The study of cells, their physiological properties, structure, environmental interaction, division, life cycle, and death, as well as the organelles they contain. Also known as cytology.

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1answer
29 views

Can specific B-cells be created in a lab? [closed]

Instead of creating protein sequences, could that stepped be skipped and just have B-cells created to manufacture a particular type of immunity?
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1answer
48 views

Determining the osmolarity and tonicity of a cell

Consider a cell with urea concentration inside being 2mmol/L and outside being 2.5mmol/L. The cell itself is permeable to both urea and water. Ignoring the effect of other osmolytes, A) Urea flows ...
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1answer
26 views

Gene silencing in C. elegans

I am trying to silence the tph-1 (tryptophan hydroxylase) gene in C. elegans using the pLT63 plasmid to check if that particular gene has anything to do with the pharyneal pumping or not. Am I using ...
2
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1answer
33 views

How does the drug MBC effect the depolymerization of microtubules in eukaryotic cells?

I have tried to look for the mechanism of how methyl benzimidazol-2-yl-carbamate affects microtubules in eukaryotes, but what I found wasn't very useful: Quilan et al 1980 assert that it acts by ...
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4answers
165 views

Can general soap kill bacteria?

I have read that general soap can kill bacteria by opening holes in the bacterial membrane. http://questions.sci-toys.com/node/90 However, I found some articles as well saying that it cannot. http:/...
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1answer
66 views

Is there any possible way to take a DNA test without using blood in humans?

Is there any possible way to take a DNA test without the need to draw blood in humans? Any information will be useful for me.
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1answer
44 views

How can rapid growth cancer get nutrients in vivo?

When I was little, before I get into biological studying, I read a news talking about cancer would be totally cured after decades. I still remember that researchers had a theory to claim if they could ...
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0answers
45 views

yeast colonies pulsing out soft fringes against the light

I have no idea about this part of the following text "pulsing out soft fringes against the light". Can anybody explain about it and provide some images, please? Does it mean that these colonies ...
0
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1answer
56 views

Common genes and enzymes involved in pathogen entry into host

Many microbes like Salmonella, E.coli, Legionella pneumophila etc. enter host cells via cystoskeleton remodeling of the host cell. Do all microbes follow the same path or there are any other ways for ...
2
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1answer
69 views

How can E. coli affect C. elegans expression?

Plasmids can be transferred to E. coli. These transformed E. coli can be fed to C. elegans to silence its gene expression by RNAi. How can E.coli release RNAi to C. elegans? Even if we assume E. ...
3
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1answer
60 views

Purpose of antibody wash

It is common practice after surface staining cells for flow cytometry analysis to wash the antibody out of solution before analyzing a sample. I have tried analysis with and without washing the ...
1
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1answer
325 views

Are mitochondria alive? [duplicate]

I'm working on an assignment for my IB biology class and some assistance would be highly appreciated. I've read several articles and I still haven't quite gotten the answer I'm looking for. I have to ...
0
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1answer
65 views

Why is it important to have a restriction point? (G1-S phase control)

Why have eukaryotes evolved to control G1-S phase? Surely if you could control G2-M phase very well, you will not get an excessive proliferation? Thanks for your help.
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2answers
151 views

Is there a database of cell images?

We're working on an algorithm for processing images of cells, similar to but much more basic than Cell Profiler, and we are looking for a large database of cell images to test our software. Can anyone ...
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0answers
33 views

how often do the various organ cells regenerate? [closed]

Is there an Internet source that states how often human organ cells (eyes, kidneys, liver, heart, pancreas, skin, etc.) regenerate? I'm seeking specific data for every human organ.
0
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1answer
73 views

which organelle produce glycogen phosphorylase and why

I know that Glycogen phosphorylase doesn't produce from rough endoplasmic reticulum in liver cell. But almost every proteins such as insulin receptor, serum albumin, and lysosomal enzyme have to ...
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0answers
17 views

Growth of Yeast in Different pH Mediums

Will yeast grow better in acidic, basic or neutral mediums? Why? Will the medium affect the growth of yeast? (Yeast cell membrane is semi-permeable).
2
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0answers
438 views

Why do some white blood cells have lobed nuclei?

Several types of white blood cells (eg Neutrophils) have lobed nuclei. Is this for a functional reason? I have seen people refer to structural differences in the lobes as indicative of problems, but ...
21
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5answers
4k views

Why are there no known animals with an odd number of legs?

In my 6th grade science book it is said that there are no three legged animals, and that no animal with an odd number of limbs exists. I checked Wikipedia and could confirm this: There are no ...
3
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1answer
194 views

Membrane Permeability to Pyruvate

Pyruvate seems to pass easily through the outer membrane of the mitochondrion but has difficulty entering the inner membrane (and gets in by H+ symport). I have two questions: (1) what property of ...
3
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0answers
56 views

What are the sizes of the cells that make up human hair?

The question is in the title, but I'll explain why the question arose. I'm curious about the rates that various cells in the body divide, and have found various information relating to this, but ...
4
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1answer
324 views

How can a polar molecule pass through polar channels of proteins in the cell membrane?

To transport a polar molecule through the nonpolar cell membrane, a protein with a polar channel is needed to allow it to diffuse. However, if the molecule is polar and the channel is polar, wouldn't ...
2
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0answers
33 views

How is flagellar movement controlled?

How does a cell control the movement of flagella? Both the rotatory movements and sideways movements helps the cell to move. How are these flagellar movements controlled ? It is through the regulation ...
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0answers
39 views

How to use DRAQ5 and MitoTracker CMXros dyes to stain turtle erythrocytes?

I am working on turtle species and want to use DRAQ5 and MitoTracker CMXRos to stain turtle nucleated erythrocytes. Can anyone suggest me a protocol to carry this stain out? Would the two stains ...
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1answer
54 views

Do snRNAs exit the nucleus or not?

In Molecular Biology of The Cell (Alberts, et al., 2015), it lists the various RNAs that are trafficked through the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) into the cytoplasm. The list includes snRNAs, but I ...
2
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1answer
75 views

Introductory book to cell biology

I am studying the human circulatory and respiratory systems to develop tools for automated diagnosis of disease. During the past year, I have read basic books about respiratory physiology, ...
2
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3answers
907 views

Do we consume dna, proteins of other organisms?

When we eat raw meat, e.g. chicken or fish, we are actually consuming the DNA, proteins etc. which are present in their cells. Wouldn't this affect our cell functions as this DNA might enter our ...
2
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1answer
78 views

Why do cells not spread on soft substrates?

I recently read a paper discussing how cells (primary mouse embryo fibroblasts) fail to spread and proliferate properly when plated on a soft substrate (i.e. soft PDMS pillars with stiffness k = 2.3 ...
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0answers
78 views

What is the essence of difference of how different chemicals affect the same receptor?

It is known that various chemicals can bind to the same receptor type, producing different effects. Be these chemicals agonists or antagonists, there are more variations in how they influence the ...
2
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1answer
257 views

How to understand certain protein names

I am looking for a reference to help me understand what is meant by acronyms such as : H3K9me1, H3K9me2, and H3K9Ac. I know that these are all histone proteins, but is there a general nomenclature ...
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0answers
46 views

Self assembly of Golgi Apparatus

Self assembly is not a new phenomenon to biology. Many things self assembled to provide full fledged functional unit. There are two conflicting theories about formation of Golgi Apparatus, Template ...
2
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1answer
244 views

What is a mechanical cue?

I was attending a talk related to neurogenesis. So one professor was asking a question related to biochemical cues and mechanical cues (related to signaling pathways I believe). Cue as far as I ...
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1answer
135 views

Catenation and decatenation by DNA Gyrase

Decatenation is done for the replication of DNA and why is Catenation done and is it related to Crossing over
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1answer
154 views

How will changing the concentration of a Tris buffer affect amylase enzyme activity?

For instance if you increase the amount of Tris but pH still does not change then will the enzyme activity still proceed normally? If it does change the pH will it change enzyme structure and why?
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2answers
51 views

Question about flux and changes in net flux of molecules across a membrane

I've been reading a book called Principles of Human Physiology by Stanfield 5th edition, and was reading a chapter on membrane transport when I came across a figure question which will be posted below....
3
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2answers
247 views

How does Cro protein expressed by lambda phage kill its host?

I read that the DNA segment of lambda phage integrated in host DNA could switch between lysogenic state where cI represses the expression of Cro and lytic state where Cro expression takes over and ...
0
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1answer
60 views

Why are siblings unidentical? (Which chromosome of the pair do gametes have?) [closed]

I know that a normal human cell has 23 pairs of chromosomes (total: 46). On the other hand, a gamete has only 23 chromosomes. Which chromosome does the gamete choose out of each pair? And if "One of ...
13
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1answer
873 views

Can an organism exist as a single cell but come together as multi-cellular during certain times?

I am trying to remember a particular segment from a BBC special, in which there was single cellular species. However, at certain times all the individual cells came together to form a structure, not ...
3
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1answer
4k views

Is the ringing sound in the ears caused by dying ear cells?

I was recently watching the movie "Children of Men" (great movie) by Alfonso Cuarón. Now in a certain scene, the lead actor happens to be nearby a loud explosion. Later, when he complains about the '...
2
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0answers
36 views

Can ' functional' stress 'forced upon' a cell actually cause cell mutations when they divide and reproduce?

If a group of cells are forced to go beyond their regular biological parameters that they should be under given ' healthy' functioning and while existing in these stressed states some of the cells ...
5
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2answers
116 views

Role of microvilli in cell volume regulation

Does the presence of microvilli on a cell's surface ensure that it's more resistant to cell swelling or lysis in a hypotonic solution, as compared to a normal cell?
2
votes
1answer
170 views

Staining cells for FACS at 4 degrees or ambient temperature

I'm sorting a 293 derived line. One thing that is worrisome for me is cell viability after the sort. Usually I have been staining and washing at room temperature (on the benchtop) on a nutator. I have ...
2
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0answers
26 views

Can mutation rate be increased for instance by mutagenesis targeting the DNA polymerase?

I am studying a non-cultivable bacterium living in an insect host, and I would like to generate some random mutants of this bacteria while preserving the insect. I am wondering if one way to do so ...
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1answer
270 views

Do RBCs need oxygen?

How do our red blood cells (RBCs) get oxygen? Do they even need it? They have no nucleus and no organelles, so I think they don't need it.
3
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1answer
84 views

What happens to the excess immune cells or WBC in our body?

When we have an infection our immune system produces a large amount of white blood cells (WBCs) in our body to fight against the pathogen or parasite. My question is after the immune response has ...
10
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1answer
511 views

Does the cell internal temperature changes in response to a change in external temperature?

Background Some species are homeotherm (internal temperature is not affected by a change in external temperature) and some are poikilotherm (internal temperature changes in response to external ...
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1answer
140 views

Cancer in myogenic heart cells? [duplicate]

Why cancer does not occur in myogenic heart cells? Is there any special ability in heart cells to resist cancer ?
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0answers
127 views

Jurkat single cell clonal expansion

I'm hoping to do a clonal expansion of Jurkat, expressing my construct which is currently transduced virally. From the FACS data I currently have roughly 30-40% expression in my culture but I need it ...
5
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2answers
143 views

Does polyploidy always isolate the polyploids from the diploid source population?

I am receiving conflicting information while researching polyploid speciation. On the one hand, some sources state that a polyploid can only reproduce sexually with polyploids having the same number ...
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1answer
418 views

When does DIFFUSION occur and not OSMOSIS, and the otherwise?

For example, I do know that red blood cells have both the Na+/Cl- co-transporter and Aquaporin (water channel) that allows both Na/Cl and water molecules to pass through. But why in biology textbooks ...