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4
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1answer
62 views

How pain can stimulate the vagus nerve

I'm trying to find out why a prompt, severe, short pain is causing a stimulation of the vagus nerve. What could the physiological explanation be? Is that because the pain is triggering the ...
5
votes
2answers
77 views

How long can the brain survive during ongoing cardiac arrest?

There was this interesting discussion on CPR and defib in response to the question "Why can't we defibrillate the heart within 1 minute after ventricular fibrillation by electroshock?". Now I was ...
3
votes
1answer
105 views

Specific location where nerves converge

I'm looking for the "earliest" specific site where the 3 following nerves' sensory signals "converge": Trigeminal nerve Median nerve Superficial peroneal nerve By "earliest", I really mean the ...
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votes
0answers
99 views

Physiologically, how can stress/anxiety cause neuropathy?

According to the Mayo Clinic, stress/anxiety can cause "pins and needles" (neuropathy) sensations all over the body. But how can this be? My understanding of the sensory pathway is that sensory ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Can signals travel “backwards” in the sensory pathway?

My understanding of the "sensory pathway" is that its a linear, directional pipeline as follows: Nerves (fire various signals depending on the type of sensors they are) Fibers (transmit signals from ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

Anatomy of nervous system's sensory pathways

When I touch my hand on a hot stove, I feel pain. I'm interested in knowing all the main "endpoints" (components/parts of the body) that are involved in relaying this pain signal. As I understand it ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

How and where do nerves share pathways to the brain?

I am interested in understanding how pain receptors send signals to the somatosensory cortex (the part of the brain that registers various nerve signals such as pain, presure, temperatures, etc). ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

What specific sensory nerves act as receptors for “pins and needles” (neuropathy)?

According to this excellent answer, the difference between "pain" and "pins and needles" (neuropathy) is that different receptors (sensory nerves) trigger in reaction to different stimuli. Different ...
4
votes
0answers
84 views

Long-term effects of antihistamines on mind and CNS [closed]

Can maybe someone share knowledge or guesses on the following questions: Does the prolonged use of antihistamines cause long-term effects on mind or CNS? Are there any known evidences of their ...
0
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0answers
44 views

Are ipratropium and tolterodine parasympatholytic?

They are nonselective cholinoblockers and antimuscarinic. Other cholinoblockers of parasympaticus, which I know, are parasympatholytic such as atropine, butylscopolamine, trihexyphenidyl, titropium ...
3
votes
3answers
186 views

Do skull bones have pain nerves (nociceptors)?

I recently attended an awake brain surgery for deep brain stimulation and it seemed to me that only the skin surrounding the drilled hole got local anaesthesia. I know that the brain itself does not ...
3
votes
2answers
154 views

How is information sent from limbs to the brain exactly?

Say you have a needle, and you poke a very specific area on your left thumb. A signal gets sent from that nerve up your spine and into your brain. How does the brain know exactly where this signal ...
3
votes
1answer
72 views

Biological advantage of electric synapses

Electric synapses are synapses that do not process information but simply foward one action potential from one neuron to the next. There are no neurotransmitters, no inhibitory and exitatory ...