The study of cells, their physiological properties, structure, environmental interaction, division, life cycle, and death, as well as the organelles they contain. Also known as cytology.

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Can you replace glucose with glycerol in cell media?

In order to feed an animal cell in process called Respiration, can I replace Glucose with Glycerol? The Equation bellow: Glycerol + Oxygen -> Water + Carbon Oxide
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0answers
38 views

What a cell needs to survive? [closed]

I'm looking specifically at animal cells. I'm not sure if it needs only Glucose and Oxygen for Aerobic respiration.
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35 views

How do cells grow (ie. gain mass)? [closed]

I have some basic knowledge of the cell cycle. However, I don't understand how cells grow in the Gap phases. How do cells grow? And how does consumed food transfer mass to cells?
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1answer
104 views

Why are considered to be exceptions to the cell theory? [closed]

If I am not mistaken, the cell theory states that: All living organisms are made up of one or more cells Cells are the smallest units of life Cells arise from pre-existing cells Aseptate fungal ...
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0answers
22 views

DNA. mRNA, tRNA [closed]

Can someone explain to me how transcription and translation works, especially the part about codes. And does amino acids has code or is it the tRNA?
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0answers
18 views

If spore possesses 10 chromosomes with 20 picogram DNA then calculate the amount of DNA in prophase II?

Options : a) 20 b) 10 c) 40 According to me, it should be 20 because a cell in prophase II is haploid after completing meiosis I reduction division. Also, spores are haploid, so amount of DNA should ...
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0answers
21 views

Production of energy in the form of ATP is concerned with?

Following are the options : a) Mitochondria b) Elaioplast c) Chloroplast d) Preoxisome e) Golgi Bodies Answer 1 - a) and b) Answer 2 - a) , c) and d) According to me , the answer is 2 because due ...
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1answer
35 views

What information do bipolar cells encode?

Short version: I don't see what information on-centre bipolar cells are actually capturing. Longer: Actually, the question could be extended to on-centre retinal cells as well, but I'll focus on ...
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0answers
21 views

Synthetic biology: examples of cell orientation driven by genes or genetic modification

First of all, forgive for the naive question. I know that genes can drive the shape of cells, as the sickle-shaped red blood cells. On the spirit of synthetic biology or tissue engineering, does ...
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1answer
67 views

Electron Transport Chain in Mitochondria [closed]

I was researching cellular respiration, and this is a rather confusing part. I need help understanding the purpose of Complex II and how the ATP Synthase generates the energy to turn ADP to ATP.
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1answer
39 views

Are there differing organelle to cytoplasm ratio in animal cells?

Could anyone provide me with examples of cells with high organelle to cytoplasm ratios (heavily packed), and examples of cells with low organelle to cytoplasm ratios (sparsely packed)?
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0answers
34 views

Barcode exchange between neighbouring cells

I am currently interested in equipping animal cells in a tissue with individual barcodes. These barcodes should get amplified in the cells (not to a cell degrading extent, of course), and also ...
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1answer
18 views

How is receptor production (recycling) regulated?

My understanding of receptor downregulation is that when activated, a receptor then gets absorbed into its cell, as shown in this weird video. It then gets either recycled or degraded. Tolerance ...
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3answers
96 views

How are chemical reactions organized in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells?

I realized I only have a vague understanding based on what remember from high school and I don't know if they ever really broke it down for us but: In general how do both prokaryotic and eukaryotic ...
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1answer
78 views

How can I accurately measure glucose concentration in culture media?

I am trying to identify the best way to measure glucose concentration in culture media with E. coli. Now, I imagine I can use those glucose meters that diabetic people use, but unfortunately can't ...
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1answer
86 views

What are golgi blobs? [closed]

From a general google search I have come to know that golgi 'blobs'(also referred to as "golgi haze") are tubular vesicles formed during the interphase of mitosis. I would like to be reassured and ...
4
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1answer
59 views

How can neurons divide without centrioles?

I have read in my studies that neurons lack centrioles. If that is so, then how is it possible that new neurons are added to our brain? Does this have anything to do with memory loss?
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1answer
52 views

Thickness / size / volume of a macrophage

What is the thickness of a macrophage? From some available literature it looks like a macrophage has a 'circular' shape of radius ~10 microns. But I need the thickness to calculate its volume.
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1answer
67 views

Cell biology books

I'd like to know, what is the best list of books for non-biologist to understand, how signalling between organels is organized inside of eukaryotic cells. I really want to get how cell as separate ...
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0answers
17 views

What are the major cytological differences between mammalian and non-mammalian cells of the same tissue?

This may be a difficult question to answer, but do we have a comprehensive understanding of the structural differences between cells of the same tissue but different species? For instance, how ...
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0answers
45 views

Are all the atoms in your body replaced with others over a 30 year period?

I was reading Creation - Life and How to Make It by Steve Grand. (This is the book that inspired Jeff Bezos to start the AWS initiative. ) In it he makes the following statement: Anyhow, by now I ...
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0answers
23 views

Issues with scratch test

I have a question about the wound healing migration assay, the scratch test. I have seen several protocols for the test, but there are differences in the addition of medium with FBS (1 night before an ...
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0answers
20 views

Animal skeleton composition?

I know human bone cells are made of calcium, carbon and phosphorus, however I am curious if there are animals with different bone compositions compared to the ones of humans?
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0answers
8 views

Is EGF-mediated proliferation symmetric?

It's known that the MAPK signaling cascade (say, ERK) is downstream of EGFR in epithelial cells, and that EGFR activation can cause proliferation in some cell types in some situations. My question is ...
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1answer
26 views

What is proton leak?

I have some idea about it. Is it the wasteful back flow of H+ ions through uncoupling proteins during aerobic respiration? Thank you
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1answer
38 views

What are respirasomes?

I have read wikipedia but don't understand it well. Do we mean Complex I, II,III and IV when we say respirasomes?
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1answer
157 views

Why are plant cells rectangular and animal cells spherical shaped?

Is that because the plant cells have cell walls and animal cells don't, or is there a function performed by the different shapes? Perhaps round shapes assist the movement of cells?
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1answer
98 views

Structure of mitochondrial ribosomes

Is the ribosome found in mitochondrion and choloroplast formed of 30S and 50S subunits as in prokaryotes. I couldn't find any information on internet concerning it. The general wikipedia page has no ...
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2answers
33 views

Are intercellular junctions, synapses and light-capturing photosynthetic complexes mobile? [duplicate]

I was reading Cell Biology by Gerald Karp and came across a section which said- Membrane fluidity makes it possible for clusters of membrane proteins to assemble at particular sites within the ...
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1answer
70 views

How are ions 'pumped' across a membrane during electron transport?

A number of sites (including this one) that provide descriptions of photosynthesis state that high energy electrons 'pump' ions across a membrane. What is the actual 'pumping' mechanism? I've looked ...
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2answers
979 views

Why are skin moles (pigmented spots) circular in shape?

I have never seen a rectangular or triangular shaped mole. Is there any reason for why moles are roughly circular in shape?
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1answer
61 views

Maintenance of Diploid chromosome number at mitosis

I'm just not understanding this: A regular human cell is diploid - because it has 46 chromosomes, in 23 pairs. So that means that when the cell undergoes mitosis, it will still have the full ...
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0answers
28 views

Artificial Synthesis of Animal Cells

If we know the elements with which a certain type of cell is composed of (I am particularly talking about Animals, and Humans more importantly), why aren't we able to make cells on our own then, in a ...
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0answers
17 views

Do hydrogen ions contribute to water potential?

I was thinking about lysosomes and how they maintain an acidic pH inside themselves by pumping H+ ions from the cytosol. Do hydrogen ions set up a concentration gradient that causes water to move by ...
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2answers
60 views

Cellular specific mass (in grams-dry-weight per pico liter)?

What is the cellular specific mass, in units of pgDW (pico-gram dry-weight) per pL (pico liter)? I suspect there is some variability between cell types, but this variability must be limited. Perhaps ...
4
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1answer
885 views

Why is DNA double stranded and RNA single stranded? [closed]

Why is DNA present as a double helix structure and RNA as a single helix? What causes the difference between them? What are the practical physiological differences between dsDNA and ssRNA? How are the ...
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1answer
54 views

Is there a difference in cytoplasmic pH between prokaryotes and eukaryotes?

The cytosolic pH in human cells is around 7.4, but fluctuates as the cell is replicating. Prokaryotes and eukaryotes are vastly different in many ways. One thing they share is cytoplasm. Is there any ...
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1answer
137 views

An experiment to test if a bacterial resistance gene is on the plasmid or chromosome?

So I have an E.coli strain phenotypicall resistant to the antibiotics ampicillin and rifampicin. How do I test if the AmpR gene is carried on a plasmid and not on the chromosome? In summary, I ...
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0answers
44 views

Are there non-essential cell organelles? [closed]

Suppose an eukaryotic animal cell would have to choose to loose an organelle, akin to the voting system of the TV show Big Brother. Which organelle would be the least important to the cell and ...
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0answers
25 views

How quickly does plant cells regenerate? [closed]

This is a question from my Biology class homework? I've looked online, but I can't find the answer.
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0answers
18 views

Why do kupffer cells not attack sporozoites of malaria?

During malaria, why don't kuppfer cells (hepatic macrophages) attack the plasmodium and stop schizogony, thus saving us from the disease?
2
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1answer
50 views

Why does protein kinase C activated by different means have different effects?

I could be way off base but I think I remember learning that Protein Kinase C has some effects when activated by one pathway and other effects when activated by another. How does this happen? Is it ...
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1answer
30 views

Is there a way to determine how many times a given cell divided?

Do cells divide into exact duplicates? If not, is there a way to determine how many times a given cell divided?
2
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1answer
30 views

What is the name of the property of viruses can activate a second time, with different symptoms?

The Varicella zoster virus causes chickenpox in children and shingles in adults. It appears after the initial infection, it can go dormant in the nerve, and reactivate itself decades later. In ...
3
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0answers
49 views

What is the name of the category of viruses that affect only one side of the body?

The Varicella zoster virus causes chickenpox in children and shingles in adults. When the virus attacks as shingles, one of its distinguishing characteristics is that it only affects one side of the ...
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0answers
8 views

HSC Cycling Rates

I would like to know how often human hematopoietic stem cells go into cycle in the bone marrow niche (with a paper reference). I have heard they cycle 1-2 times per year but has anyone robustly ...
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1answer
41 views

What is the name of the property of viruses that can go dormant in the host for 30 years?

The Varicella zoster virus causes chickenpox in children and shingles in adults. It appears after the initial infection, it can go dormant in the nerve, and reactivate itself decades later. My ...
1
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1answer
45 views

Lookup for transporter locations in humans

I am interested in several transporters and cotransporters (eg SLC12A1/2 and many others), more precicely, in (human) organism that are made of cells containing those transporters. So does anyone know ...
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1answer
21 views

Is there a resource that has quantitative data about cell proteins?

I am a MSc student working in mathematical biology. In my thesis I am modelling diffusion of a protein that can bind to cell surface receptors. In order to simulate this I need some rough figures ...
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0answers
20 views

What is the site on an enzyme that binds either exitatory or inhibitory molecules? [closed]

A site on an enzyme where either exitatory or inhibitory molecules can bind is called a(n): A) electron transport site B) active site C) coenzyme D) metabolic pathway E) allosteric site If you ...