The study of the physiology and pathology of the heart and the cardiovascular system.

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Function of the Auricle in heart

What is the function of the auricles (conical appendages through the atria) present in the heart? Do they have any other function than increasing the volume of blood the heart can hold?
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295 views

What is the nature of action potentials in autonomic nervous system?

My conjecture is that the natures of sympathetic and parasympathetic action potentials are different. My findings propose me that sympathetic action potential is little longer lasting than ...
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57 views

Effect of Aging on SA node's sympathetic fibers

I am trying to understand the effect of aging on the sympathetic fibers of SA node. I know that aging shifts the vagal curve to left in frequency due to aging. However, I am interested if aging has ...
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776 views

In an open circulatory system, how is blood moved?

In the mollusks section, the powerpoint mentioned that gastropods and bivalves have an open circulatory system. According to the note, this means that the blood does not travel in vessels. How, then, ...
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167 views

Speed of effective lymphatic drainage?

Lymphatic drainage occurs from many portions of the body: To venous angle: head axillary lymph nodes hands abdomen legs (I think legs' drainage goes through abdomen) The speed of the lymph ...
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53 views

What are the mechanisms of disabling extrinsic control of heart?

I started this thread by thinking this question but I developed it further below What is the mechanism maintaining refractory period of pacemakers? My conjecture is that the mechanism is the ...
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42 views

Which reflex arcs work in Heart with extrasystoles?

I am researching what is triggering the extrasystoles - initial idea from this thread about Which ionic channels of Pacemakers can work in very low frequencies in extrasystole? I am interested in the ...
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36 views

Which ionic channels of Pacemakers can work in very low frequencies in extrasystole?

At frequency 0-3 Hz. Like computer processors which can work at low frequencies and controlling under- and overvoltage. Normal most significant channels are Ca2+ and K+ that are changing. However, I ...
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195 views

Is Sinus node conduction necessary for heart beating?

Assume a patient with previous cardial infaction which SA node not possible to activate action potential anymore. However, SA trying to beat unsuccessfully repeatedly waisting energy. Therefore, I ...
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61 views

Normal Frequencies in Heart

I am trying to visualise possible ranges of frequencies from different structures of heart: different valves and their possible frequencies heart sounds I - IV and their normal frequencties what can ...
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170 views

How does sepsis affect heart function?

I have intuition that sepsis with infection can cause: spastic functioning of heart during systole heart working spontaneously in snatches during systole atrial fibrillation first contraction of ...
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118 views

People say the cardiac cycle depends on blood pressure? How so?

I know what the cardiac cycle is. There are two phases diastole and systole. One is the relaxed, and the other is the contracted form of the heart. The diastole is where blood is pumped to the ...
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74 views

How do cellphones calculate heart rate?

How do cellphones calculate heart rate ? I understand that the cameras there try to count undulation in blood flow, but is the method of calculation same as that of professional SpO2 monitors ?
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28 views

Association of shorter telomeres with heart disease

From this paper Those with shorter telomeres in blood DNA had poorer survival, attributable in part to a 3.18-fold higher mortality rate from heart disease (95% CI 1(.)36-7.45, p=0.0079), and ...
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Can systemic intravascular thrombosis cause brain infarction?

I wonder if the thrombus can pass through the brain-blood barrier because I think small molecules like O2, CO2 and ethanol can pass it. Probably, in some diseases where the permeability of the barrier ...
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63 views

Which chemical and hormonal effects on heart are by metabolites? [closed]

I am thinking which hormonal and chemical effects from: catecholamines thyroxin corticosteroids sex hormones prostaglandins Ca2+ Na+ K+ can be be regarded as metabolites i.e. intermediates or ...
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60 views

What is the quality rate of intrinsic autoregulation in the heart?

Autoregulation is the maintenance of constant blood flow to an organ in spite of fluctuations in Blood pressure. It involves the relaxation of myocardium and contraction. It is local. I know that ...
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37 views

Are there any forms of heart failure where cell size decreases?

I think hypertrophy happens in most of the cases. However, I am not sure if hypertrophy always happens. I started to think about wet lungs (pulmonary reason for the left-sided heart failure). Can the ...
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325 views

What is the difference between intracardiac and extracardiac reflexes in cardiac regulation?

The primary parameters of heart pumping are strength of contractility (inotropic positive; Frank-Starling relationship) rate of relaxation (lusitropic positive) heart rate (chronotropic positive) ...
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8k views

Why there is a very high drop in pressure from arteries to arterioles?

Laplace law explains why the pressure is the same in aorta and arteries (100). I am thinking why there is so big drop in pressure when going from arteries to arterioles (40-60). Why there is a great ...
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97 views

Late control mechanisms of blood pressure (arterial) level? [closed]

I first covered the fast and moderate control mechanisms which I think are Fast control: Baroreceptive reflex (tonus), Chemoreceptive reflex (CO$_2$). Moderate control: Bicarbonate (ECF), ...
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5k views

Which processes are during the latent period of ventricular contraction?

The latent period is the time between the start of depolarisation and the start of contraction. I know that the contraction of ventricles starts after sufficient influx of Ca2+ and threshold ...
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107 views

To define the total Resistance of Systemic Blood Circulation

Some systems are in parallel. For instance, the resistance of lungs $R_{\text{lungs}}$. Assume here for simplicity that these parallel systems can be handled linearly. We also consider only Total ...
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168 views

Why does the arch of aorta coils?

My study materials use the word vesselcompression chamber of aorta to emphasize aorta's elastic property. The arch of the aorta only coils, not its straight part. I think the reason why the arch ...
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224 views

Voltage-gated Potassium channels in the action potential of cardiomyocyte?

There is one type of potassium voltage-gated channels open in Phase 1 too. Some call them early repolarization channels. I am not convinced that the channels are different in different phases: 0, 2, ...
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91 views

Why is Aorta sometimes called Compression chamber?

I find this statement that Aorta is called Compression Chamber in my study materials. Aorta can it keeps blood flowing it can accumulate potential energy for bumping and compression However, why ...
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208 views

Regional circulation and Cardiac output? [closed]

I am reading my study materials and think what is the systemic POV here Regional circulation Blood flow within the tissue/organs based on the functional demands of the tissue. E.g. The ...
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399 views

Can you approximate Cardiac Output by Ohm's law?

I found this sentence from my notes which I cannot understand PR < CO, CO $\uparrow$, PR > CO $\downarrow$ where ...
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211 views

Is end-systolic volume (ESV) the same as residual volume?

I am reading this site and my study materials. The end-systolic volume (ESV), 50-60 ml, is the volume of blood found in ventricles after systole and contraction of ventricles. I think ESV is the same ...
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55 views

Could below zero decibel environment cause arrhythmia? [closed]

While this topic has virtually no real life application and has never been examined due to obvious reasons, it is quite intriguing to me. I've read a lot of speculations and claims about the world's ...
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106 views

What is the correct medical procedure(s) for taking a resting heart rate?

Note: I thought the Biology stack exchange would suit this question better than the Fitness stack exchange. Please let me know in the comments if this is not suitable here. I am interested in ...
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84 views

Is this ventricular tachycardia?

I am investigating the public data of this. Its specification ...
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164 views

Sodium levels and blood pressure

Why does low Na+ levels cause hypotension (low blood pressure). Alternatively, why does excessive intake of Na+ cause hypertension or high blood pressure? From what I understand, there are two ...
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150 views

Breakdown current for human body

If I am not mistaken, during exposure to electricity sources it is the magnitude of the current and not the voltage that kills the human body. If so, what is the order of magnitude of current that ...
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73 views

Calling for Free Online Data for Paediatric ECG?

I need free online data about heart murmurs to study these: heart murmur frequency , S2 heart sound frequency and its split, murmur timing, and duration, murmur intensity, S3 sound presence and ...
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Extremely rare occurence of Heart cancer?

The occurrence of Heart cancer (similar, but not the same as Rhabdomyosarcoma) is extremely rare, about 1 per year according to MayoClinic. The reason for this rarity is explained to be the post-...
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71 views

Why are Lymphatic trunks part of the Cardiovascular system?

According to Wikipedia the Terminologia Anatomica (international anatomy standard) the lymphatic trunks are part of the cardiovascular system instead of the lymphoid system. Why did they make that ...
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93 views

What would life expectancy be in the western world in the absence of Ischemic heart disease?

In 2012, the leading cause of death was Ischemic Heart Disease. In 1st world countries, what is the life expectancy for people who do not die of Ischemic Heart Disease? I'm interested in the USA, ...
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18k views

What is the effect of extra-cellular potassium concentration on heart rate and conduction velocity?

If the extracellular potassium concentration surrounding a myocyte increases, then the potassium gradient accross the cell membrane decreases, and therefore the resting membrane potential will become ...
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5k views

How do inward rectifier potassium channels work in the heart?

Apparently in cardiomyocytes, there is an inward rectifying potassium channel that operates during phase 4 of the cardiomyocyte action potential. I have heard that despite this potassium channel ...
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Why does the heart use lipids (and not glucose)?

Fetal hearts use glucose as their primary metabolic substrate. Adult hearts use free fatty acids, which are less efficient (require more $O_2$ to synthesize the same amount of ATP); however, during ...
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2k views

Valves in the heart

I am confused regarding the presence of valves in the superior vena cava. The superior vena cava does not possess valves unlike inferior vena cava, which possesses Eustachian Valve. Then where are ...
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fibroblast cells and fibers

I am interested in fibroblast cells in human arteries. Here are the things that I am not clear at the moment and I could not find any answer from the literature: What are the dimensions of these ...
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174 views

Do nerve cells cause action potential in cardiac muscle?

I think the answer is no, but I am not 100% sure. If it was yes, then the dendrite of the nerve cell should each time receive a stimulus causing Na+ channels to open, when the contraction happen. ...
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83 views

What's seen when stress echocardiography shows ischaemia? Can this happen without angina?

What can be seen on the screen when stress echocardiography (a pair of heart ultrasounds before and after exercise) suggests ischaemia? Can this happen without chest pain? Illustration from Wikipedia:...
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689 views

Why is the blood pressure in the superior vena cava during inhalation less than during the exhalation? [closed]

For further investigation into the progress of the blood pressure, we will measure a patient's blood pressure in the superior vena cava measured during inhalation and during an exhalation. His heart ...
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178 views

Why is elevated homocysteine considered a risk factor for angina?

Elevated homocysteine levels are listed among risk factors for angina. How is homocysteine related to the heart? Or the coronary arteries? How do these relationships make it a risk factor for angina?
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Can stress echocardiography show coronary blood flow difference before and after exercise?

Stress echocardiography means a pair of cardiac ultrasound imaging examinations, before and after exercise. I assume that coronary blood flow is increased after exercise. Is cardiac ultrasound ...
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41 views

If a receptor is inhibited throughout embryogenesis, could there be observable phenotypic differences in the adult?

So I read a journal article entitled "Maternal hypoxia and caffeine exposure depress fetal CV function during primary organogenesis" (Momoi, et al., 2012) and in essence the article speaks of the ...
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934 views

What is the surface area of the human heart?

I heard that the human heart had a surface area of 1000 square feet, and I thought that that cannot be true. So what is the surface area of the human heart and what are the different ways it can be ...