The study of cells: their physiological properties, structure, environmental interaction, division, life cycle, and death, as well as the organelles they contain. Also known as cytology.

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Types of fermentation?

I read about several rarer forms of fermentation such as ABE, and heterolactic. What is the full list of all known types of fermentation, and what are the differences between them?
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Structure of Cell

Are cells spheres or ovals/circles bound by phospholipidbilayer? If they are spherical how are we able to see the nucleus through the phospholipid bilayer under a microscope?
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How is CO2 related to acidity?

In a plant cell why does increase in concentration of CO2 increase the acidity of the cell sap. Thank you
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mRNA extraction from mice ears.

I am trying to extract RNA from mice ears and for some reason I don't have RNA when I perform the electrophoresis. I directly cut the ears and I put it in a tube with a bead and trizol. then I place ...
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What is our skin made up of?

Again, it is a basic question. What is our skin made up of? is it made up of many cells arranged in a systematic way or is it just like any layer say of a book?? what is the difference? where is the ...
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Can the activity of bacteria be influenced by magnetism?

Some organisms are tuning their direction on a magnetic field. But are bacteria also reacting on magnetic fields and can it be used in health therapie as a kind of 'antibiotic'?
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48 views

What causes swelling after impact?

Why does the head swell after getting hit by something hard? What is the liquid that forms after impact?
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107 views

Why did multicellular organisms evolve when a single cell can survive on its own? [duplicate]

Since unicellular organisms can survive, why would there be evolution of multicellular organisms?
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1answer
46 views

What do proton pump inhibitors do?

I know that sodium azide and 2,4-DNPH inhibit proton pumps. The azide is called an inhibitor and 2,4-DNP is called uncoupler. I want to know what's the difference between the mechanisms of action of ...
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84 views

In the video, “Inner Life of a Cell”, what's the empty space between the molecules?

In the video, ["Inner Life of a Cell"][1,] there's a lot of empty space between the proteins. Is it just a simplification (i.e. they omit smaller molecules)? If so, what are the smaller molecules ...
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30 views

Normal cell diffusion in normal organism?

We know, that cancer cell can travel across an organism. Is this ABSOLUTELY impossible for NORMAL cells? For example, is it EXACTLY ZERO probability to find some bone cells inside liver or some skin ...
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Blebbistatin effect on vesicles

Blebbistatin is a drug that specifically inhibits the assembly of myosin in the cytoskeleton. What effect would you expect blebbistatin to have on intracellular vesicles? ...
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1answer
38 views

Why did eukaryotic cells develop? [on hold]

If eukaryotic cells can survive in extreme conditions, then why are their still prokaryotic organisms?
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Could a single cell be brought to life?

If a scientist is observing a single cell under a microscope, and then realizes that the cell has died, is it possible to bring that dead cell back to life? For my inquiry, let's assume that the ...
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Is it true that human cells grow in levorotation? [on hold]

I remember reading this in a popular science magazine, some 20 years ago: that in most of the living organisms, cells grow in levorotation and very few grow in dextrorotation. That means, the ...
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Is it possible to make the human cells totipotent? [closed]

we all know humans are not capable of regenerating from a single cell. Is there any possibility that we can make cells totipotent?
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1answer
27 views

ADCs: by what mechanism are antibodies internalised [closed]

I read that ADCs (Antibody-Drug Conjugates) act by a -mab for a particular target being bonded to a cytotoxic compound. From my high-school-with-crayons knowledge of antibodies, however, one part of ...
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26 views

Bacteria surviving a β-lactam antibiotic

What changes can occur in the cell wall of a bacteria for it to survive a β-lactam antibiotic? I think that because a bacteria possesses peptidoglycan in its cell wall, they are β-lactam sensitive, ...
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21 views

What percent of cells are lysed when I make my smoothie?

This is an entirely irreverent question, but it does concern biology. I'm a physicist by training so I like to be able to estimate order of magnitude. I made a smoothie the other day with milk, ...
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1answer
28 views

How does symbiogenesis explain reproduction of organelles along with the cell?

Symbiogenesis is an evolutionary theory that says that prokaryotes eventually evolved into eukaryotes (having multiple organelles and better structure) by forming symbiotic relationships with other ...
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1answer
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Advantage of GCPRs over RTKs or other receptor protein kinases

My book lists two important differences between GCPRs and receptor protein kinases: GCPRs do not directly activate a signal transduction pathway. It only does so indirectly, via a G protein. On the ...
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2answers
33 views

Growth factors vs. mitogens

According to Campbell Biology, A growth factor is a protein released by certain cells that stimulates other cells to divide. and according to Wikipedia, A mitogen is a chemical substance ...
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57 views

Density of cells in human tissues?

Where can I find values, or estimates, of the density of cells in human tissues? Maybe an overall estimate, or distinct values for distinct tissues? Or maybe not human, but mammal tissues (which ...
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1answer
134 views

Difference between protein channels, protein carriers and protein pumps?

I'm revising for my biology exam and I don't fully comprehend the difference between protein channels, carriers and pumps. I know that: Protein channels do not require ATP (passive transport) The ...
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Vitamin E Production and Sun Light [closed]

Do animals with fur need sunlight to produce vitamin E? It it necessary to have sunlight in humans to make it?
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243 views

How many centrioles/basal bodies are there in multi-ciliated cells throughout the cell cycle?

I thought there were only two centrioles per cell, that convert to the basal body at some point during the cell cycle. I also thought there's one basal body per cilium, so I'm not clear on where the ...
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1answer
54 views

HOw are AMP's “recharged” to become ATP's in a cell?

I understand that after the translation stage of ribosomal protein synthesis, tRNA molecules are floating in the cytoplasm without attached amino acids until they find the correct aminoacyl tRNA ...
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1answer
62 views

Which step in endocytosis requires ATP?

Everybody seems to agree that endocytosis is an energy-using process, and as such requires ATP hydrolysis. However, which particular step requires it? More precisely, which 'molecular machine' ...
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Is there a karyotype database for human cell lines?

I'm looking for the karyotype of a specific cell line. Some karyotype are well known, such as HeLa or some carcinomas, but some are very hard to find, such as LG2 (B cells). Is there a database ...
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25 views

How does the drug MBC effect the depolymerization of microtubules in eukaryotic cells?

I have tried to look for the mechanism of how methyl benzimidazol-2-yl-carbamate affects microtubules in eukaryotes, but what I found wasn't very useful: Quilan et al 1980 assert that it acts by ...
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1answer
52 views

How difficult is it to make a shRNA/miRNA/siRNA to silence/knockdown NaV1.7 voltage gated sodium channels in humans?

There have been various research projects that experimented with shRNA/miRNA/siRNA to specifically silence/knockdown NaV1.7 voltage gated sodium channels in small animals like rats & guinea pigs. ...
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Do you know of any scratch assay video databases?

It would be of great help for a statistical work we have been asked to carry out at our University. Thank you very much in advance.
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48 views

Do snRNAs exit the nucleus or not?

In Molecular Biology of The Cell (Alberts, et al., 2015), it lists the various RNAs that are trafficked through the Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) into the cytoplasm. The list includes snRNAs, but I ...
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2answers
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At any given moment, how much energy is stored in the human body as ATP?

At any given moment, approximately how much energy is stored in the human body as ATP in the ADP-P-bond? This of course depends on what type of cell it is and the activity of the individual in ...
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1answer
40 views

Can a cell start a mitosis if it lacks energy or molecules to complete it?

I'm wondering whether a cell can start a mitosis if it lack molecules or energy to fully complete it. From what I'm reading on wikipedia the cell passes most of its time in the interphase in which the ...
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31 views

What is the purpose of requiring two separate binding systems for the antibody response?

I've read that in most cases, B-cell activation requires helper T-cells. This requires antigen binding by both antibodies and T-cell receptors, using two different antigen-binding proteins, ...
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At which end does polymerization of microtubules occur?

My book says that polymerization and depolumerization of microtubules occurs on the + end however, I've found a note that says that depolymerization occurs on the - end. I need help please :) thank ...
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47 views

Is HSV-vector-mediated miRNA expression in dorsal root ganglia stable?

My question is on the following article: "Reduction of voltage gated sodium channel protein in DRG by vector mediated miRNA reduces pain in rats with painful diabetic neuropathy" My question is, do ...
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Effects of pH vs membrane potential within a cell? [closed]

How are these two concepts related? Does changing each result in the same effects? As in: what kind of reactions/processes would be affected if we changed the pH within a cell? Would the results ...
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How was gene therapy able to CURE some diseases (I guess on cells that do NOT regenerate)?

Here's where I'm getting confused... I thought that gene therapy, when done on target cells that regenerate themselves constantly, can be effective for a limited time only (aka. The achieved effect ...
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In cell division, are daughter cells identical?

I understand that after a cell replicates, there will be two daughter cells instead of one. But wouldn't one of them be the old cell that created the second one? The old cell having gone through G0, ...
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Constant or variable number of chiasmata during recombination?

During recombination, is the number of chiasmata consistent for each gamete and are the chiasmata regions consistent within a single organism?
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Do human somatic cells have 46 chromosomes all the time?

As far as I know, a human somatic cell has the cell cycle: Interphase and Replication (mitosis). In interphase the cell has 2 growth phases (G1 + G2) and a synthesis one (S phase being in between G1 ...
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How sorbitol treatment selects ring stage of plasmodium falciparum

I would like to know the basic chemistry behind ring stage selection by sorbitol. Sorbitol is used for Synchronising the plasmodium culture in ring stage. How the chemical retains or selects ring ...
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Eukaryotes and multicellulars [duplicate]

If eukaryotes can form multicellular bodies, why are all eukaryotes not multicellular? eg amoeba and other protists.
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Do chromosomes uncoil in interphase II

During interphase II, there is no S phase in which DNA replicates. However, in this stage, do the chromosomes remain wound? Or have they unwound into chromatin form, and recondense during prophase II? ...
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Are nucleotides at the ends of DNA stripped on aging?

I had the following understanding (now after reading a popular science article seeming wrong understanding): DNA in (regular) cells (in human and some other organisms) are protected by telomers. ...