A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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How to predict the effect of a non coding SNP variant on the expressed protein?

I am writing a paper for non coding SNPs on patients with metastatic breast cancer. Having used a specific gene panel (NGS) of approximately 60 genes, I'm currently running out of ideas on what to ...
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1answer
57 views

Why RTK Truncations So Common in Transformations

So if we can understand that RTKs are 'floating' around the surface of a cell as monomers until ligand binds one of the monomers and thereby acts as a bridge to facilitate binding to a corresponding ...
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269 views

Contact Inhibition of Cell Division: Signaling Pathway

The following article refers to contact inhibition of cell division in epithelial cells, specifically MDCK cells: Collective and single cell behavior in epithelial contact inhibition. In their review ...
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0answers
76 views

Can bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells be destroyed by resonance?

Radiotherapy has been used to treat cancer. Can the resonances by coordinated electromagnetic waves (and/or other forms of waves), of various frequencies, amplitudes and pulse rates, directed from ...
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0answers
90 views

Escaping resource limitations during tumor evolution

In their discussion of the importance of r- and K-selection on tumors, Aktipis et al. (2013; figure 3) provide the following illustration of a hypothetical cancer growth curve: In it, you can see ...
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0answers
52 views

What are the sizes of the cells that make up human hair?

The question is in the title, but I'll explain why the question arose. I'm curious about the rates that various cells in the body divide, and have found various information relating to this, but ...
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0answers
52 views

Y Chromosome in Ovary Cancer Data

I have been analyzing TCGA Ovary Cancer data. In Somatic Mutation data, there is data of mutations in all the chromosomes (1-22 and X), but amazingly, I have found one (just one) row of Y Chromosome ...
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0answers
29 views

Why lactate inhibits growth (or enhances death rate)?

Extracellular lactate tends to inhibit cellular growth or enhance cell death. This happens in the vicinity of tumors and in cell cultures. See for example this reference: Ozturk, Sadettin S., Mark ...
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35 views

Subtypes of Acute myeloid leukemia

I am a computer scientist with no biological background and working on analyzing lab results of patients with Acute myeloid leukemia. They have been tagged with following subtypes of AML: AML with ...
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0answers
203 views

Best way to automatically link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol in TCGA

I am trying to figure out how to link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol, for TCGA dataset. So far, I have found this ftp directory with Gene info updated daily. But, for Entrez ID 728661, I have found ...
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0answers
98 views

A number of questions regarding chemotaxis assay using PBMCs

In our lab we would like to study the chemotaxis of PBMCs towards conditioned medium obtained following treatment of cancer cells with different compounds. My questions are regarding the method of ...
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0answers
29 views

How to construct tumor phylogenetic tree?

I would like to know if anyone has tried any software that constructs tumor evolution trees where the trunks represent the common mutations and the private alterations are noted on each branch. I can ...
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0answers
15 views

The properties of benign tumours

Do benign tumours have no functioning apoptosis mechanisms ? If so what stops benign tumours from excessive growth? Also can a benign tumour have a functioning apoptosis mechanism?
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8 views

Pathogenesis of Cardiac Atypia?

I am studying the pathogenesis of atypia in cardiac cells where the etiology is most commonly irritation or infection and where the precancerous risk depends on the context of diagnosis. This fact ...
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0answers
49 views

Can a cell completely lose the ability to undergo apoptosis?

What I mean is - can a super-cancer cell completely lose the ability to kill itself, losing all apoptosis-related mechanisms and becoming eternally resistant to any drug that tries to induce apoptosis ...
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0answers
63 views

Absorbed dose from a CT scan with relation to radiation accidents

I read somewhere that the average CTDIvol in CT scans at hospitals is ~40 mGy. This translates to the 'radiation intensity' at the center of the person, and can also be roughly interpreted as an ...
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0answers
31 views

Can photosyntetic cells be genetically modified to grow at a faster rate?

I hope the question is not silly, but I wonder if a sort of genetically modified plant "cancer" could be used for carbon sequestration. For example, cancer cells like HeLa have been reproduced in ...
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0answers
41 views

Superpatients for Cancer resistance

I was reading an article on MIT Technology review about superpatients for low cholesterol that got me thinking whether such patients exist for cancer. The article is ...
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0answers
52 views

Cigarette consumption dose-response function WRT health outcomes

I'm curious how health risks (mortality, lifetime probability of cancer, etc) change with cigarette consumption. Specifically, treatring cigarette consumption like a continuous variable, rather than ...
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0answers
20 views

Tumour resistance: single-cell or population effect?

Drug resistance can arise through a number of mechanisms. For instance, EGFR mutation when treating with EGFR inhibitors, or compensatory activation of alternative survival pathways. But does it occur ...
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0answers
47 views

Cells with no apoptosis mechanism and their 'byproducts'

If a culture or sample of cells is such they all have no apoptosis mechanisms yet they have not been at present determined to be cancerous ; given such a cell culture is there a way to determine by ...
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0answers
55 views

Regarding benign tumors and what 'stops' them

Benign tumors can grow to dangerous size yet are they capable of metastisizing ; if not what stops this? Also with a benign tumor if you call its cells 'near' its edges its tumor 'cell wall' I was ...
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20 views

Can anyone help me find some information on cytotoxic activities of lymphoma cells

It is known that lymphoma cells express various cytotoxic molecules, such as granzymes and perforin. However, I cannot find any papers concerning the cytotoxic activity of lymphoma cells, rather than ...
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0answers
25 views

Can lymphoma cells perform the functions that normal lymphocytes do?

It is known that lymphoma cells are derived from lymphocytes such as T cells, B cells, and even natural killer cells (arguably). Can these lymphoma cells attack microbes, viruses, or secrete ...
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0answers
17 views

Tumor cell image database

Could anyone recommend a database of circulating cancer cells (CTC) images? I am working on an algorithm to distinguish them from red blood cells.
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0answers
17 views

TCGA Array Data Interpretation - why is PTEN up when I know it shouldn't be in RCC?

I am trying to make some sense of the KIRC (clear cell renal cell carcinoma) gene expression microarray data (level 3). I am a little bit confused by the expression levels of PTEN which are elevated ...
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0answers
25 views

What are the determinants of tumor metastasis

Under what conditions do tumors migrate? Is it due to hostile microenvironment conditions, drug application, mutations, or other causes? Are there any migration probability values (I am doing an in ...
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0answers
53 views

Where do I find microsatellite instability annotation for TCGA data

I have searched through the TCGA data portal but I was unable to find MSI annotation for TCGA Colon Adenocarcinoma (COAD) and Rectum Adenocarcinoma (READ) datasets. I am searching for the annotation ...
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0answers
24 views

Can Allergy and Auto-immune diseases be the signs of hyper-vigilant immune system?

Allergy sufferers are much less likely to get some types of cancers. Theories regarding allergy - cancer link are mixed. Many say it is due to hyper-sensitive immune response. But the correlation ...
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0answers
57 views

Why do leukemia and lymphoma cause “night sweats”?

One of the symptoms of these blood cancers is sleep hyperhidrosis (aka night sweats). Also referred to as one of the B-symptoms, it may be used for prognosis. What is the the mechanism behind the ...
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0answers
25 views

Immunotherapy for tumours which do not have TSA

Is immunotherapy possible for tumours which do not have Tumour Specific Antigens (TSA)? If so, doesn't targeting those tumour cells also target other healthy cells, thus causing autoimmunity ?
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0answers
15 views

What will happen if an anaplastic/cancer cell is used in cloning?

Since anaplastic cells have high glycolytic ratio and replicative potential, if they are used as the somatic cell in a model of cloning(like dolly's mother's udder cell), what is likely to happen?
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27 views

Effect of cellular phone towers on human health

We live in world of mobiles, tablets, PCs and other electronic gadgets. We are continuously exposed to radio frequencies and other cellular frequencies. Generally these all waves are with very low ...
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0answers
14 views

Best articles on Rad51/Rad52

What are the best journal articles to read on Rad51/Rad52 in the context of homologous recombination and cancer?
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0answers
13 views

What is the best aCGH normalization procedure for hyper-ploid tumor samples?

I'm currently working on aCGH data of Triple Negative Breast Cancer patients xenografts and primary tumor samples. A substantial amount of my samples is highly aberrated which leads to offsets of the ...
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0answers
47 views

Endogenous PAF inhibitor in metastatic process (?)

When neoplastic cells cause a metastasis, they can create a protective coat of platelets that counterbalances immunitary response. My question is if the coat formed due to PAF can be undone by an ...
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0answers
76 views

Cell Line With DNMT3a Mutation

I am looking for a cell line (preferably hematopoietic) that has an inactivating DNMT3a mutation. I have checked the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia but of all the hematopoietic cell lines I know I ...
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0answers
14 views

Has S.aureus ever been used against cancer?

Treating inoperable tumors with bacteria appears to be very effective, albeit being toxic to the patient as well. Has (live attenuated) Staphylococcus aureus ever been used against cancer? If the ...