system [closed]

Normal or healthy cells have a natural ability to avoid being attacked by the immune system. So if a cancer cell has all inherited 'strategies' for avoiding the immune system (that are from their ...
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Can Allergy and Auto-immune diseases be the signs of hyper-vigilant immune system?

Allergy sufferers are much less likely to get some types of cancers. Theories regarding allergy - cancer link are mixed. Many say it is due to hyper-sensitive immune response. But the correlation ...
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1answer
44 views

Is it possible to have cancer and normal blood count at the same time? [closed]

Does cancer always cause abnormal full blood count? I've read on the internet that some people who had advanced cancer, also had normal blood count. I can't find anything on the internet about this ...
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45 views

Cancer cells and their ability to avoid the immune system

Since cancer cell retain their ability to trigger the immune system from their pre-cancerous state and any condition that causes an auto-immune reaction in a specific area of the body will attack any ...
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0answers
31 views

Why do leukemia and lymphoma cause “night sweats”?

One of the symptoms of these blood cancers is sleep hyperhidrosis (aka night sweats). Also referred to as one of the B-symptoms, it may be used for prognosis. What is the the mechanism behind the ...
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2answers
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Why mutations in genes involved in general processes like DNA repair increase the risk of developing specific types of cancer?

For example, mutation in MHS2, which encodes a protein involved in the repair of mismatches that occur during DNA replication, dramatically increases the risk of developing colon cancer. (There are ...
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25 views

Immunotherapy for tumours which do not have TSA

Is immunotherapy possible for tumours which do not have Tumour Specific Antigens (TSA)? If so, doesn't targeting those tumour cells also target other healthy cells, thus causing autoimmunity ?
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125 views

Cancer in myogenic heart cells? [duplicate]

Why cancer does not occur in myogenic heart cells? Is there any special ability in heart cells to resist cancer ?
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49 views

Genomic instability of cancer cells in h&e image

Is there are any books or papers on the topic of visual differences(analyzing H&E microscopy) of high grade cancer cells vs low grade cancer cells vs non-cancer cells? In particular, I am trying ...
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2answers
152 views

Where can I find mutation datasets for cancer?

My lab has been using TCGA data (somatic mutations and clinical data) to develop panels of genes and of mutations we expect to see in certain cancer populations. We'd like to validate our panels by ...
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2answers
64 views

Where can I find histograms and tables of prevalence of mutations in cancer?

At some point in the past I found a cancer portal site which had aggregated data for the relationships between various mutations and their prevalence in cancer types and tumor data. The data was ...
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Energy metabolism in Cancer cells

The TCA cycle intermediate Isocitrate dehydrogenase commonly undergoes point mutations in cancers. This allows IDH to reduce a-Ketogluterate to 2Hydoxygluterate, causing a reduction in pVHLs ability ...
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Why should a tumor look like a crab?

Origin of the word "cancer" The disease was first called cancer by Greek physician Hippocrates (460-370 BC). He is considered the “Father of Medicine”. Hippocrates used the terms carcinos and ...
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166 views

GATK workflow for Cancer

I am just starting to learn to use bioinformatics tools. My university has a limited and expensive bioinformatics team, so I'm mostly on my own except for big questions. I am planning to use GATK to ...
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Where can I find DNA Sequence data for colon cancer

I am a computer scientist studying pattern recognition, and I am hoping to do some supervised learning on colon cancer. Unfortunately, I'm having a heck of a time finding DNA data in the following ...
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3answers
259 views

Why do we think chronic inflammation can cause cancer?

Why do we think chronic inflammation can cause cancer? I know the pathway is not fully understood, but what makes scientists believe that inflammation causes cancer?
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Why is Bcl2 a good target for cancer therapy?

Bcl2 is a family of proteins that are involved in the inhibition of apoptosis in cells. My question is that what makes this anti-apoptotic protein useful in cancer therapies as opposed to focusing on ...
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2answers
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How is curcumin effective in fighting cancer?

Can you explain the mechanisms of how curcumin affects cancer cells and how effective it is? More reading: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25667441 ...
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1answer
45 views

Natural Killer Cell and Cancer

NK cells are very effective in destroying circulating cancer cells before their extravasation into the organ, However they have only a minimal inhibiting effect on already established micrometastases. ...
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3answers
222 views

Can/Have cancer cells be/been used in stem cell culture lines?

Since Cancer cells have unlimited growth potential, can they be induced towards totipotency and pluripotency? If so, can cancer cells be used in stem cell culture because of similar properties of ...
3
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2answers
71 views

Question about proto-oncogenes and oncogenes?

My textbook says: Growth-promoting genes are called proto-oncogenes. Some can be changed into oncogenes by a point mutation that alters the ability of the proto-oncogene to be switched off. They ...
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3answers
63 views

Cancer a method for early Earth Evolution? [duplicate]

Something I have been wondering for a while is looking at cancer from an evolutionary standpoint. It's easy to conclude (from observations today) that cancer is something we would rather avoid. ...
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What will happen if an anaplastic/cancer cell is used in cloning?

Since anaplastic cells have high glycolytic ratio and replicative potential, if they are used as the somatic cell in a model of cloning(like dolly's mother's udder cell), what is likely to happen?
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63 views

What's the difference between tumor cells and host cells? [closed]

When you talk about cancer, is there a difference between tumor cells and host cells ? What is the role of immune cells ? in a nutshell ?
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162 views

What does it mean when a patient suffering from malignant tumor (cancer) has been declared cured?

Comment by Anongoodnurse, has made me curious as to what a doctor means when (s)he says "The cancer is cured" to a patient. My idea up till this point (based on what I read and what I learned in my ...
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62 views

Can radiation therapy cause cancer?

Radiation therapy is a very popular cancer treatment method. But can it have any risk for make a different cancer? Because i think that radiation exposure can make DNA mutation and thus increase the ...
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Can a cell completely lose the ability to undergo apoptosis?

What I mean is - can a super-cancer cell completely lose the ability to kill itself, losing all apoptosis-related mechanisms and becoming eternally resistant to any drug that tries to induce apoptosis ...
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58 views

Absorbed dose from a CT scan with relation to radiation accidents

I read somewhere that the average CTDIvol in CT scans at hospitals is ~40 mGy. This translates to the 'radiation intensity' at the center of the person, and can also be roughly interpreted as an ...
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1answer
36 views

How can rapid growth cancer get nutrients in vivo?

When I was little, before I get into biological studying, I read a news talking about cancer would be totally cured after decades. I still remember that researchers had a theory to claim if they could ...
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2answers
80 views

About stem cells and Cancer

Do stem cells have an apoptosis mechanism and , if they do could this be used to repair the cell self-destruction pathways in a cancer cell?
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Effect of cellular phone towers on human health

We live in world of mobiles, tablets, PCs and other electronic gadgets. We are continuously exposed to radio frequencies and other cellular frequencies. Generally these all waves are with very low ...
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1answer
21 views

Ways to identify that proteins are regulating different genes experimentally

As part of my study I have been given this hypothesis: HIF 1a and HIF 2a regulate different genes in multiple myeloma What ways do we have to identify that these proteins are regulating ...
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1answer
61 views

How to find a Cancer PPI network data [closed]

I need a Protein Protein Interactions network of Cancer (any type - just I want a PPI of any type cancer), I search and see DIP PPI and .... How to specify that is Cancer PPI and how to get a PPI of ...
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1answer
61 views

Difficulty in finding protein inhibition drugs

I was reading an article on a recent identification of a PARP-14 protein in cancer cells that is responsible for production of additional glucose which keeps cancer cells from dying, and that a ...
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0answers
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What are the sizes of the cells that make up human hair?

The question is in the title, but I'll explain why the question arose. I'm curious about the rates that various cells in the body divide, and have found various information relating to this, but ...
3
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2answers
38 views

Chemotherapy - Hair loss

Chemotherapy kills cancer cells by targeting rapidly growing cells. That is why patients are loosing hair as well. My question is, why chemo related hair loss is temporary ? The docs say it is ...