0
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3answers
59 views

What is the purpose of DNA? [closed]

My very basic understanding is DNA gets transcribed into RNA by effectively replacing thymine with uracil, then RNA is translated to make proteins. Looking at it from an engineering perspective, it ...
3
votes
1answer
55 views

Can we attack viruses by attaching proteins and such to their shells?

Haven't looked into this to very long, but an initial search didn't return anything. HIV uses certain co-receptors to enter our cells. Could we flood the blood stream with specially designed ...
3
votes
2answers
84 views

The move from RNA to DNA and the necessity of reverse transcriptase

In this piece about giant viruses and the origin of life, in the context of the move from RNA world to DNA world, virologist Valerian Dolja states: In order to move from RNA to DNA, you need an ...
0
votes
0answers
90 views

Ribosomal Turing Machines, DNA/RNA computation

I'm a computer science guy, recently crossing over to do some research in computational biology on RNA secondary structure prediction. While looking through the materials I got a crazy idea, what if ...
4
votes
2answers
163 views

What makes DNA helical?

Why isn't DNA like RNA; why isn't RNA like DNA, that is, helical? Why are RNA chains straight?
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Conclusions from hybridization results

A double stranded DNA was denatured in a mixture that included mRNA from a gene in the segment. The mixture was then cooled to promote RNA and DNA hybridization. The following figure the results. ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

What information do microarray image convey?

OK I have read that a cell generates 4 kinds of digital (to be precise discrete) data namely DNA, RNA, Protein (sequences that can be encoded as string sequences of nucleotides/ amino acids) and micro ...
2
votes
1answer
148 views

How is the transcription direction of RNA polymerase determined?

When transcription factors attach to the DNA strand - How do they know in which direction they have to initialize the transcription by rna polymerase? Is it always read in the same direction anyway? ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

2 types of telomerases?

As telomerase works by adding new nucleotides complementary to the RNA it contains, it cannot work for the complementary strand. Say telomerase X has RNA complementary to the 5' to 3' strand it ...
4
votes
1answer
28 views

Telomerase in tetrahymena

In this amazing video, at 26:03 we see this image We now know that the telomerase contains a sequence complementary to the telomere sequence and so is able to do what it is capable of doing in this ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

In vitro transcription, contamination problem

I am using a RNA which is in vitro transcripted before I started my project. It turned out it is not prepared properly and has DNA contamination. Instead of perform the in vitro transcription again, ...
1
vote
2answers
373 views

Gel electrophoresis after RNAse treatment

I do not understand how to solve this question. I know that RNAse will cut smaller pieces of RNA. The answer given is A
0
votes
1answer
126 views

A basic example of the interactions of 2 or more non-identical alleles leading to an advantageous outcome for an individual organism

Could someone help me out with a basic example of the interactions of 2 or more non-identical alleles leading to an advantageous outcome for an individual organism? Based on empirical research OR on a ...
1
vote
0answers
89 views

Transcription takes place from the 5’ to the 3’ end of the m-RNA. Why?

Only one side of the DNA ladder is copied (the sense side). The sense side starts with a 3’ end. This means the corresponding mRNA will have to assemble starting from the 5’ end. This is my initial ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Why use DNA polymerase in making cDNA?

RT is capable of synthesizing a complementary dna strand ( as in HIV life cycle.) Then why is DNA pol used when cDNA (synthesizing the second strand of it ) has to be synthesized from mRNA ( For eg.to ...
6
votes
4answers
463 views

Does RNA polymerase move around DNA or does DNA rotate benath the polymerase?

I'm thinking of the human genome specfically, but more general answers are welcome. As RNA polymerase moves along the DNA helix it follows a single strand. The two DNA strands are unwound locally ...
1
vote
1answer
182 views

How to deduce if RNA virus infection or DNA virus infection

Is there any general rule to say this must be RNA virus infection and the other one DNA virus infection? Example of a case: 5 children develop a bright red rash on the face and turns violet after a ...
1
vote
1answer
113 views

DNA Replication

I just wanted to understand the basic steps behind the replication of the lagging strand of DNA: Have helicase unwind it first DNA Primase lays down RNA primers in fragments, called Okazaki ...
5
votes
1answer
143 views

Do thymine and uracil ever appear in the same strand of RNA?

Wikipedia says that "in RNA, thymine is replaced with uracil in most cases." I'm curious what are the cases when this does not happen? Does this ever occur in normal functioning, or is it an error? ...
2
votes
2answers
193 views

Can a dNTP be built into a RNA strand?

DNA consists of deoxyribonucleotides, RNA consists of ribonucleotides. They differ mainly (apart from the uracil / thymine difference) in the sugar part, the deoxyribose and the ribose. Those two ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

How are atoms in benzopyridines and benzopurines numbered?

I am well-aware of the numbering system used for the traditional bases, as seen below. My question is how are the atoms in the size-expanded bases seen in xDNA and xRNA numbered?
2
votes
2answers
272 views

Translate DNA to Protein

Assuming the sequence shown is read left to right, what is the sequence of the protein produced? sequence: 5’-ATGTACTTCCATCTGGAATAG-3’ MY ATTEMPT: I know RNA is synthesized 5 to 3. This is ...
12
votes
1answer
262 views

Can DNA act as a translation substrate?

I get conflicting answers. One would think if it was true, it would be rather seminal and widely known. There are papers from Khorana[1], Holland[2], and Bretscher[3] (late 60s) that suggest that it ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Why do DNA and RNA have the functions they have?

I know that there are two most important directions of genetic information transfer in living organisms: DNA->DNA and DNA->RNA. The first is replication, and the second is transcription. I wonder if ...
25
votes
3answers
9k views

Why do eukaryotic organisms have introns in their DNA?

We touched on introns and exons in my bio class, but unfortunately we didn't really talk about why Eukaryotes have introns. It would seem they would have to have some purpose since prokaryotes do not ...
15
votes
2answers
236 views

Can methylation from DNA get copied to RNA during transcription?

Methylation on gene-body and 3'UTRs if copied to mRNA can potentially regulate post-transcription modifications or expression regulation. But I'm not sure if they are maintained after transcription or ...
10
votes
2answers
179 views

Can DNA produce ribozyme-like structures?

RNA is known to act as an enzyme via its ability to fold itself in specific ways. Is DNA capable of such structures? Or is it some biochemical reason stopping the folding? Have they been observed in ...
13
votes
3answers
1k views

What implications has the missing 2'-OH on the capability of DNA to form 3D structures?

The chemical difference between RNA and DNA is the missing 2'-hydroxyl group in the nucleotides that build DNA. The major effect of that change that I know of is the higher stability of DNA compared ...
50
votes
3answers
27k views

Why is uracil used in RNA rather than thymine?

What is the advantage gained by the substitution of thymine with uracil? I have read previously that it is due to thymine being "better protected" and therefore more suited to the storage role of ...