The study of cells: their physiological properties, structure, environmental interaction, division, life cycle, and death, as well as the organelles they contain. Also known as cytology.

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Why is most tissue cellular?

Most tissue is comprised of cells. Why? It would seem inefficient to have so many individual nucleus, membranes, etc.? Specifically: Not all tissue is cellular. Much tissue is extracellular matrix. ...
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457 views

Is collagen supplementation useless?

When collagen is digested is it broken up into usable components that the body can use to produce its own collagen? What evidence is there that supplementing with collagen type I & II etc.. can ...
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Can someone explain the color-changing unit (CCU) to me?

I've been physically carrying out serial tenfold dilutions on samples of Ureaplasma to work out the color-changing units (CCU). As a definition, the CCU is the highest dilution at which there is a ...
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25 views

A program for cell motility assessment with a batch process function?

Cell motility assessment is a branch of experimental biology or medical science. One example could be an assessment of treatment effects on sperm motility of an animal. The standard procedure involves ...
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65 views

Microscopy Book Suggestions

I've learned programming through great book recommendations, many from the Stack Exchange series of sites. I'm hoping to take this approach to gaining a fundamental understanding of how fluorescence ...
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47 views

Patch-Clamping Neurons Resources

Are there any lectures available on Patch-Clamping? Were can I find a mathematical model of Patch-Clamp? (that can be easily implemented in matlab). I have found some step-by-step protocols on ...
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What metabolically happens when an egg fuses with the nucleus of a somatic cell

In stem cell biology, it is recognized that embryonic stem cells are transcriptionally inactive for the first 3 days of development. However, during somatic cell nuclear transfer, the nucleus is ...
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535 views

DNA is charged negative. Where is all the positive charge in my body?

DNA is charged negative because of its phosphate backbone. Since charges need to be balanced (so that there are no charges building up somewhere), what is the positive charge which neutralizes this ...
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67 views

Why doesn't the cytosol dissolve the polar structures?

we know that cytoplasm of cells are filled with water molecules and other hydrophilic molecules so my question is why the water of cytosol doesn't dissolve the ionic part of the lipid bilayer or why ...
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104 views

What do cells do when they aren't creating proteins?

I've always thought that the majority of the "work" in a cell is protein production, until I read the following. The Wikipedia article on the central dogma of molecular biology states this: 80% ...
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85 views

Why are red blood cells considered to be cells?

Wikipedia states that a cell is the basic structural, functional and biological unit of all known living organisms. Cells are the smallest unit of life that can replicate independently. It then ...
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294 views

How exactly does marijuana damage brain cells?

I've heard that THC can cause permanent damage to brain cells. I've also heard this reffered to anti drug propaganda. Another theory i've read is that temporary effects reduce intelligence but long ...
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101 views

Where does an organism store reserves of amino acids?

Where does an organism store reserves of the amino acids it needs to build various proteins it needs -- in the liver ? in the blood ? in every cell ? Thanks
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33 views

Trimming of tRNA precursors

From Molecular Biology of the Cell (4th edition) by Bruce Alberts et al. (Chp 6, Pg 338) : Both bacterial and eucaryotic tRNAs are typically synthesized as larger precursor tRNAs, and these are ...
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74 views

How do nutrients get to the cells they need to get to?

I understand the basics of digestion. I know that nutrients get absorbed by the microvilli, enter the bloodstream and travel to the liver but after all that, what is the biological mechanism that ...
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59 views

Structure of biological membranes?

Integral membrane proteins have functional asymmetry i.e. they have two different domains of proteins performing different functions. these proteins have Tyr and Trp amino acid residues at the ...
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66 views

What will happen if we expose the brain to an intermittent light?

If a brain is exposed to an intermittent light are specific areas going to fire? If yes, which of them? Is there any experiment about this?
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64 views

Termination of translation

What dissociates first - the last tRNA, mRNA and release factors or the subunits of ribosomes? I tried searching this from Lehninger but couldn't get a clean answer.
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300 views

Beginning with centrifuge experiment

This is the first time I do a centrifuge experiment with my own centrifuge machine, it's just simple made by a rotor that can rotate the tube at high speed. As I know a centrifuge machine can be using ...
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130 views

Up to date B cell review

Where would I find an up to date (last 6-7 years max) review on B cells? I've tried searching through pubmed with filters, cochrane library, medline and various other resources including searching old ...
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56 views

Measuring the density of surface antigens

I'm trying to get a sense of the variety of methods used for determining the number of cell surface antigens and receptors. This is notably different from determining the affinity of these surface ...
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88 views

Mitochondria - are they really separate organisms that once merged into eukaryotic cells?

Theoretically, mitochondria are said to be a separate organism that is concerned with its own life and its own processes. In fact, it even duplicates individually. I know a similar question is here ...
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66 views

Can (any) human cells learn?

I'm not talking about single celled organisms, but actual cells in your body. Is there any evidence that they can learn to, say, navigate an environment or avoid an aversive stimulus like an animal ...
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58 views

How to study the effect on tau protein isoforms on microtubule based transport?

From what I read, A-beta plaques inhibit microtubule based transport of mitochondria when tau protein is present in the cell. How would I be able to do a test to see if one isoform of tau is more ...
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390 views

Explanation of the terms “downstream signaling” and “upstream signaling”

In molecular biology, what's the meaning of the terms "downstream signaling" and "upstream signaling"? What's the difference between them?
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Connection between genes and pathways

I am reading about a paper about inferencing pathway information in cancer cells. Authors refer to ERBB2 as a gene and a pathway. I don't have solid biology background. What exactly means when we ...
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207 views

Homework : Sodium Potassium pump

Why does sodium-potassium pump consume about 2/3 energy of a cell ? A.maintains appropriate membrane potential B.helps in co-transport I think it should be A.
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How did viruses learn to utilize the workings of a cell?

This is my first post here, so excuse me for its simplicity. Viruses can infiltrate a cell, overtake it and multiply. It has projecting fibers whose ends are shaped as kind of a "key" to a mobile ...
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233 views

Will lipid molecules 'flip-flop' over a membrane without the use of an enzyme?

All of the references to this I can find refer to enzymes like Flippase making it 'easier' or 'more likely' that the translocation will occur, rather than actually make it possible. The following is ...
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Simulating Cell differentiation

I'm a computer programmer deeply interested in Biology. I wish to write a computer simulation for cell differentiation. I understand there will be seemingly impossible challenges in doing this. But ...
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70 views

Experiments in vitro vs those with dead organisms and fixated tissue

Does the term in vitro necessarily imply that the organism/organs/cells of study are dead? If not, is there an alternative latin term to refer to studies of dead biological matter ? (e.g. in ...
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10 views

epitope prediction/ mapping

B-CELL EPITOPE PREDICTION Regarding this article: "Such a molecule can be synthesized or, in case of a protein, its gene can be cloned into an expression vector."----- is a particular line in ...
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18 views

Difference between sequential and conformational epitope

Is the difference only in its structure? Like conformational epitope has 3D structure while sequential has a linear structure?(I have not studied biology since last 8 years and now I am going through ...
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54 views

Inductance in cell

In an animal cell, especially neuron and in particular its axon, while there is electrical resistance and capacitance mechanism in the cell, which play essential roles in the cable theory model of ...
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92 views

How do some plants grow in salt water, while others die?

My question is basically out of curiosity and comes from observing how certain plants (such as mangroves or salt cedar) can grow in seawater. If this gives the plant an advantage, why haven't all ...
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141 views

What kind of a microscope do I need to see cell organelles?

I would like to study cells and looking for a microscope that would allow me to see: groups of cells individual cell cells organelles I would like to target insects and mammal tissue. I would be ...
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330 views

How is the mRNA transported out of the endoplasmic reticulum?

In eukaryotes the nuclear envelope is continuous with the ER, so what helps it out of that?
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How do plant cell divide without centrioles?

Most plants do not have centrioles , so who does their function ?
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165 views

Why did Fair Meiosis evolve?

How and why did Fair Meiosis evolve? I can hardly think that it provided a fitness advantage to the individual carrying the mutation. Why would it? Or did it evolve through lineage selection? Or was ...
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793 views

fibroblast cells and fibers

I am interested in fibroblast cells in human arteries. Here are the things that I am not clear at the moment and I could not find any answer from the literature: What are the dimensions of these ...
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45 views

What is the title of Darwin's paper on cellular structure?

I read somewhere that Darwin wrote a paper that dealt with cellular structure, but I've been unable to find the title or contents of the paper because Darwin wrote such a volume of material. What is ...
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39 views

What is the role of lamellar bodies in lung cells?

Lamellar bodies have been found to be secreted in lung cells many of their associated proteins have been identified. What is the current consensus or research on the function that these lamellar ...
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36 views

Regarding signalling pathways

Do all signalling pathways have something that can inhibit them? If the signal pathway is benefitial and it is inhibited would the inhibitor be caused by a biological problem? Are all inhibitors ...
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1answer
48 views

What cells don't have a primary cilium?

It is often stated that most cells in the human body have a primary cilium. Which ones don't? For which cells is it unknown?
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66 views

Why are some scorpion species fluorescent under UV light?

It's known for some scorpion species such as Pandinus imperator, Heterometrus Petersii etc. to be shining under UV light. That makes them easier to capture and collect by humans. Is there any ...
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73 views

Are cell lines potentially dangerous?

More specifically, if a human subject was exposed to, say, a human cancerous cell line (via intravenous injection or through an open wound, for example), is it possible that they would develop any ...
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68 views

Solubility of Forskolin in ethanol

I am interested in using forskolin in cell culture medium. Does anyone know how to make solution of 10 microM forskolin in 5% ethanol or less. I would like to avoid using DMSO as a solvent. Thank you. ...
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1answer
887 views

Why would a single celled organism evolve to be multi-celled?

I read a story this week on Richard Lenski who has been 'evolving' E. coli for more than 50,000 generations now. One comment I read was from someone who doesn't accept Evolution who pointed out that ...
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47 views

Exotic Cell Shapes

As far as I know, plant cell shapes are a difficult thing to pin down. However plant cells have cell walls and so can be very rigid. However the only plant cells I've seen have been either block ...
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66 views

Autophagy in eukaryotic cells

What is autophagy? How and under which circumstances is it used by the cell? I believe The reason for autophagy is some kind of recycling, am I right? But why does it occur in infections?