A single piece of DNA coiled and organized along with RNA and proteins found in the cell.

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Why is polyploidy lethal for some organisms while for others is not?

Polyploidy is the multiplication of number of chromosomal sets from 2n to 3n (triploidy), 4n (tetraploidy) and so on. It is quite common in plants, for example many crops like wheat or Brassica forms. ...
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2k views

Is there an advantage to linear chromosomes?

The DNA copying enzymes have a hard time working to the end of a chromosome. For circular chromosomes this is not a problem, since there is not a sharp 'end'. However, for a linear chromosome, without ...
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1answer
285 views

Do single crossovers occur in circular polynucleotides?

Single crossovers in circular pieces of DNA do not seem to be a big topic, because if they happened, they would lead to a kind of combined chromosome with two inner strands and one large outer strand. ...
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2k views

Are human chromosomes connected or separate molecules?

Do the 46 human chromosomes form a single unbroken DNA helix? Or is it rather that a human's genome consists of 46 disconnected helices? If it is the former, does the common numbering scheme for ...
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1answer
744 views

Does every mitochondrion in a cell contain the same DNA?

I know that mitochondria of eukaryotes have their own DNA, more similar to that of bacteria than to the rest of the cell's DNA. I also know that a cell can have plenty of mitochondria, and I ...
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61 views

Are recessive, deleterious alleles less common on the X chromosome than the autosomes in humans?

As there is a potential for them to be more readily purged in hemizygous males (and in cell lineages in females with the deleterious-allele-bearing chromosome activated), I would expect the frequency ...
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4answers
463 views

Chromosomes are of different size but why do all chromosomes have similar GC percentage?

When I browsed NCBI I saw a pattern: even if the chromosome sizes, number of genes, and number of proteins are different, GC% in chromosomes tend to be similar. The examples are linked below. Yeast, ...
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620 views

Finding the number of chromosomes of an organism

For a school project I need to find the number of chromosomes of an organism (specifically the adelie penguin, Pygoscelis adeliae). After several internet searches and a look through the encyclopedia ...
6
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1answer
132 views

Number of spindle fibres during Metaphase?

During metaphase, the chromosomes are arranged on the equatorial plate and are attached to spindle fibres. After S phase, can the cell be said to attain the configuration of 4n? Also, during ...
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1answer
148 views

Why was polyploidy not lethal in certain octodontid rodents?

As discussed in Why is polyploidy lethal for some organisms while for others is not?, polyploidy is normally lethal in mammals. However, two species of Octodontidae (South American rodents), are ...
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1answer
375 views

What phenotypes can arise from gender-related aneuploidy?

Humans normally have 46 chromosomes (two copies - one from each parent - of each of the 24 chromosomes: [1:22] + [XX or XY]). Aneuploidy is an abnormal number of chromosomes - Down's syndromes is an ...
4
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1answer
90 views

Does DNA analysis allow determining amount of chromosomes?

Nowadays it is possible to sequence the DNA of extinct species, such as the Neanderthals, the Denisovans, and others. Is it possible to determine, solely from the sequenced DNA or from known bone ...
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826 views

Chromosome 2 fusion?

I read this article by Jeffrey Tomkins and Jerry Bergman claiming to debunk chromosome 2 fusion. Is there anything wrong with these conclusions? " 1.The reputed fusion site is located in a ...
4
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1answer
50 views

Is there a link between autoimmune diseases and X-chromosome inactivation?

I was reading about the necessity of niche formations to adequate development of blood progenitors and this idea reminded me of the patchy inactivation of the X chromosome which followed that maybe, ...
4
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4answers
106 views

Collective name for the X- and Z-chromosomes

Chromosomes are grouped as sex chromosomes or autosomes, with the X, Y, Z and W all falling in to the former category. The Z and X are present both in the homogametic and heterogametic sexes, and the ...
4
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1answer
44 views

Definition of “structural underdominance”?

In Stathos and Fishman (2014), the authors refer to the concept of structural underdominance. The first time they mention it is in the first paragraph of the second page (left column) and the term is ...
4
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1answer
160 views

How does a tiger have stripes?

A vague question, but let me try to explain. My friend explained to me that in females, some cells use one X chromosome, while all others use the other X chromosome. This can result in some ...
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1answer
56 views

What value type would a chromosome position be in a database or form?

I wanted to create a tool for some fields like SIFT, Phenotype, etc..so for example I know Phenotype will have "Text" values or SIFT will have some determined values from a drop down list...but what ...
4
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1answer
52 views

X-inactivation in ovaries

Background In all eutherian (mammals excluding the marsupials), the female (who is $XX$ for the pair of sexual chromosomes) inactivates one of her $X$. This is called dosage compensation. This ...
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3answers
6k views

Evolutionarily speaking, why do humans have 46 chromosomes

In humans, each cell normally contains 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46. Monkeys, chimpanzees, and Apes have 24 pairs (twenty-four pairs), for a total of 48. What caused humans to have 46? ...
3
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2answers
149 views

Is it possible to correctly identify presence of Y chromosome with external physical test only?

I asked a question related to the third sex, and I came to know that its always possible to categorize a human to male or female with presence of Y chromosome. Now, I have another question. Is there ...
3
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1answer
265 views

How much DNA of Albert Einstein is recoverable?

Since there seem to be five biological descendants of Albert Einstein, and the original chromosomes of him distributed among them ... Is it possible to recover enough DNA of an individual from his ...
3
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1answer
125 views

What is the most genetically simple organism except viruses?

What is the most genetically simple organism (except viruses) on this planet? By simple I mean the least number of genes.
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2answers
127 views

Question about Autosomal Recessive Alleles

I had a homework question that I could not figure out. It states: A woman has cystic fibrosis in her family and did not want to have a child that suffered from the disease. She and her spouse ...
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2answers
304 views

How was the Huntington's disease gene's location found?

I read in the book "Why we get sick." by Nesse and Williams that: Steady detective work and fabulous luck have enabled geneticists to pinpoint the Huntington's gene on the short arm of ...
3
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1answer
86 views

Why is Turner syndrome rarer than Klinefelter syndrome?

Turner syndrome occurs in 1-1000 to 1-5000 females, and Klinefelter syndrome occurs in 1-500 to 1-1000 males. Why is Turner so rare even though they both are caused basically by the same mechanism?
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1answer
564 views

Examples of animals with different number of chromosomes that can interbreed?

When I was first started to write this question, I wanted to know how species evolve to have a different chromosomal arrangement, such as having two pairs of chromosomes instead of one? However, I ...
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1answer
147 views

What are centromeres *really*?

I've gathered that a centromere is a a region* where the DNA is bundles up even tighter (around protein different to Histone) and chromatids are 'joined'. However I'm still mostly in the dark ...
3
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1answer
67 views

How can chromatin state be measured?

I have some RNA-Seq data and I'd like to align it to the physical genome and see which sections of chromatin are geometrically open and being transcribed. The data are already sequence-aligned, and ...
3
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0answers
22 views

Do the eggs for larger litters come from the same meiosis events, or different ones?

There are some species of animals that give birth to more than one pup at a time. In these species, are the fertilized eggs all from one or a limited group of meiosis processes, or are they from ...
2
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1answer
173 views

recombination frequency problem

Three loci C, D and E are located on the same chromosome in this order. We found that the frequency of recombinants between C and D is 10% and that between D and E it is 20%. Assuming that ...
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2answers
115 views

Is it more likely that the very first living organisms had a linear genome?

Is it right to assume that the first living organisms on earth had a linear genome? I base this on the fact that linear macromolecules are clearly much more common in nature that circular ones. To be ...
2
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1answer
93 views

What is the result of meiosis?

Is the result of meiosis ONLY the sex gametes (male and female) which later meet to form a somatic cell? Sometimes I feel as if my book is hinting towards meiosis is the process where sperm cells meet ...
2
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1answer
84 views

What does chromosome CHR_Un, CHR_MT in the ftp site of NCBI mean?

I am not a biologist. But need some genetic data. So I searched internet and reached NCBI's website. I came to know from the FAQ page that I can the complete genome data of organisms from ...
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1answer
309 views

What is the structure and function of chromosomes during interphase?

Ok, it seems to be easy but I have probably ignored something by accident. Interphase is the phase where things are growing and the preparation for cell division happens. Its stages G1, S and G2. DNA ...
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1answer
49 views

Determining whether X chromosome from sperm or egg

Is there any way of determining which X chromosome a female inherited from her father and which from her mom ?
2
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1answer
133 views

What's the difference between a free chromosome fragment and an extrachromosomal array?

This is reference to a review on C. elegans mosaic analysis by Yochem and Herman, in which the authors make a distinction between free chromosome fragments and extrachromosomal arrays. For the ...
2
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2answers
115 views

Can a new Y-chromosome be created?

The major gene of the Y-chromosome is SRY. Would it be possible to get the X-chromosome and add SRY to create a "fuller" Y-chromosome? What advantage does the skinny Y-chromosome give an individual ...
2
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1answer
332 views

Properties of Satellite Chromosomes

I have some questions regarding Satellite chromsomes which could not be resolved by a google search. Does the satellite consist of telomeric sequences ? If not, What is the function of a satellite ? ...
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2answers
61 views

Maintaining purebred pedigrees and how to lessen chance of getting disease?

Many breeds of dogs are known for a high incidence of genetic disorders. German shepherd and Saint Bernard dogs are predisposed to developing a crippling condition called hip dysplasia. Q: What ...
2
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1answer
93 views

Have there been any experiments that duplicate chromosome copies from 23*2 to 23*3 or 23*4?

Deinococcus radiodurans is an amazing bacterium with a fantastic survival rate. It can survive to high doses of radiation, in a complete vacuum and in hydrochloric acid. How does this bacterium ...
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28 views

examples of chromosomal aberrations with lack of sexual chromosomes?

Are there any examples in animals where individuals survive having no copies of their sexual chromosomes?
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110 views

Coiling of chromatids during cell division

What is exactly coiling of chromosomes? I just heard about the names i.e paranemic, plectonemic, orthostichious, anorthospiral. I have ecaxtly no idea of what phenomenon is this. Also what type of ...
2
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0answers
38 views

Example(s) of reduced rate of mitotic progression?

Most species complete mitosis, and in particular the process of chromosome condensation, rather quickly, in a matter of minutes. Are there any known species that undergo mitoses with substantially ...
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1answer
439 views

What is the advantage of circular genomes for bacteria and linear genomes for other organisms?

Bacterial are a great group of organisms. They have circular genomes and never went toward linear genomes while other organisms show the opposite strategy and don't have circular genomes (disregarding ...
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1answer
81 views

Can IVF decrease the probability of trisomy in the fetuses of older mothers?

Is trisomy mostly due to complications with fertilization? If so, does in vitro fertilization reduce the probability of trisomy for the fetuses of older mothers? If not, can zygotes be screened ...
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1answer
224 views

Would two species of yeast with similar genome sizes have the same number of genes or chromosomes?

Similar organisms generally have similar genome sizes. Given this, would two species of yeast have the same number of genes and chromosomes? Edit: Fixed with thanks to @daniel-standage
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2answers
88 views

How many recombination events are there per generation in humans?

I'm looking for a reference that tells me how many recombenation events occur in humans from one generation to the next. Assuming that the human genome is a 3.3 GigaBases long DNA sequence, how many ...
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1answer
69 views

What does min mean?

I read that "trp operon is located at 27 min on E.coli chromosome." What does "min" mean ?
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Which sex is homogametic in side-blotched lizards?

I'm just trying to find out whether the male side-blotched lizard is the hetero- or homogametic sex in side-blotched lizards (Uta stansburiana) - some reptiles are ZW system (female heterogamete) and ...