The study of cells: their physiological properties, structure, environmental interaction, division, life cycle, and death, as well as the organelles they contain. Also known as cytology.

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4answers
2k views

Why would a single celled organism evolve to be multi-celled?

I read a story this week on Richard Lenski who has been 'evolving' E. coli for more than 50,000 generations now. One comment I read was from someone who doesn't accept Evolution who pointed out that ...
7
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1answer
369 views

Can an organism exist as a single cell but come together as multi-cellular during certain times?

I am trying to remember a particular segment from a BBC special, in which there was single cellular species. However, at certain times all the individual cells came together to form a structure, not ...
2
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1answer
25 views

Is the ringing sound in the ears caused by dying ear cells?

I was recently watching the movie "Children of Men" (great movie) by Alfonso Cuarón. Now in a certain scene, the lead actor happens to be nearby a loud explosion. Later, when he complains about the ...
6
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1answer
240 views

What allows Valonia ventricosa cells to get so big?

Valonia ventricosa are single celled algae that range between one and few centimeters. In rare cases they can reach sizes exceeding 5cm. They range from grass green, to dark green, and some are even a ...
2
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0answers
13 views

Can ' functional' stress 'forced upon' a cell actually cause cell mutations when they divide and reproduce?

If a group of cells are forced to go beyond their regular biological parameters that they should be under given ' healthy' functioning and while existing in these stressed states some of the cells ...
1
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0answers
18 views

Role of microvilli in cell volume regulation

Does the presence of microvilli on a cell's surface ensure that it's more resistant to cell swelling or lysis in a hypotonic solution, as compared to a normal cell?
2
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1answer
267 views

What is the biochemical reason for mental fatigue?

Is it known exactly why the brain needs sleep? What's dropping low / going high when we experience mental fatigue? I can see why low glucose could result in mental fatigue, are other reasons known?
9
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2answers
184 views

Should we induce fever to assist healing?

I am currently reading "The Fundamentals of Anatomy Physiology" 10th edition, and have found it an incredibly interesting book. I have just been reading about the lymphatic system, and the various ...
2
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0answers
20 views

Can mutation rate be increased for instance by mutagenesis targeting the DNA polymerase?

I am studying a non-cultivable bacterium living in an insect host, and I would like to generate some random mutants of this bacteria while preserving the insect. I am wondering if one way to do so ...
2
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1answer
29 views

Staining cells for FACS at 4 degrees or ambient temperature

I'm sorting a 293 derived line. One thing that is worrisome for me is cell viability after the sort. Usually I have been staining and washing at room temperature (on the benchtop) on a nutator. I have ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Do RBCs need oxygen?

How do our red blood cells (RBCs) get oxygen? Do they even need it? They have no nucleus and no organelles, so I think they don't need it.
1
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1answer
26 views

How does the structure of the pancreatic acinar cell relates to its function?

So the pancreatic acinar cell synthesizes, stores and secretes digestive enzyme precursors called zymogens e.g. pepsinogen. The structure of the acinar cell shows that there is an apical and basal ...
5
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2answers
104 views

Does polyploidy always isolate the polyploids from the diploid source population?

I am receiving conflicting information while researching polyploid speciation. On the one hand, some sources state that a polyploid can only reproduce sexually with polyploids having the same number ...
3
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1answer
35 views

What happens to the excess immune cells or WBC in our body?

When we have an infection our immune system produces a large amount of white blood cells (WBCs) in our body to fight against the pathogen or parasite. My question is after the immune response has ...
10
votes
1answer
181 views

Does the cell internal temperature changes in response to a change in external temperature?

Background Some species are homeotherm (internal temperature is not affected by a change in external temperature) and some are poikilotherm (internal temperature changes in response to external ...
0
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1answer
48 views

Cancer in myogenic heart cells?

Why cancer does not occur in myogenic heart cells? Is there any special ability in heart cells to resist cancer ?
1
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1answer
54 views

When does DIFFUSION occur and not OSMOSIS, and the otherwise?

For example, I do know that red blood cells have both the Na+/Cl- co-transporter and Aquaporin (water channel) that allows both Na/Cl and water molecules to pass through. But why in biology textbooks ...
0
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0answers
14 views

Jurkat single cell clonal expansion

I'm hoping to do a clonal expansion of Jurkat, expressing my construct which is currently transduced virally. From the FACS data I currently have roughly 30-40% expression in my culture but I need it ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

How long do human egg cell grow up?

I read article about alcohol harm where written that child may bear with birth defect cause mother used to drink alcohol 10 years ago so egg cell stay damages that long. I don't believe that human ...
2
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2answers
357 views

How can I create a microcapillary for manipulation of single cells?

i'm working as a diy bio. I'm finding a way to create a micro glass capillary for picking up single cells. I see this video on youtube and would like to know what is the minimum I/O diameter if I pull ...
5
votes
1answer
59 views

Is there a karyotype database for human cell lines?

I'm looking for the karyotype of a specific cell line. Some karyotype are well known, such as HeLa or some carcinomas, but some are very hard to find, such as LG2 (B cells). Is there a database ...
0
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0answers
63 views

How to mimic / approach some animals/insects' anabolism?

This article states that some shelled animals - spiders, scorpions, crabs, worms and other creatures - have metal atoms in their claws, jaws and fangs. I believe through anabolism, since they eat ...
3
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0answers
42 views

L-tryptophan in mammalian cell culture

Why must the concentration of L-tryptophan be kept to a relatively low level when culturing mammalian cells? It's an essential amino acid, so I cannot fathom why low concentrations as opposed to ...
3
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5answers
3k views

Why do cell membranes have a lipid bilayer?

Many cells have a cell membrane composed of two layers of lipids, why is it two layers and not just one? What purpose do the membranes serve?
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0answers
22 views

Is a Ribonuclease Inhibitor protein the only mechanism employed by the human cell to protect cellular RNA from degradation by endoribonuclease?

Are there any other methods of protection for cellular RNA from degradation by endonuclease (specifically the Pancreatic Ribonuclease RNase II (Eosinophil-derived neurotoxin) and RNase III (Eosinophil ...
3
votes
1answer
39 views

How do single-celled predators chase other cells?

From my understanding, single celled organisms have been seen avoiding, and chasing, potential food or other organisms. How do they accomplish this? They do not have eyes or ears or a nervous system. ...
2
votes
1answer
99 views

What is a functional screen?

I was going through this paper, but did not understand a term. What is the meaning of functional screen? (I am not a biology student, I don't understand much, and a small simple explanation would ...
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0answers
19 views

Are there any auto-immune diseases caused by T cells not detaching from antigen presenting cells (APCs)?

By not detaching I'm referring to after they have formed an immunological synapse, if they don't ever detach.
27
votes
2answers
5k views

Why do tattoos persist if body cells are regularly renewed?

I am not quite sure if it is true, but I read somewhere that within 7 years all the body's cells are replaced with new ones. I am not quite sure if it is cells or atoms. If it is then why do tattoos ...
9
votes
2answers
905 views

What are the differences between cancer and tumour?

What are the differences between cancer and tumour? I mean is it in the DNA or shape or something else... And how can a benign tumour turn into a malignant tumour? The body has a lot of tumours all ...
6
votes
2answers
537 views

Are there any multicellular forms of life which exist without consuming other forms of life in some manner?

The title is the question. If additional specificity is needed I will add clarification here. Are there any multicellular forms of life which exist without requiring the consumption (destruction) of ...
30
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2answers
2k views

Can brain cells move?

I was discussing this with my brother. I'm pretty sure I read somewhere that they can move. Thanks EDIT: By movement I mean long distance migration (preferably within the brain only).
3
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0answers
35 views

What Chemical Trigger Causes Ectomycorrhiza To Change From Asexual To Sexual?

I am searching for the catalyst behind the change of asexual to sexual ectomycorrhiza when symbiosis with a tree root is formed. As ectomycorrhiza attaches itself to a root, they form a relationship ...
9
votes
2answers
103 views

Are mitochondria transferable between cell types, individuals and species?

I'm curious about what happens when you insert organelles from a cell into another. In particular, mitochondria. Take two cells from your own body. Somehow extract a mitochondria from one cell and ...
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2answers
49 views

Does ATP hydrolysis reaction have a high or low activation energy?

I was recently studying about ATP and how it functions as an energy carrier to all biological processes; however, I came across a confusing and paradoxical statement from two sources: (at 7:36) and ...
2
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0answers
28 views

Which step in endocytosis requires ATP?

Everybody seems to agree that endocytosis is an energy-using process, and as such requires ATP hydrolysis. However, which particular step requires it? More precisely, which 'molecular machine' ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

How semi-synthetic cell with artificial DNA works

I know that by now this is old new but I heard that a cell that used a synthetic pair of nucleotides, called X and Y, have been made. My question was, how did the cell understand the X and Y ...
5
votes
1answer
42 views

Spatial learning in microorganisms

Has there ever been an experiment performed that demonstrated a form of 'spatial memory' in a unicellular organism? I'm imagining something analogous to the classic 'rat in maze' experiments, but ...
9
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3answers
823 views

Methods of nuclear transfection - nuclear transport

I am reading through the ENCODE papers, which is taking me well out of my comfort zone in terms of modern laboratory techniques. At the risk of asking a question which may well be thoroughly answered ...
9
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0answers
63 views

How is centriole number maintained during meiosis?

I've found a website (Pearson's BioCoach) that claims centrioles duplicate in Prophase II. Is this accurate? Does it depend on the species in question? Looking at three textbook illustrations of ...
8
votes
3answers
6k views

What is the distinction between chemokines, cytokines, interferons and interleukins?

They all seem to describe molecules of similar function and many people seem to use them interchangeably. Also please include any other similar molecules if I've forgotten any in the list above.
5
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2answers
43 views

Why do epithelial cells arrest in response to serum?

Primary epithelial cells, for example human mammary epithelium, fail to proliferate (arrest) in serum-containing medium. Therefore, a common growth medium for epithelium contains pituitary extract ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

Why is there a compound highlighted in red in a KEGG Module search?

Considering the following module: http://www.kegg.jp/kegg-bin/show_module?M00115+C00003 why is the compound C00003 marked in red?
0
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1answer
25 views

Presence of reaction module in bacteria but not in Eukaryotas (human)

From the statistics page, I found that the Module-M00008 is present only in bacteria and not Eukaryotes. Why so? I noticed that all the compounds necessary or the reaction are present in human body ...
3
votes
1answer
31 views

Who compared developmental biology to crystallography?

I need to find out the name of a nineteenth century biologist who compared developmental biology to crystallography. His idea was that crystals are formed from 'cells' (defined molecular units) that ...
2
votes
1answer
33 views

What happens to IP3 molecules after release from IP3 receptors?

IP3 molecules bind to IP3 receptors and open up the calcium channels on the endoplasmic reticulum. I am wondering what happens to IP3 molecules after they have been released from the IP3 receptor? Do ...
3
votes
1answer
73 views

Are there histones present in the cytoplasm?

In this paper the authors depleted core histone heterodimers H3-H4 at 90 % from the cytoplasm of Xenopus oocytes. They state that their concentration is in the order of 6 uM. My question is, are ...
1
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2answers
63 views

Referencing the homologous chromosomes

There exist a co-ordinate system from chromosomes like "12p11.3". In this system, first integer range from 1 to 23 i.e it takes homologous chromosomes as a pair. If we want to distinguish among ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Choosing the best assay for my experiment? [closed]

Which of the following assays can be used to determine whether cell death specifically due to apoptosis has occurred in a given cell sample? Choose all that apply. WST-1 Assay Caspase Colorimetric ...
1
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1answer
42 views