The study of cells, their physiological properties, structure, environmental interaction, division, life cycle, and death, as well as the organelles they contain. Also known as cytology.

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What is the site on an enzyme that binds either exitatory or inhibitory molecules? [closed]

A site on an enzyme where either exitatory or inhibitory molecules can bind is called a(n): A) electron transport site B) active site C) coenzyme D) metabolic pathway E) allosteric site If you ...
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1answer
17 views
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76 views

Why white Hair Turns Dark Again [closed]

I am 73 years old extremely healthy according to my blood tests and yet my hair is turning dark at the roots. I take no medications since I do not have need of any whatsoever so why this strange back ...
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1answer
43 views

Why does ESR have to be waited for one hour?

It is said that the length of the column of clear plasma in a narrow tube left by erythrocytes which gradually sediments after one hour is the measure of ESR(erythrocyte sedimentation rate). Its ...
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1answer
44 views

What's the mixture of plasma and haemoglobin called [closed]

I know of oxyhaemoglobin but the mixture of plasma and haemoglobin in the blood gives what?
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1answer
55 views

What's the mixture of carbon and haemoglobin called [closed]

I know of oxyhaemogloblin , the mixture of oxygen and haemoglobin , but carbon and haemoglobin combination is what's confusing
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1answer
76 views

Can soap kill cockroaches and/or ants? If so, how? [duplicate]

Is it possible to use dishwashing soap as an alternative insecticide? How would that and what are the components of the dishwashing soap that would kill the insect?
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1answer
39 views

Is there some research paper which focus on the influence of using cancer cell as experimental materials on experimental result? [closed]

Cancer cell is unstable cell and high variation, but there are many experiment use cancer cell as experimental materials. I always wonder how much influence can using cancer cell as experimental ...
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23 views

is there any relationship between shape of the nucleus and the function of the cell?

is there any relationship between the shape of the nucleus and the function of the cell, like in the case of leukocytes, all of them have different shapes.
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1answer
13 views

Is there one centomere for the two chromatids in a dyad? [closed]

I have no explanation for this. It is all I have to ask. Thank you
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47 views

What is plectonemic coiling? When does it uncoil?

Is it the inseparable coiling of two double stranded helices (each representing a chromatid)? In early prophase the chromosome appear as coiled filaments but in late prophase each chromosome has two ...
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11 views

Function of NEZHA gene [closed]

What is the function of NEZHA? What effect does it have on microtubules and PLEKHA7? What happens after it has been knocked down?
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1answer
93 views

Why it seems that principles of chemistry are not being applied in this biochemical process? [closed]

According to an answer in this question, my concept used below does not apply: In the non-cyclic photophosphorylation, consider splitting of two water molecules, then 4 e- (electrons) and 4 H+ (...
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45 views

What’s wrong with a shriveled cell?

When you place a cell into a hypotonic solution, water rushes into it and it bursts/lyses. Thus, the cell dies. However, when you place a cell into a hypertonic solution, water rushes out of it and ...
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39 views

Converting miRNA names

I need to convert all of my microRNA names e.g. hsa-miR-30e-5p to e.g. entrez gene IDs, ensemble IDs or another ID. Does anyone know a good ID conversion tool for microRNAs? (I managed to convert it ...
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1answer
58 views

How is CO2 related to acidity in plant cells?

Why does increase in concentration of CO2 in a plant cell increase the acidity of the cell sap? Thank you
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2answers
58 views

Structure of Cell

Are cells spheres or ovals/circles bound by phospholipidbilayer? If they are spherical how are we able to see the nucleus through the phospholipid bilayer under a microscope?
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26 views

mRNA extraction from mice ears.

I am trying to extract RNA from mice ears and for some reason I don't have RNA when I perform the electrophoresis. I directly cut the ears and I put it in a tube with a bead and trizol. then I place ...
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34 views

Can the activity of bacteria be influenced by magnetism? [closed]

Some organisms are tuning their direction on a magnetic field. But are bacteria also reacting on magnetic fields and can it be used in health therapie as a kind of 'antibiotic'?
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1answer
68 views

What do proton pump inhibitors do?

I know that sodium azide and 2,4-DNPH inhibit proton pumps. The azide is called an inhibitor and 2,4-DNP is called uncoupler. I want to know what's the difference between the mechanisms of action of ...
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1answer
129 views

What causes swelling after impact?

Why does the head swell after getting hit by something hard? What is the liquid that forms after impact?
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0answers
111 views

Why did multicellular organisms evolve when a single cell can survive on its own? [duplicate]

Since unicellular organisms can survive, why would there be evolution of multicellular organisms?
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1answer
55 views

Why did eukaryotic cells develop? [closed]

If eukaryotic cells can survive in extreme conditions, then why are their still prokaryotic organisms?
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64 views

Could a single cell be brought to life?

If a scientist is observing a single cell under a microscope, and then realizes that the cell has died, is it possible to bring that dead cell back to life? For my inquiry, let's assume that the ...
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0answers
33 views

Is it possible to make the human cells totipotent? [closed]

we all know humans are not capable of regenerating from a single cell. Is there any possibility that we can make cells totipotent?
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34 views

Bacteria surviving a β-lactam antibiotic

What changes can occur in the cell wall of a bacteria for it to survive a β-lactam antibiotic? I think that because a bacteria possesses peptidoglycan in its cell wall, they are β-lactam sensitive, ...
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22 views

What percent of cells are lysed when I make my smoothie?

This is an entirely irreverent question, but it does concern biology. I'm a physicist by training so I like to be able to estimate order of magnitude. I made a smoothie the other day with milk, ...
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1answer
72 views

ADCs: by what mechanism are antibodies internalised [closed]

I read that ADCs (Antibody-Drug Conjugates) act by a -mab for a particular target being bonded to a cytotoxic compound. From my high-school-with-crayons knowledge of antibodies, however, one part of ...
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1answer
39 views

How does symbiogenesis explain reproduction of organelles along with the cell?

Symbiogenesis is an evolutionary theory that says that prokaryotes eventually evolved into eukaryotes (having multiple organelles and better structure) by forming symbiotic relationships with other ...
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2answers
55 views

Diffusion coefficient of cells in blood?

What's the diffusion coefficient of white cells in blood? Is it well defined, or are cells too large and few as to be treated as particles in this context? P.S. I have tried to look this up, but what ...
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2answers
352 views

Growth factors vs. mitogens

According to Campbell Biology, A growth factor is a protein released by certain cells that stimulates other cells to divide. and according to Wikipedia, A mitogen is a chemical substance ...
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1answer
33 views

Advantage of GCPRs over RTKs or other receptor protein kinases

My book lists two important differences between GCPRs and receptor protein kinases: GCPRs do not directly activate a signal transduction pathway. It only does so indirectly, via a G protein. On the ...
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1answer
44 views

Normal cell diffusion in normal organism?

We know, that cancer cell can travel across an organism. Is this ABSOLUTELY impossible for NORMAL cells? For example, is it EXACTLY ZERO probability to find some bone cells inside liver or some skin ...
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2answers
206 views

Density of cells in human tissues?

Where can I find values, or estimates, of the density of cells in human tissues? Maybe an overall estimate, or distinct values for distinct tissues? Or maybe not human, but mammal tissues (which ...
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1answer
151 views

HOw are AMP's “recharged” to become ATP's in a cell?

I understand that after the translation stage of ribosomal protein synthesis, tRNA molecules are floating in the cytoplasm without attached amino acids until they find the correct aminoacyl tRNA ...
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1answer
36 views

Are axons capable of endocytosis?

There is evidence for the uptake of toxic substances like prions from the cell bodies of neurons via endocytosis. There is also evidence for prion deposition in white matter. But I haven't been able ...
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1answer
68 views

Can a cell start a mitosis if it lacks energy or molecules to complete it?

I'm wondering whether a cell can start a mitosis if it lack molecules or energy to fully complete it. From what I'm reading on wikipedia the cell passes most of its time in the interphase in which the ...
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1answer
62 views

How difficult is it to make a shRNA/miRNA/siRNA to silence/knockdown NaV1.7 voltage gated sodium channels in humans?

There have been various research projects that experimented with shRNA/miRNA/siRNA to specifically silence/knockdown NaV1.7 voltage gated sodium channels in small animals like rats & guinea pigs. (...
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1answer
52 views

Is HSV-vector-mediated miRNA expression in dorsal root ganglia stable?

My question is on the following article: "Reduction of voltage gated sodium channel protein in DRG by vector mediated miRNA reduces pain in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy" My question is, do ...
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2answers
307 views

At any given moment, how much energy is stored in the human body as ATP?

At any given moment, approximately how much energy is stored in the human body as ATP in the ADP-P-bond? This of course depends on what type of cell it is and the activity of the individual in ...
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1answer
43 views

What is the purpose of requiring two separate binding systems for the antibody response?

I've read that in most cases, B-cell activation requires helper T-cells. This requires antigen binding by both antibodies and T-cell receptors, using two different antigen-binding proteins, ...
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1answer
56 views

How was gene therapy able to cure diseases through the transformation of actively dividing cells?

I thought that gene therapy, when performed on target cells that regenerate themselves constantly, can be effective for a limited time only. I.e., the effect gradually wears off after a while, ...
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2answers
48 views

At which end does polymerization of microtubules occur?

My book says that polymerization and depolumerization of microtubules occurs on the + end however, I've found a note that says that depolymerization occurs on the - end. I need help please :) thank ...
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30 views

Effects of pH vs membrane potential within a cell? [closed]

How are these two concepts related? Does changing each result in the same effects? As in: what kind of reactions/processes would be affected if we changed the pH within a cell? Would the results ...
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2answers
93 views

In cell division, are daughter cells identical?

I understand that after a cell replicates, there will be two daughter cells instead of one. But wouldn't one of them be the old cell that created the second one? The old cell having gone through G0, ...
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1answer
39 views

Constant or variable number of chiasmata during recombination?

During recombination, is the number of chiasmata consistent for each gamete and are the chiasmata regions consistent within a single organism?
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1answer
210 views

Do human somatic cells have 46 chromosomes all the time?

As far as I know, a human somatic cell has the cell cycle: Interphase and Replication (mitosis). In interphase the cell has 2 growth phases (G1 + G2) and a synthesis one (S phase being in between G1 ...
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How sorbitol treatment selects ring stage of plasmodium falciparum

I would like to know the basic chemistry behind ring stage selection by sorbitol. Sorbitol is used for Synchronising the plasmodium culture in ring stage. How the chemical retains or selects ring ...
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3answers
210 views

Do chromosomes uncoil in interphase II?

During interphase II, there is no S phase in which DNA replicates. However, in this stage, do the chromosomes remain wound? Or have they unwound into chromatin form, and recondense during prophase II?