The study of cells: their physiological properties, structure, environmental interaction, division, life cycle, and death, as well as the organelles they contain. Also known as cytology.

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How do mosquitoes maintain telomere length?

While the vast majority of eukaryotic organisms maintain their chromosome ends (telomeres) via telomerase, an enzyme system that generates short, tandem repeats on the ends of chromosomes, other ...
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129 views

MTT assay normalization

Since the precise amount of cells in each well of an MTT assay varies, how can I normalize the results by cell number/concentration? How can I take into account the number of cells that have already ...
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37 views

Nearly Exhaustive List for Cholesterol Pathways

I have run across an interesting case that is similar to only two others I've encountered. What makes it interesting is the combination of undetectable (under normal testing conditions, can elaborate ...
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69 views

Gap junction turnover

Gap junction proteins, connexins, are known to form intercellular hemichannels, between two adjacent cells. These junctions are maintained cell adhesion proteins (cadherins), yet the turnover of ...
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242 views

Primary cilia: what cell types have non-motile cilia that migrate?

My understanding is that there are two broad categories of cilia: motile and non-motile (also called primary. Examples of the former include sperm flagella and the cilia of epithelial cells that ...
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75 views

Diffusion of FAD+

Why is NAD+ free to diffuse within the mitochondrion whereas FAD+ is not ? What biochemical properties cause this difference ?
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51 views

how cells make other macro molecules?

We know that the nucleus of the cell is the White House of the cell and its DNA is the president and it commands to make protein. So my question when DNA only codes for protein and enzymes,after the ...
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27 views

What are the effect of microtubule or microfilament inhibition on yeast expression profile?

I was wondering whether anyone has looked at what are the expression changes in yeast when the microtubule or the microfilament polymerization is inhibited? Have there been whole-genome studies?
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180 views

Benefits of CLARITY?

What are the benefits of CLARITY over this technique that was published more than a year earlier? Of course the second technique needs a fancier microscope that is likely more expensive and requires ...
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Explanation of the terms “downstream signaling” and “upstream signaling”

In molecular biology, what's the meaning of the terms "downstream signaling" and "upstream signaling"? What's the difference between them?
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Why is succinate dehydrogenase attached to the inner mitochondrial membrane?

Succinate dehydrogenase is attached to the inner mitochondrial membrane.All the other enzymes of the Krebs cycle are located in the matrix of mitochondria. What is the biochemical reason behind ...
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189 views

Microtiter Dish Biofilm Formation Assay- Pseudomonas and Crystal Violet

If Pseudomonas is a gram negative bacteria, it does not retain crystal violet but why is it that so many people are using crystal violet staining in theri Microtiter Dish Biofilm Formation Assay?
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107 views

Smoking, cancer, correlation between quitting smoking and increased immediate risk

There is "proof" out there today that suggests smoking is directly linked to cancer. I cannot argue against that, for the evidence in favor appears strong, and the evidence against is lacking. I'll ...
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126 views

What is splice junction pairs?

Splicing is a modification of pre mRNA when all introns are removed and exons are joined. What is a splice junction pair? It is two exons which connected together?
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33 views

Dinuclei cellular mechanism

I am no biologist, but I have this question buzzing in my mind. It's a matter of curiosity What happens when two nuclei occupy the same cell? Would we expect the embryo (if it lives) to have complex ...
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210 views

Which of the cell types commonly found in mammals has the greatest number of mitochondria?

This is basically a fun question, inspired by this answer on scifi.se. So, which cell type will have the greatest number of mitochondria? Obviously, I am talking about wild type, healthy individuals ...
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why is AUG the initiation codon?

Is there any reason why AUG is the initiation codon ? Why is there a need for an initiation codon ? Can't translation start with different codons?
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157 views

Improving transformation efficiencies- induce supercoiling?

From my limited knowledge of science, I know transformation can be one of the hardest step in cloning, and that a large amount of research/trial and error has been done to improve on this step. I've ...
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57 views

Connection between genes and pathways

I am reading about a paper about inferencing pathway information in cancer cells. Authors refer to ERBB2 as a gene and a pathway. I don't have solid biology background. What exactly means when we ...
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139 views

How does human body deal with inert solid material in the bloodstream?

How does human body deal with inert solid material in the bloodstream? For example, if there is a powder of glass injected into our bloodstream, will the white blood cells do anything or will kidney ...
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92 views

How extensive is CD47?

CD47 aka the "don't eat me" signal has recently been claimed to be expressed on all tumor cells. This doesn't seem to corroborate with other cell-biology experiments. On what other cells is CD47 ...
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115 views

What is the smallest oligocelluar organism?

What is the smallest oligocelluar organism? How many cells does it have? EDIT The question is motivated by this comment@Philosophy.SE EDIT as recommended in comments I'm looking for an example of ...
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67 views

Is forced cell growth related to apoptosis?

Could an instance of forced cellular growth cause some cells to have their self-destruct mechanisms to malfunction or 'turn off'thus preventing apoptosis?
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136 views

How do detergents get in hydrophobic membrane interior?

According to Molecular And Cellular Biology (Stephen L. Wolfe), Membranes disperse almost instantaneously if exposed to a nonpolar environment or to detergents, which are amphipathic molecules ...
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62 views

Missing cells from immunopanning

Why do I not have any cells left in my positive panning plate after transferring from the negative panning plate during immunopanning? I am trying to purify retinal ganglion cells from postnatal rats ...
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Looking for raw cell videos from a light microscope

First off, I'm not looking for online lectures. I am trying to find creative commons licensed videos of live cells moving around without annotation or anything extra. I would prefer a few minutes of ...
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What is the distinction between chemokines, cytokines, interferons and interleukins?

They all seem to describe molecules of similar function and many people seem to use them interchangeably. Also please include any other similar molecules if I've forgotten any in the list above.
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307 views

How much does the Hayflick limit/telomere length vary across taxa and within humans?

Since they seem to be quite connected, I'm curious if anyone knows of research comparing the Hayflick limit (and presumably by extension telomere length) between different taxa. I've heard the ...
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Cell life: division for immortality or reproduction with aging

Are the two cells that are derived from one cell, ‘twin sisters’ or a ‘mother and a daughter’? In other words, can a cell really be divided to live an "immortal" life or is cell reproduction the ...
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Time spent in phases of cell cycle

I am looking for references to papers containing the time intervals spent in different phases of the cell cycle (ej., G0, G1, S, G2, M for eukaryotes) for different cells. In particular, I am ...
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Do animal cells have vacuoles?

I overheard a rather heated argument about whether or not animal cells have vacuoles. One person said that they do, but they're much smaller than vacuoles in plant cells. The other person said they ...
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68 views

What's a replicate line?

The methods section inside a paper I'm reading make mention of replicate lines. Example: "We founded 10 replicate lines from a single clone". This is in the context of experimental evolution and ...
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494 views

Does electricity cause damage on a cellular level?

As I understand it the mechanism of death when a mammal is electrocuted is that the current disrupts the SAN/AVN in the heart causing it to fibrilate or arrest. That's on a macro scale, however. ...
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132 views

Why are transmembrane proteins difficult to crystallise?

I know that in vivo there are a lot fewer transmembranous proteins in general, and that they are produced at a lower rate than their free counterparts. This is mainly because transmembrane proteins ...
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89 views

What will happen if we expose the brain to an intermittent light?

If a brain is exposed to an intermittent light are specific areas going to fire? If yes, which of them? Is there any experiment about this?
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271 views

Homework : Sodium Potassium pump

Why does sodium-potassium pump consume about 2/3 energy of a cell ? A.maintains appropriate membrane potential B.helps in co-transport I think it should be A.
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Body's decomposition

Does a human body decompose in a completely sterile environment ? If yes, what decomposes it ? And how fast ? What happens in vacuum ? Can it remain exactly the same ? Thanks
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How is the mRNA transported out of the endoplasmic reticulum?

In eukaryotes the nuclear envelope is continuous with the ER, so what helps it out of that?
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Are there any enzymes in cytoplasm to help the newly-synthesized polypeptide to form tertiary structure?

Polypeptides made by ribosomes which attach to rER will go into the rER to form the tertiary structure. Those polypeptides made by free ribosomes usually stay in cytoplasm. So are there any enzymes in ...
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85 views

Attaching suspension cells to coverslip duing mycoplasma contamination detection

I am planing to screen my cell cultures for mycoplasma contamination using the Hoechst 33258 DNA staining method. This method is suitable for adherent cultures. Is this method suitable for ...
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Where can I find a full genealogy of human cell types?

It is said on Wikipedia, that the precursor of blastocyst is a morula, and that the precursor of morula is a zygote. This gives us the part of genealogy tree of cell types. Unfortunately, no full ...
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How does skin healing work?

I stacked my bike and split my head right open. About three weeks later the scab falls off and the skin is sealed over, like magic! How does it all work? How does the brain know that part of the ...
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727 views

Is cell membrane living

We say cell wall is dead but nobody says cell membrane is dead. Is cell membrane living or dead ? If it is not dead then why is it not included in protoplasm : Protoplasm is the living contents ...
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694 views

How does formaldehyde/PBS or methanol fixation of cells affect lysosomal pH?

The question is fairly simple - does formaldehyde or methanol fixation in preparation for immunocytochemistry/immunofluorescent staining affect the pH of the lysosomes? Some background: I'm trying to ...
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78 views

Do mitochondrial DNA have repair enzymes?

Mitochondria are considered endosymbionts originated from a prokaryote. So, do they have a DNA repair mechanism ?
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Can you consider a human as alive, or is it the cells on the body that are alive?

Sorry if this question seems strange, but in the recent time I have been interested in the question of what life is and how you can define life. My question: How long can individual cells live on a ...
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How is saltatory conduction faster than conduction of unmyelinated fibers? [duplicate]

It's always the same explanation that currents are able to "hop" along Ranvier nodes instead of passing continuously along the axon making saltatory conduction more efficient than continuous ...
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76 views

Termination of translation

What dissociates first - the last tRNA, mRNA and release factors or the subunits of ribosomes? I tried searching this from Lehninger but couldn't get a clean answer.
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Number of genes required to sustain life

Are there estimates of the minimum number of genes required to sustain life? In what I mean by life here, I don't include viruses.
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Methods of nuclear transfection - nuclear transport

I am reading through the ENCODE papers, which is taking me well out of my comfort zone in terms of modern laboratory techniques. At the risk of asking a question which may well be thoroughly answered ...