The process in which energy is liberated from organic molecules producing ATP.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

4
votes
2answers
6k views

Is there an evolutionary reason for the 5 electron transport complexes in plants and animals?

The electron transport chains of both the light reactions of photosynthesis (in plants) and oxidative phosphorylation (in animals) both contain 5 complexes including ATP synthase, as shown below. ...
11
votes
1answer
2k views

Do fish break a water molecule to absorb oxygen?

How do fish separate oxygen from H20 & consume it? Do they break the water molecule and absorb the oxygen only?
15
votes
1answer
4k views

Given ATP synthase's structure, how can 3.33 protons ultimately synthesize one and only one ATP?

I am familiar with the structure and function of ATP synthase, but one small detail doesn't seem to make sense. It also happens to be a detail that seems very hard to express. Depending on the ...
5
votes
1answer
652 views

Why does muscle tissue have relatively constant AMP + ADP + AMP?

I was going over slides of energy expenditure in muscle cells. It mentions that in muscle tissue, the cell's energy charge ([ATP] / [AMP]) is the principle factor controlling glycolytic activity, and ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

Is there a relationship between efficiency of cellular metabolism and warm-blooded-ness?

My BIO 101 book states that when human cells convert glucose to ATP, the process is only approx 35% efficient, and much of the potential energy is lost as heat. However, that heat is useful to us in ...
12
votes
1answer
1k views

Why do neurons die so quickly (relative to other cells) when deprived of oxygen?

This question could be considered a follow-up question to Why is a lack of oxygen fatal to cells?, although the top answer there does not address why damage starts to pop in. The answer says this: ...
16
votes
1answer
716 views

How fast does the rotor in ATP synthase spin?

I'm sure the exact frequency varies, but does anyone know roughly how many revolutions per minute / second the rotating center part makes?
10
votes
2answers
813 views

Could hydrogen replace oxygen in cellular respiration?

I was wondering what oxygen actually does in the body. I have seen a few answers to other questions that involve the electron chain and I am really not sure what that is. So I was wondering what ...
7
votes
2answers
823 views

What effect does ambient temperature have on the cardiovascular system?

I am sorry if this is not appropriate for this site, but I think it fits so I am asking it here: I went for a run yesterday, and it was about -8⁰C. I was wearing a couple pairs of shorts, a t-shirt ...
19
votes
3answers
81k views

NADH vs. NADPH: Where is each one used and why that instead of the other?

I know NADH is used in cellular respiration and NADPH is used in photosynthesis. What difference does the phosphate group make that the same one isn't or can't be used for both? Is there a greater ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

How does the enzyme ATP Synthase use a proton concentration gradient to make ATP?

I understand what the enzyme ATP synthase does, but I'm not exactly sure how it does it. I've heard that it uses rotary catalysis, but how exactly does this work? How is the energy from the H+ ion ...
5
votes
1answer
357 views

What is the benefit for cells having the ATP production regulated in mitochondria compared to being from the nucleus?

Mitochondria have their own DNA and appear to be loosely connected to the nucleus and it role. Why are the functions of mitochondria not in the nucleus? Why doesn't the nucleus control the ...
12
votes
2answers
692 views

Do mitochondria simply automatically convert glucose to ATP?

I wonder whether there is any intelligent decision-making in mitochondria in the timing of their operation. Do they simply begin ATP production as soon as the correct reactants are present? Or, ...
14
votes
4answers
3k views

Where is the line between Anaerobic and Aerobic?

I am well aware of traditional anaerobic respiration (lactic acid or alcohol produced - no Krebs cycle) and traditional aerobic respiration (O2 is used at the end of the Citric acid cycle). I am ...
11
votes
2answers
10k views

Why is a lack of oxygen fatal to cells?

In animals temporary anaerobic respiration leads to the breakdown of the pyruvate formed by glycolysis into lactate. The buildup of lactate in the bloodstream is accompanied by a large number of ...
33
votes
5answers
9k views

What does the human body use oxygen for besides the final electron acceptor in the electron transport chain?

My biology teachers never explained why animals need to breathe oxygen, just that we organisms die if we don't get oxygen for too long. Maybe one of them happened to mention that its used to make ATP. ...