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What triggers the formation of biofilm? [closed]

How does a bacterial biofilm form? In general, not specific to a certain industry or type of surface. I know how it forms; I understand reversible attachment, irreversible attachment, growth, ...
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1answer
28 views

Apoptosis vs necroptosis

I understand that apoptosis and necroptosis share the same upper part of the pathway, but I cannot seem to distinguish when is each one activated? From my readings, it seems that when procaspases 8 or ...
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2answers
24 views

How does the cell regulate different metabolic pathways?

I heard somewhere that cells use different nucleosides bound to triphosphates e.g. ATP, GTP, CTP and other modified compounds: NADH, NADPH to distinguish between different metabolic pathways and so ...
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1answer
32 views

Does the cellular response to every receptor work the same way?

I heard somewhere that activating any receptor results in the same intracellular response (signaling) which involves NF-κB. If that is true, I hardly understand how the cells distinguish between ...
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2answers
26 views

Localization of Protein Kinase-A

Is protein kinase-A located in the cytosol/cytoplasm of cells or in the plasma membrane? Also, is it considered a receptor molecule since it is dependent on cAMP? Any and all help is appreciated. ...
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1answer
28 views

What's the duration between the binding of adrenaline to β-AR and the first translated protein?

Binding of adrenaline (epinephrine) to the β-Adrenergic receptor leads to formation of cAMP (via G protein activation), activation of protein kinase A and subsequently to the expression of specific ...
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1answer
69 views

What is the functional significance of the difference in cardiolipin/cholesterol ratio in different membranes?

I have read somewhere that the plasma membrane has little cardiolipin but excess cholesterol whereas the inner mitochondrial membrane is rich in cardiolipin and has little cholesterol.I just wanted to ...
2
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1answer
42 views

Why do oncogenes show genetic dominance?

As we know that tumor suppressor gene causes cancer only when both the alleles are recessive in nature.But in case of oncogenes if only one allele is dominant it can cause cancer.Why in case of ...
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2answers
148 views

Effect of steroid hormone on specific cells?

As steroid hormones can pass through the plasma membrane by simple diffusion because they are lipid derived hormones, it means that they are capable of passing through every cell of our body, BUT why ...
2
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1answer
41 views

Regarding signalling pathways

Do all signalling pathways have something that can inhibit them? If the signal pathway is benefitial and it is inhibited would the inhibitor be caused by a biological problem? Are all inhibitors ...
4
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1answer
127 views

which signalling pathway is involved in cancer?

Columnar epithelial cells from the colonic mucosa are studied to identify abnormalities in cell signaling pathways. Abnormal epithelial cells from colonic adenocarcinoma are shown to have a mutation ...
4
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2answers
154 views

Effect of testosterone hormone on cell signalling and behaviour?

A steroid, testosterone was injected in female body which led to development of secondary sexual characters but these characters were not developed over night (Response was very slow). What could be ...
9
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2answers
377 views

Why does Hunger lead to the aggressive behavior?

I have observed that frequently when people are hungry; they tend to get angry more easily on pointless issues. Does this mean that our fight or flight response is more active when a person is hungry? ...
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4answers
171 views

Specificity of Protein Kinases in Signaling Pathways..?

In most of the signaling pathways the activated receptor when activates Protein Kinase through the action of secondary messenger, then these protein kinases almost always phosphorylate on the specific ...
2
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1answer
69 views

Can (any) human cells learn?

I'm not talking about single celled organisms, but actual cells in your body. Is there any evidence that they can learn to, say, navigate an environment or avoid an aversive stimulus like an animal ...
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1answer
136 views

How do GPCRs transmit a signal across the plasma membrane?

How do G-coupled protein receptors (GPCR) transmit signals through the plasma membrane? Links containing information about this and pictures will be very helpful.
1
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1answer
29 views

Why can't intermediate filaments be used as tracks by motor proteins?

A motor protein like kinesin-1 cannot use an IF as a track because it lacks polarity. Can someone elaborate on this answer?
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1answer
70 views

Meaning of “auto” in trans autophosphorylation?

Why this process called "auto"? Is it because each tyrosine kinase receptor subunit of the RTK dimer has the ability to phosphorylate tyrosine or other amino acid residue present in other subunit of ...
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1answer
124 views

Transverse diffusion of lipids in red blood cells

The membrane of a human erythrocyte has polarity: Phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine are predominantly on the inner side. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin are predominantly on the ...
6
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4answers
81 views

Exocytosis of mast cell secretory granules

I've been doing a bit of reading about mast cell degranulation and have become thoroughly lost while trying to understand how the secretory granules are actually secreted. I understand that there are ...
5
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2answers
284 views

Signaling through G protein Coupled Receptors?

There are two different cell lines but we do not know that these cell lines have Gs or Gi proteins, associated with their G-protein coupled receptors. If we wants to know about this. Can we design a ...
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1answer
32 views

Modern research or study on patterns in nerve signals

I am trying to find any recent study on pattern recognition in nerve signals. It does not really matter the part of the body where the research is focused on. It can be anything from studying activity ...
3
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1answer
65 views

Amino acid profile of GPCRs

You are studying cellular signalling through a newly identified GPCR. Specifically you’re working on a pair of newly identified GPCRs, GPCR-A and GPCR-B. Each binds the same small ligand, but ...
3
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1answer
50 views

Significance of lipids in biological membranes…?

Membranes are specifically designed by lipids to maintain internal hydrophilic environment in narrow range.There are hydrophobic amino acids among naturally occurring 20 amino acids and as well as ...
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1answer
55 views

Bilayer synthesis? [closed]

If we want to design a bilayer from Myristic acid (14 carbon fatty acid). The average bond length between C-C is 1.5 A. What will be average thickness of the membrane? Edited to include the OP ...
2
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1answer
65 views

Structure of biological membranes?

Integral membrane proteins have functional asymmetry i.e. they have two different domains of proteins performing different functions. these proteins have Tyr and Trp amino acid residues at the ...
2
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2answers
794 views

Explanation of the terms “downstream signaling” and “upstream signaling”

In molecular biology, what's the meaning of the terms "downstream signaling" and "upstream signaling"? What's the difference between them?
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0answers
39 views

The roles of RhoA, Rac and Cdc42 in cadherin signalling

I'm a little confused over the roles of RhoA, Rac and Cdc42. From this text it would seem that when cadherins form a junction with one another RhoA is inhibited, whilst Cdc42 and Rac is activated. ...
1
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1answer
71 views

What is a phospho-protein binding domain?

Is this just a domain that binds proteins that have been phosphorylated? And it mediates signalling between an activated/phosphorylated protein? How is this significant with BRCA1?
1
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0answers
24 views

Temporal effects on pathways?

I was wondering whether or not there exist certain pathways that are triggered by a temporal signal. We're almost at the winter solstice now. Does animal or plant function involve signals that are ...
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0answers
14 views

histamine inter-cellular and cytoplasmic binding site

I noticed that HRH (histamine receptor) has an inter-cellular and cytoplasmic binding site of anti-histamines which are equal in binding energy. Does anyone know what is the function of the well ...
2
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1answer
68 views

Autophagy in eukaryotic cells

What is autophagy? How and under which circumstances is it used by the cell? I believe The reason for autophagy is some kind of recycling, am I right? But why does it occur in infections?
6
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1answer
535 views

Cat purring: What are some possible underlying mechanisms behind purring and bone remodeling and formation?

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=why-do-cats-purr The article above says that cats purr mostly when they're wounded or under duress. They hypothesis that cats purring leads to ...
1
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1answer
142 views

How do axon terminals report to the soma?

It is important to bear in mind that the distance between a neuron's axon terminal and its soma can be extensive, up to about 1m in the human body. The fastest transport along the axon is 400mm/day ...
4
votes
2answers
378 views

Question about cell signaling pathways (RTK, Jak-Stat, SMAD, etc)

I am in an embryology course right now and we've just started covering cell-cell communication in development. We were talking about the roles of the various cadherins and their discoveries but we got ...
6
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1answer
243 views

Models of quorum sensing for multi-agent systems

Quorum sensing is a system of stimulus and responses correlated to population density that is used by bacteria to coordinate gene-expression. I am looking for a simple computational/mathematical model ...