The study of cells: their physiological properties, structure, environmental interaction, division, life cycle, and death, as well as the organelles they contain. Also known as cytology.

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Measuring the density of surface antigens

I'm trying to get a sense of the variety of methods used for determining the number of cell surface antigens and receptors. This is notably different from determining the affinity of these surface ...
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73 views

How are lysosomes formed?

Lysosomes are irregularly shaped membrane bound organelles containing 50 different types of enzymes. But how are they formed? How are they produced??
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23 views

epitope prediction/ mapping

B-CELL EPITOPE PREDICTION Regarding this article: "Such a molecule can be synthesized or, in case of a protein, its gene can be cloned into an expression vector."----- is a particular line in ...
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127 views

Mitochondria - are they really separate organisms that once merged into eukaryotic cells?

Theoretically, mitochondria are said to be a separate organism that is concerned with its own life and its own processes. In fact, it even duplicates individually. I know a similar question is here ...
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69 views

Can (any) human cells learn?

I'm not talking about single celled organisms, but actual cells in your body. Is there any evidence that they can learn to, say, navigate an environment or avoid an aversive stimulus like an animal ...
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61 views

How to study the effect on tau protein isoforms on microtubule based transport?

From what I read, A-beta plaques inhibit microtubule based transport of mitochondria when tau protein is present in the cell. How would I be able to do a test to see if one isoform of tau is more ...
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897 views

Explanation of the terms “downstream signaling” and “upstream signaling”

In molecular biology, what's the meaning of the terms "downstream signaling" and "upstream signaling"? What's the difference between them?
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Connection between genes and pathways

I am reading about a paper about inferencing pathway information in cancer cells. Authors refer to ERBB2 as a gene and a pathway. I don't have solid biology background. What exactly means when we ...
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245 views

Homework : Sodium Potassium pump

Why does sodium-potassium pump consume about 2/3 energy of a cell ? A.maintains appropriate membrane potential B.helps in co-transport I think it should be A.
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How did viruses learn to utilize the workings of a cell?

This is my first post here, so excuse me for its simplicity. Viruses can infiltrate a cell, overtake it and multiply. It has projecting fibers whose ends are shaped as kind of a "key" to a mobile ...
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67 views

Domains in cell membrane

How is movement of proteins and lipids between different domains of cell membrane prevented? Why is the noncytosolic layer not able to do lateral movements between domains but cytosolic layer is able ...
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325 views

Will lipid molecules 'flip-flop' over a membrane without the use of an enzyme?

All of the references to this I can find refer to enzymes like Flippase making it 'easier' or 'more likely' that the translocation will occur, rather than actually make it possible. The following is ...
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Simulating Cell differentiation

I'm a computer programmer deeply interested in Biology. I wish to write a computer simulation for cell differentiation. I understand there will be seemingly impossible challenges in doing this. But ...
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Experiments in vitro vs those with dead organisms and fixated tissue

Does the term in vitro necessarily imply that the organism/organs/cells of study are dead? If not, is there an alternative latin term to refer to studies of dead biological matter ? (e.g. in ...
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288 views

How are different types of cells created from zygote?

In the process of mitosis that starts from zygote, how do different cells appear? What happens that some cells become one type and some another? For example, is there a cell that divides into a ...
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57 views

Difference between sequential and conformational epitope

Is the difference only in its structure? Like conformational epitope has 3D structure while sequential has a linear structure?(I have not studied biology since last 8 years and now I am going through ...
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41 views

What roles do cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and epoxygenase have in signal transduction? [closed]

Besides oxidizing fatty acids to form prostglandins, leukotrienes, and epoxides, what other roles do cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and epoxygenase have in signal transduction?
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66 views

Inductance in cell

In an animal cell, especially neuron and in particular its axon, while there is electrical resistance and capacitance mechanism in the cell, which play essential roles in the cable theory model of ...
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193 views

How do some plants grow in salt water, while others die?

My question is basically out of curiosity and comes from observing how certain plants (such as mangroves or salt cedar) can grow in seawater. If this gives the plant an advantage, why haven't all ...
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267 views

What kind of a microscope do I need to see cell organelles?

I would like to study cells and looking for a microscope that would allow me to see: groups of cells individual cell cells organelles I would like to target insects and mammal tissue. I would be ...
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49 views

Fusion of neuron with a S phase cell

There was some experiment in which a S phase cell was fused with other cell and the other cell also began to replicate DNA. Would the same happen if fused with nerve cell ? Why or why not?
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How is the mRNA transported out of the endoplasmic reticulum?

In eukaryotes the nuclear envelope is continuous with the ER, so what helps it out of that?
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How do plant cell divide without centrioles?

Most plants do not have centrioles , so who does their function ?
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Why did Fair Meiosis evolve?

How and why did Fair Meiosis evolve? I can hardly think that it provided a fitness advantage to the individual carrying the mutation. Why would it? Or did it evolve through lineage selection? Or was ...
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fibroblast cells and fibers

I am interested in fibroblast cells in human arteries. Here are the things that I am not clear at the moment and I could not find any answer from the literature: What are the dimensions of these ...
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What is the title of Darwin's paper on cellular structure?

I read somewhere that Darwin wrote a paper that dealt with cellular structure, but I've been unable to find the title or contents of the paper because Darwin wrote such a volume of material. What is ...
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How does the cell regulate different metabolic pathways?

I heard somewhere that cells use different nucleosides bound to triphosphates e.g. ATP, GTP, CTP and other modified compounds: NADH, NADPH to distinguish between different metabolic pathways and so ...
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39 views

Does the cellular response to every receptor work the same way?

I heard somewhere that activating any receptor results in the same intracellular response (signaling) which involves NF-κB. If that is true, I hardly understand how the cells distinguish between ...
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121 views

Active & passive transport question

If an element, ion or molecule is found in a cell is it possible to tell which method of transport was used? for example if a hydrogen or sodium ion was found in the cell could you tell if it got ...
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47 views

What is the role of lamellar bodies in lung cells?

Lamellar bodies have been found to be secreted in lung cells many of their associated proteins have been identified. What is the current consensus or research on the function that these lamellar ...
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42 views

Regarding signalling pathways

Do all signalling pathways have something that can inhibit them? If the signal pathway is benefitial and it is inhibited would the inhibitor be caused by a biological problem? Are all inhibitors ...
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76 views

What cells don't have a primary cilium?

It is often stated that most cells in the human body have a primary cilium. Which ones don't? For which cells is it unknown?
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Why are some scorpion species fluorescent under UV light?

It's known for some scorpion species such as Pandinus imperator, Heterometrus Petersii etc. to be shining under UV light. That makes them easier to capture and collect by humans. Is there any ...
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88 views

Are cell lines potentially dangerous?

More specifically, if a human subject was exposed to, say, a human cancerous cell line (via intravenous injection or through an open wound, for example), is it possible that they would develop any ...
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Solubility of Forskolin in ethanol

I am interested in using forskolin in cell culture medium. Does anyone know how to make solution of 10 microM forskolin in 5% ethanol or less. I would like to avoid using DMSO as a solvent. Thank you. ...
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51 views

Exotic Cell Shapes

As far as I know, plant cell shapes are a difficult thing to pin down. However plant cells have cell walls and so can be very rigid. However the only plant cells I've seen have been either block ...
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69 views

Autophagy in eukaryotic cells

What is autophagy? How and under which circumstances is it used by the cell? I believe The reason for autophagy is some kind of recycling, am I right? But why does it occur in infections?
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How do I get recombinant proteins into the nucleus of mammal cells?

I know that there are Nuclear Localisation Sequencenes (NLS). They can be taken from endogenous or viral proteins and fused to the N or C terminus of my recombinant protein. Which is the best one? ...
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30 views

Prevent biofilm formation on moist surfaces

I have an indoor fountain with lots of water. What are the most common microorganisms in this kind of moist environment, and what are the standard way to prevent biofilm formation by them? I thought ...
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50 views

What proportion of salt in water would make it not dehydrate nor hydrate someone?

Drinking sea water can be deadly as it contains too much salt, basically de-hydrating the body. Normal tap water contains little salt and is good for re-hydration. My question: How much salt needs to ...
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36 views

What does the term 'epitope mapping' mean? [closed]

Epitope mapping means identifying the binding site of antibodies on the target antigen. This means that the site to be identified is part of the antigen and not antibody, am I right?
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32 views

What can thrombosis lead to?

I am thinking this question. Thrombosis can result in organisation of thrombus, sepsis thromboembolism, fibrinoid swelling adiposity. I fibrinoid swelling (edema) (4) can occur. Also, I think (3) ...
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150 views

Which of the cell types commonly found in mammals has the greatest number of mitochondria?

This is basically a fun question, inspired by this answer on scifi.se. So, which cell type will have the greatest number of mitochondria? Obviously, I am talking about wild type, healthy individuals ...
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203 views

Image Processing Suite for bacterial microscopy: Schnitzcells or MicrobeTracker?

I am looking to start doing some work tracking the size and growth of individual bacterial cells in the microscope. In order to analyze the images I need software that can segment the cells, ...
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57 views

Critical pO2 threshold for cell division?

I'm a physicist asking questions on an aspect of cellular metabolism, so excuse my biological ignorance! Hypoxia is a frequent complication of certain tumour types, and has quite an implication for ...
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110 views

Coiling of chromatids during cell division

What is exactly coiling of chromosomes? I just heard about the names i.e paranemic, plectonemic, orthostichious, anorthospiral. I have ecaxtly no idea of what phenomenon is this. Also what type of ...
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How to use mechanical microstrainer to extract tissue proteins from human? [closed]

Background: There are many methods to extract proteins form human tissues out there. The majority of them use an extraction buffer containing variable concentrations of detergents and protease ...
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Example(s) of reduced rate of mitotic progression?

Most species complete mitosis, and in particular the process of chromosome condensation, rather quickly, in a matter of minutes. Are there any known species that undergo mitoses with substantially ...
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46 views

Onset of Autophagy

Fasting and Intermittent Fasting (IF) have been proven to start autophagy (cellular self-digestion). How long does the average man and woman have to wait for autophagy to begin? Does diet prior to ...
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Similarities Between Cells?

Which of the following are usually identical between a lung cell and a brain cell, from the same person, assuming that they are normal (non-cancerous) cells? Circle your choice(s). ...