The process through which a biological organism grows to maturity. In certain contexts it can mean the changes the organism goes through over its entire lifetime.

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0answers
60 views

How can bacteria adapt to a rich in resources environment? [on hold]

How can "normal" bacteria adapt to a non-extreme environment better than extremophiles in terms of foraging resources? If I could somehow eliminate all the factors like temperature, acidity and ...
1
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0answers
30 views

How is bilateral asymmetry determined in embryonic development?

What are the mechanisms that ensure consistent left-right asymmetric placement of various internal organs (heart, liver, etc) or consistent left-right asymmetric development of paired organs (brain, ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Embryo development terms

I'm trying to couple the following terms: cytoplasmic determinants, induction, positional information, hox genes, pattern information, morphogenisis, determination and differentiation. I hope ...
1
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2answers
33 views

At what age does the mouse skull stop growing?

Unless otherwise mandated, neuroscientific research on mice is done with ~7-week old animals. There is a sort-of mantra that at this age their skulls stop growing. However, recently, I noticed a ...
1
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1answer
34 views

Does a zygote express all genes?

If a zygote has all the cytoplasmic determinants and all the specific transcription factors, does that mean that all genes in the genome are expressed?
0
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0answers
29 views

Is the zygote the only totipotent cell?

I’ve been told that the unfertilized egg contains cytoplasmic determinants (e.g. proteins, transcription factors, mRNAs) that are divided unevenly during the early stages of cell division in an ...
7
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2answers
76 views

Do babies conceived naturally or artificially have any differences in long-term health?

Are there any long-term differences in children conceived via artificial insemination or sexual intercourse, pending that the mother successfully delivers the child?
7
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1answer
107 views

Why do fetuses have membranes between fingers and toes?

Are the membranes present between the fetal fingers and toes a remainder of the phylogenetic evolution, or just a way organs do grow most easily?
4
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0answers
25 views

How only one follicle develops into graffian follicle?

I've studied that one out of many follicle develops into mature or graffian follicle. The fact which confuses me is that, since all follicles are in same ovary, close to each other with equal supply ...
2
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0answers
13 views

How do the connections from V1 to V2 form during early development of the human brain?

I am wondering how corticocortical efferents from layer I and II in V1 develop to forward visual information to layer IV in V2. Is there topology preservation in these connections from the beginning ...
3
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0answers
27 views

How is the brain kickstarted during development [closed]

The brain is a complicated beast, that operates (generally) by electrical activity. During development, all cells originate from the a single "cell": the zygote. At some point during development, the ...
1
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1answer
97 views

What's the mechanism or structure responsible for new species genetic code generation? [closed]

I always had this question in mind. I think, If humans find answer to it then we can trigger the next evolution of human specie. What is the mechanism or structure responsible for evolution ? I don't ...
4
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2answers
190 views

Is the DNA different in each type of cell? What DNA is passed to offspring?

Our body contains many different types of cells and each of those cells have their own DNA (correct me if wrong) like skin cells their own DNA that makes them skin cells instead of muscle cells. So ...
0
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1answer
29 views

Lack of yolk in mammalian oocytes as compared to other vertebrates?

Why do mammalian oocytes have little to no yolk? How does it compare to other vertebrates such as frogs, fish, and birds?
0
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1answer
28 views

Polar bodies fertilization

Suppose a sperm fertilized a 2nd polar body( haploid) is there a chance of somewhat normal development?
1
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1answer
94 views

Synaptic pruning and selective elimination during adolescence

How does Synaptic pruning occur during pre-adolescence, adolescence and post-adolescence, after there is blooming overproduction of synaptic connections until the years of late childhood, and how does ...
5
votes
3answers
272 views

Symmetry of species [duplicate]

I've got a silly question, sorry for that. I know, that we probably have no the right answer and the current answer could be "that's evolution, external conditions". I'd like to speculate, why most of ...
1
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0answers
31 views

Why are belly buttons on the stomach (why does the umbilical cord end up attached to the stomach)?

Belly buttons are at the site where the umbilical cord was attached to us as we developed inside our mothers. The same is true for all placental mammals. Why are belly buttons on the stomach? Why ...
0
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0answers
30 views

Why do male rats and horses lack nipples? [duplicate]

I have read many articles about why male rats and horses lack nipples, however, I still don't understand why! Do male rats, mice, and horses have nipples in early embryonic life and then lose them?
3
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0answers
20 views

What would the resulting karyotype be if someone with Klinefelter syndrome fertilized an “empty” egg?

Endoreduplication: is a form of nuclear polyploidization that results in multiple, uniform copies of chromosomes. This process is common in plants and animals, especially in tissues with high ...
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votes
1answer
190 views

How may the age of a child be estimated when required to do so, in video-graphic evidence?

How may it be possible to roughly conclude that a subject in a select piece of video-graphic evidence presented, is in fact a child, i.e. without the subject being, physically examined? Is it ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

When does lactation occur?

High levels of estrogens and progesterone antagonize prolactin’s effect on the mammary glands, and it’s only after the placenta has been removed and the levels of estrogens and progesterone has ...
6
votes
1answer
627 views

Why does a fetus drinks and urinates into the amniotic fluid?

I was reading this website saying that fetuses urinate into the amniotic fluid. It also mentioned that, because we drink the amniotic fluid, we’ve been drinking our urine for months. However, why do ...
1
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0answers
46 views

Which sperm fertilizes the egg?

Hundreds of acrosomes must undergo exocytosis to digest holes in the zona pellucida. This is one case that does not bear out the adage, “The early bird catches the worm.” A sperm that comes along ...
1
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0answers
11 views

Comparing Embryonic stem cell and hepatic stem cell

So, currently, I want to compare transcriptome data for liver cell development. I found 2 data sets which start from stem cell, hepatoblast, and then adult cell. The first data set use hepatic stem ...
2
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1answer
24 views

Toll Like Receptors Vs Toll Receptors

What are the major differences between them, apart from one being in humans and other in Drosophilla?
0
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1answer
39 views

How DNA programs the first cell in womb into a human [closed]

Sorry if you see me silly. I am just a programmer happens to be curious about biology... So far I understand how DNA make protein, how cell divides, how one composed of cells->tissues-> organs. ...
1
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0answers
25 views

Resources for similarity between embryos

Is there a scientific paper/reputable image resource out there which I can use that the embryos of different organisms (vertebrata) are similar in their early developmental stages(without falling into ...
0
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1answer
118 views

How are neural networks encoded in the DNA? [closed]

The central nervous systems as well as the brain->muscles and sensory cells->brain nervous pathways, need to be precisely wired for life to be possible. Moreover they are wired almost exactly the same ...
0
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2answers
24 views

What is the germ layer origin of human lung fibroblasts?

What is the germ layer origin of human lung-derived fibroblasts?
1
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0answers
19 views

Why are segments/parasegments in fruit fly embryos staggered?

I'm reading my developmental biology textbook and I don't understand this concept. I can see how concentrations of Eve and Ftz determine each parasegment. However, I don't understand why the length of ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

What is the mechanism of folic acid deficiency and neural tube defects?

I am having difficulty finding the mechanism by which folic acid reduces the risk of neural tube defects. I know that it does so, but what in particular actually occurs with folic acid deficiency to ...
1
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0answers
63 views

How often does parthenogenesis in mammals happen?

Probably everyone knows that mammals can't produce viable offspring by parthenogenesis. But there are reports of human chimeras (see: a human parthenogenetic chimaera) and it's known for mice to ...
3
votes
0answers
100 views

Cause-and-effect questions about growth and development of plant

I need to solve some cause-and-effect problems. The problems are related to growth and development of plant. "Growth and Development" chapter is the first chapter in third level of high school (senior ...
1
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0answers
21 views

Tissue grafting in marine invertebrates

I'm trying to source a procedure for a transplanting tissue in regenerating polyps. Would anyone happen to know where I can find a method of adhering to donor to host tissue? Thanks
2
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1answer
40 views

Who compared developmental biology to crystallography?

I need to find out the name of a nineteenth century biologist who compared developmental biology to crystallography. His idea was that crystals are formed from 'cells' (defined molecular units) that ...
5
votes
1answer
355 views

Where do most mutations come from, mitosis or meiosis?

According to this (old) paper there are 10 times more mutations during meiosis than during mitosis. One reason for that is that recombination often causes replication error and therefore mutations. ...
2
votes
1answer
319 views

Any examples of an organism's life cycle where the reproductive stage occur before the 'adult' stage?

Most life cycles we knew of consist of a juvenile stage (e.g. larval for insects, sporozoite for some intracellular parasites), a reproductive stage and an adult stage. Usually the reproductive stage ...
4
votes
2answers
952 views

Could we slow down life? [closed]

As far as I know there is no absolute time measurement (one that would measure time in a non-environment-dependent fashion) in any life form. Only such time measurements exist, which are dependent ...
4
votes
1answer
843 views

Cause of Crease in Drupe Fruit

What causes the crease through the pericarp of a drupe fruit (peach, nectarine, olive)? It may just be in exocarp as @Ilan pointed out, but I assumed (perhaps wrongly), that the division continued ...
13
votes
1answer
2k views

Do babies resemble their father?

An often heard theory is that newborns and babies resemble the father more than the mother, a theory apparently ignited by a Nature paper by Christenfeld and Hill (1995). Figure 1 shows one of the ...
6
votes
1answer
51 views

How is it determined in a zygote state of foetus, that which side is mouth and which side is for anus?

After the fertilization when the zygote is in the growing state to a foetus, the main canal is introduced first, from mouth to anus. But my question is when the canal is created first how does it ...
3
votes
4answers
204 views

Recommend good conversational books to learn about cell and developmental biology or biochemisty?

I'm an engineer by training and teaching myself the basics of cell and developmental biology. I'm using Scott F. Gilbert's Developmental Biology and Alberts' Essential Cell Biology right now, and they ...
2
votes
0answers
15 views

variance in zygotic gene expression across species

I found this review on the Maternal-to-Zygotic transition (MZT), describing how developmental control switches from maternally deposited RNAs to zygotic expression. I was struck by figure 1, and the ...
6
votes
1answer
74 views

Why differentiated cells can't “undifferentiate” (under normal conditions)?

In a process called differentiation, the cells of the developing organism undergo huge changes, which result in cells, functioning "completely" differently. Two cells are considered to be of different ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Cysticercoids of Eucestoda

I have found the following pictures representing cysticercoids of Eucestoda. If I correctly understand the right part of the picture, I would say that the development of the scolex is portrayed on ...
1
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0answers
23 views

Is this a legitimate teratoma for a human pluripotent stem cell assay?

I can't quite make out this teratoma: ...
1
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1answer
63 views

How detachment/separation works in biology?

It might be a strange question, but I'm interested in the mechanics of separation/detachment during asexual reproduction, for example when an organism reproduces by budding (I don't mean cellular ...
5
votes
0answers
105 views

How does an organism know when to stop growing, whether it is already on the outermost layer? [closed]

When a multicellular organism is under its development how does the current outermost layer of cells "know" that they should not divide furthermore, as their bodyplan coded into DNA is already ...
7
votes
2answers
157 views

Why are there no artificial wombs yet?

If the conditions within the womb are mimicked, and proper amniotic fluid with constantly recycling nutrients is maintained, is it not possible to obtain an artificial womb? Is there anything missing? ...